#1
C D bE F bG bA A B


R, 2, b3, 4, b5, b6, 6, 7

WWHWHHWW

is this right?


I really sorry for keep on making these threads but i'm really trying to understand...
#2
You have the Diminished half-whole, and the Diminished whole-half

Half-Whole just repeats half whole half whole etc

Whole-Half just repeats Whole half whole half etc

they are both symmetrical scales

There are quite a few different scales for diminished chords because as long as you have a root, min3rd, and b5, it is diminished. Its the extensions of that chord that decide anything further as far as what diminished scale to use, but if you are playing over just a diminished chord you can just pick one. Another scale is the Locrian mode. Locrian mode is for half diminshed (min7b5) chords.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Does that help?
Last edited by TollBoothWorker at Jul 10, 2008,
#3
^You're new so in the friendliest way possible (i'm not being sarcastic) could you please use the edit button instead of triple posting?


You almost have it right. It should be 1, 2, b3, 4, b5, b6, bb7, 7

They produce the same tone but are still different intervals. If you look at a diminished 7 chord you see the intervals are taken from that scale: 1, b3, b5, bb7


Use this scale over diminished 7th chords as the intervals compliment eachother.

Edit: Oh yeah, the steps go: WHWHWHWH

There is also the dominant diminished scale that goes: HWHWHWHW
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Last edited by metal4all at Jul 10, 2008,
#4
C D bE F bG bA A B


R, 2, b3, 4, b5, b6, 6, 7

WWHWHHWW

is this right?

No, you seem to be confusing flattened intervals with half steps, and natural intervals with whole steps.

The 'b' in front of an interval has no effect on whether it is a half step or a whole step from the previous note.

There are twelve pitches.
starting from A they are A A# B C C# D D# E F F# G G# and back to A.
Note that A# C# D# F# G# are the same pitch as Bb Db Eb Gb Ab respectively. Sometimes it is more appropriate to use flats rather than sharps and vice versa.
It is VERY important to see that there is no sharp or flat between B and C, and E and F.

A whole step (W) is a distance of 2 semitones, or a whole tone (2 frets on guitar). For example, G (3rd fret E string) to A (5th fret E string) is a whole step. As is B (7th fret) to C# (9th fret).

A half step (H) is a distance of 1 semitone (1 fret on guitar). For example, G (3rd fret) to Ab (4th fret) is a half step. As is B (7th fret) to C (8th fret).

Now, look at the notes you gave. C D Eb F Gb Ab A B.

There is a whole step between C and D
There is a half step between D and Eb
There is a whole step between Eb and F
There is a half step between F and Gb
There is a whole step between Gb and Ab
There is a half step between Ab and A
There is a whole step between A and B
There is a half step between B and C

So you see that the step-formula for the C whole-half diminished scale is
WHWHWHWH

Recap:
C W D H Eb W F H Gb W Ab H A W B H C

If you don't understand where I got any of this, read it through again slowly then ASK
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#6
so is the Melodic Jazz WHWWWWH?
I'd call that melodic minor, but Melodic Jazz could be another name for it.

Happy to help
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#7
Quote by Graveworm
so is the Melodic Jazz WHWWWWH?


and thanks for the help!


It's called Melodic Minor or Jazz Minor. The easiest way to look it is as the Major Scale with a flattened 3rd.