#1
i've played guitar for some time now and have always played with piano too, but for my own fun. i've never really looked into trying to record anything but i would like to have a small setup, just for my fun. but the problem is i don't know exactly what i need, so if anybody could help me, it would be great.

i know i need:
DAW
Mic (for amp and acoustic guitar, no drums) not sure on vocals
mic preamp
and something for everything to hook into the computer, does a mixer do this or not?

thanks again.
#4
Quote by HunterXtreem
i've played guitar for some time now and have always played with piano too, but for my own fun. i've never really looked into trying to record anything but i would like to have a small setup, just for my fun. but the problem is i don't know exactly what i need, so if anybody could help me, it would be great.

i know i need:
DAW
Mic (for amp and acoustic guitar, no drums) not sure on vocals
mic preamp
and something for everything to hook into the computer, does a mixer do this or not?

thanks again.


Here's a small setup. Microphones connect to an Art Dual Pre with XLR cables. This is an interface which includes preamps, which connects via USB to your computer.

For piano, you'll need:
Two boom microphone stands. These can work with vocals as well.
Two condenser microphones. This matched pair will do very well capturing both the low and high ends. Behringer B2s are cheaper, but they have a fairly undetailed sound.

Acoustic and vocals usually only require one good large diaphragm microphone. Studio Projects B1, M Audio's Nova, and many of MXL's offerings are all popular and solid choices. They run about $100.

With vocals, invest in a pop filter, and possibly a shock mount (which keeps the microphone quiet should you bump into it accidentally). Sealed headphones like the Sennheiser HD280 or Sony 7506 are necessary to monitor your performance well...HD202s can work in a pinch.
Quote by keiron_d
thank you sooooooo much for the advice Fast_Fingers...i would hug you if i could...i looooove you!


True love exists in UG. Can you feel it?

Recording Guitar Amps 101
#7
Quote by HunterXtreem
ah, thank you very much! will i also need a mixer to go with the preamps or not?


No, you can adjust levels within the software itself, or on the interface. Mixers are actually becoming less and less important to recording, not only because of computers, but also because engineers prefer having lots of different "colors" to their sound, so they'd go for multiple kinds of preamps rather than a mixer full of the same one.
Quote by keiron_d
thank you sooooooo much for the advice Fast_Fingers...i would hug you if i could...i looooove you!


True love exists in UG. Can you feel it?

Recording Guitar Amps 101
#8
ok, so i can just use my DAW. that's probably my last major concern, what's a good DAW? i'm not limited to one genre, so if possible i would like for it to be good in multiple aspects. thanks!
#9
Reaper's frequently recommended as a choice. It's $50 and quite high end, if not initially inviting. I've heard good things about Mixcraft as well.
Quote by keiron_d
thank you sooooooo much for the advice Fast_Fingers...i would hug you if i could...i looooove you!


True love exists in UG. Can you feel it?

Recording Guitar Amps 101
#10
Reaper is a great choice, since it's very cheap and has the features of much more expensive software. It's also a good one to learn as it bears similarities to the high end software that you might want to use in the future, such as Cubase and Logic.

The recommendations made by FastFingers are all solid choices. If you have the budget, I'd certainly add some monitors to that. Monitors are speakers which don't colour the sound of your music, as commercial stereo and computer speakers do. This makes them pretty essential for mixing your tunes. You won't need to buy as expensive headphones with monitors, as you'll only be using them for tracking your performance.

I'd recommend the Wharfedale DP-8's. A lot of people also swear by KRK RP5's on a budget. You can get both sets for $200 I think.
There is poetry in despair.
#12
Fruity Loops is mainly MIDI based, as isn't so good for recording and mixing audio. I think you'd be far better off with Reaper if you plan to work with audio and MIDI. FL Studio is better if you want to work almost exclusively with MIDI, without purchasing additional softsynths. That's my opinion.
There is poetry in despair.
#13
It is extremely difficult (In my oppinion) to record audio with Fruity loops, Like fridge said, it's mainly midi based, recording midi, and producing beats and midi.
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