#1
What would make finger picking have more style and be more "original?" And what are some less used techniques in classical that work well in classical?
Please help! I want to make my music something spectacular and my well has run dry.
#2
...if you want it to be original you have to think of it yourself.
My name is Danny. Call me that.
#5
Quote by asator
...if you want it to be original you have to think of it yourself.

lulz, so true...

as for techniques that aren't used much in classical I say you go for pinch harmonics!!! yeah, I said it, I went there
Gear:
Ibanez RG121
Ibanez GTA15R Amp
red Allegro nylon-strung acoustic of unkown model



Quote by Mechanix

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^
#6
Quote by asator
...if you want it to be original you have to think of it yourself.



I was asking for people to respond with "use harmonics" or "wide vibrato" or "I really love huge bends." Not so I could copy anyone just so I could add my take on it. And if your answer to my question is that, than every guitarist essentially ever aside from the person who invented it, is unoriginal.


lol to pinch harmonics, I guess they could work sometimes.
#7
Quote by Matt Chavie
...every guitarist essentially ever aside from the person who invented it, is unoriginal.


This is actually true. You can't be truely original, we can only build on what's already there.

The reason I brought up Michael Hedges is most of his techniques are to wacky to actually name, though some have tried. Tasteful tapping, slap harmonics, utilising an acoustic guitars percussive qualities, artificial harmonics, altered tunings.. each tuning opens up a world of its own. In one guitar, you essentially have as many instruments as there are (reasonable) tuning combinations. When you start making your own, you can get a sound that's very difficult to emulate without knowing exactly what you're tuned to.
#8
Quote by Matt Chavie
I was asking for people to respond with "use harmonics" or "wide vibrato" or "I really love huge bends." Not so I could copy anyone just so I could add my take on it. And if your answer to my question is that, than every guitarist essentially ever aside from the person who invented it, is unoriginal.


lol to pinch harmonics, I guess they could work sometimes.


Well, artificial harmonics are used in classical playing, and they can sound very good on a nylon string guitar. Lenny Breau is pretty much the man at this in a non-classical context. Actually, Lenny is, or was, the man at a number of things, so I would check him out if you want some real fingerpicking goodness.

Wide bends are difficult on nylon though- there's something about the physics of nylon strings that makes them react differently to bending. It's not at all rarely used in classical playing, but the classical vibrato is a good thing to learn (instead of bending the string you pull it toward the nut and then toward the bridge). I use this a lot even in electric playing- it has a unique sound. Tremolo is a nice fingerpicking technique. The best known tremolo piece is Recuerdos de la Alhambra, but Barrios also wrote some nice tremolo pieces, sdme of which are a bit easier to play. I'd definitely call a good tremolo fingerpicking with style, but it can take a while to learn.
#10
Quote by actaderock
listen to rise against (it is punk rock)


I'm confused as to why...