#1
Quick question here, if I have a harmonica in the key of G. Would that mean that the first hole would be G and the next one be A? And if I draw the note it would be the sharp? So making the first hole (drawn) be G#?
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#2
I'm going to assume that your harmonica is a diatonic one. In that case, the first hole blown would be a G. The second hole blown would not be an A, but a B.
The first hole drawn would be an A.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/9/94/BluesHarp_Notes_Layout.png
is useful for further reference

However, if your harmonica is chromatic one, I have no idea
Last edited by mr_magic at Jul 10, 2008,
#3
the (over-)drawn note would be a G#, if thats what you mean, but its the blown note.
u can also suck air through that hole, and that would be an A. the next hole probably has an B as blown note. all blown notes make a chord of the key of the harmonica (Blues-harp).

I´m quite sure about this, but better look it up on wikipedia, it gives the answers for all the questions u would never think of.
#4
The blow notes would be a G major arpeggio (G B D G B D G B D G). The draw notes would be most of the diatonic notes between (A D F# A C E F# A C E). Obviously, this is excludes some of the notes in the scale, and doesn't include any notes outside of the scale. The notes in between can be achieved through bending, overblows, and overdraws. For instance, a draw bend on a hole 6 would bring the E down to an Eb.
#5
Quote by grampastumpy
The blow notes would be a G major arpeggio (G B D G B D G B D G). The draw notes would be most of the diatonic notes between (A D F# A C E F# A C E). Obviously, this is excludes some of the notes in the scale, and doesn't include any notes outside of the scale. The notes in between can be achieved through bending, overblows, and overdraws. For instance, a draw bend on a hole 6 would bring the E down to an Eb.

+1.

What is an overblow/draw? The harmonica sites I remember visiting via google only had basic songs and bending.
#6
Quote by kirbyrocknroll
+1.

What is an overblow/draw? The harmonica sites I remember visiting via google only had basic songs and bending.
Overblows and overdraws are the only way to really play chromatically on a diatonic harp. Regular bends get some of the chromatic notes, but not all. It works by getting the "wrong" reed to sound. An overblow is when you blow, but you get the draw reed to sound instead and vice versa. It fills in the gaps. For instance, a 4 overblow yields a Bb(or an Eb on a C harmonica), and a 7 overdraw yields an Ab(or Db). I'm not a great harmonica player, but one thing I can do a lot of guys can't is play a chromatic scale!
#7
Quote by grampastumpy
Overblows and overdraws are the only way to really play chromatically on a diatonic harp. Regular bends get some of the chromatic notes, but not all. It works by getting the "wrong" reed to sound. An overblow is when you blow, but you get the draw reed to sound instead and vice versa. It fills in the gaps. For instance, a 4 overblow yields a Bb(or an Eb on a C harmonica), and a 7 overdraw yields an Ab(or Db). I'm not a great harmonica player, but one thing I can do a lot of guys can't is play a chromatic scale!

How do you do that?

Won't getting the draw reed to sound just...make it sound like you're drawing? Also, how does blowing miss some of the chromatic notes? Don't bends bring the pitch down for every note? Which notes do you miss by bending?

Questions, questions!
Last edited by kirbyrocknroll at Jul 10, 2008,
#8
How do you do that?

Won't getting the draw reed to sound just...make it sound like you're drawing?
LOL, I totally forgot to mention that for some reason, something to do with air pressure in the reed chamber or something, the overblown/overdrawn note sounds a half step higher than expected. As to how to do it, it's tough to explain. Try doing an 8 blow bend and taking that exact embouchure and bringing it to the 4, 5, or 6 hole and blowing. Trying kind of making a "cooh" sound and have your mouth like you're gathering spit.
#9
Quote by grampastumpy
LOL, I totally forgot to mention that for some reason, something to do with air pressure in the reed chamber or something, the overblown/overdrawn note sounds a half step higher than expected. As to how to do it, it's tough to explain. Try doing an 8 blow bend and taking that exact embouchure and bringing it to the 4, 5, or 6 hole and blowing. Trying kind of making a "cooh" sound and have your mouth like you're gathering spit.

Ahh, thanks. See my edit just in case you missed it

Now, I just need to pull out my old harmonica with some reeds that are dead
#10
Ahh, thanks. See my edit just in case you missed it

Now, I just need to pull out my old harmonica with some reeds that are dead
Oh, I did miss it. I'm gonna speak in terms of a C harmonica since that's what I have and prefer. Regular bends miss the note that can't be bent for each hole. A bend bends the higher note for each hole down halfway to the other one. For instance: 4 Blow = C, 4 Draw = D, 4 draw bend = Db. This is why a draw bend on hole 5 is pointless: it gets you the quarter tone between E and F. So since the bent note is always between the two normal ones, there are gaps: between 4 draw D and 5 blow E, between 6 draw A and 7 draw B, etc.

, have fun with those. I started on a $7 piece of crap I got at a street vendor or something. The beauty of the harmonica is that they're so cheap. I got mine for $25...small part of the reason I don't play a chromatic($100+...yeah not so much). Harmonicas are also portable. Epic instruments.