#1
I started learning sweep picking yesterday I have been learning from the ug lesson guide to sweep picking.

http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/guitar_techniques/guide_to_sweep_picking.html

I recently got up to left hand rolling. I am wondering if after i play each note, should i only lift my finger up a little bit so my finger is muting the string? Because i was thinking that if i didn't do this the open string will sound?

EDIT:Link works now
Last edited by kilbie at Jul 10, 2008,
#2
Link not worky...

anyways, the rolling thing sounds like a good idea to me, but it would probably take time to perfect.
#3
Assuming I understand you correctly, it's not a big deal if your technique is pretty clean. You do need to come straight up off the string though, so you don't wind up sounding it in the release- it's like the opposite of a pull-off in that you want it to make no noise. It's easier to make no sound than it is to mute. But this is really no different than what happens when you change strings while alternate picking- it just happens more often when you're sweep picking.
#4
if you mute with your right hand as well it should help. once the string is played your finger lifts and your palm mutes. working quickly. its basically a roll with the right hand. very effective on sweeps as well as shredding on single notes. play the string and mute... etc
#5
Quote by evolucian
if you mute with your right hand as well it should help. once the string is played your finger lifts and your palm mutes. working quickly. its basically a roll with the right hand. very effective on sweeps as well as shredding on single notes. play the string and mute... etc


Personally, I've never liked much palm muting for sweeps--i don't like the sound it gives, but thats just my opinion.

Rolling. The idea is that you have the first note fretted with the tip of a finger. To fret the second note, you bend the finger back at the first joint to fret the second note, while at the same time lifting the tip off of the first note. However, as you said, you should lift the tip off in a way that it initially still touches the string to mute it.

It something that's kind of hard to just explain in text, so try to find some videos on youtube.
#6
It's not actually muting the sweep, merely muting the string once its played. Once your pick moves to a higher string your palm mutes the previous string. When you come back down its not a problem as your left hand mutes the strings anyway. What works for one person won't work for another, but you welcome to try it. Your sound cleans up straight away. The problem with hovering your finger on a string sort of slows you down and doesn't give your hand the proper freedom it needs. Especially if you plan to come out of the sweep and let rip on a few single notes.

It is correct to let the left hand's fingers roll. But when you start playing add 9th arpeggio's, try the palm method. It works. Good luck.

Edit: If I'm not mistaken i may have learnt it from a Frank Gambale video. But it's too long ago to remember from where exactly. No one's wrong.
Last edited by evolucian at Jul 21, 2008,
#7
Quote by evolucian
It's not actually muting the sweep, merely muting the string once its played. Once your pick moves to a higher string your palm mutes the previous string. When you come back down its not a problem as your left hand mutes the strings anyway. What works for one person won't work for another, but you welcome to try it. Your sound cleans up straight away. The problem with hovering your finger on a string sort of slows you down and doesn't give your hand the proper freedom it needs. Especially if you plan to come out of the sweep and let rip on a few single notes.

It is correct to let the left hand's fingers roll. But when you start playing add 9th arpeggio's, try the palm method. It works. Good luck


Okay, I was just a little confused as to what you meant as I've seen both done. I do a bit of what you are talking about, but I still rely primarily on my left hand for muting.
#8
Do it slow and develop a technique that allows you to sweep clean, then speed it up slowly, and keep doing so. It'll be like second nature in no time to sweep without the ringing strings.
#9
The idea behind muting and sweep picking is;

let your picking hand mute all the lower strings (low notes) and let your fretting fingers mute the higher strings.
#10
Quote by evolucian
if you mute with your right hand as well it should help. once the string is played your finger lifts and your palm mutes. working quickly. its basically a roll with the right hand. very effective on sweeps as well as shredding on single notes. play the string and mute... etc


could you please explain me how to mute with the palm i cant get it.
#11
i recently noticed, why should we do the left hand rolling if we anyways mute the strings with the right hand?
#12
Because you don't always mute everything with the right. If the majority of your muting comes from the left, you are able to use the right hands muting (ranging from none, to the strings that aren't being played, to a full on palm mute) to control the dynamicsand tone, and aid the left hand if needed.
#13
but with the left hand anyway, even if you lift the finger and leave it still touching the string, you will have to move it from there, and the string will still sound, wont it?
#15
Quote by TheShred201
No. It takes practice but you can control it all just fine with the left.


but how? i mean, i just put my finger on a string without pression down, and if i remove it it makes sound.

Could you please explain me?
#16
Like shred said, it takes practice. My experience has been to use the right hand to mute as well as the left hand. Seeing as my palm is not too far up from the bridge i do still have a tiny part of the string still ringing, therefore the left hand mute on the string works well.

Was that too clinical an answer? I apologise if it is.


Constant practice is necessary as it takes a lot of time to learn any technique, and that does not equate to 2 hours or even 5 days. Try the sweeping technique and attempt applying any form of muting and it starts coming naturally. Good luck
#17
Quote by evolucian
Like shred said, it takes practice. My experience has been to use the right hand to mute as well as the left hand. Seeing as my palm is not too far up from the bridge i do still have a tiny part of the string still ringing, therefore the left hand mute on the string works well.

Was that too clinical an answer? I apologise if it is.


Constant practice is necessary as it takes a lot of time to learn any technique, and that does not equate to 2 hours or even 5 days. Try the sweeping technique and attempt applying any form of muting and it starts coming naturally. Good luck


well what i meant with the rolling left hand is lifting a finger inmediately after picking another note.. you are supposed to do that to get individual notes, but as you mute with the right hand thats not necessary anymore, is it?
#19
Well, thinking that it doesn't matter if you now muting with the right, all should be good... um... no.

They aid each other because a muted sweep sounds terrible though it does have its place. Muting right hand with the palm roll only is ok, not great. It takes two hands to play guitar and you have to find a balance between the hands so that they can work together. The left hand mute is needed and coincides with the right hand. Your palm mute could work on its own once the roll is sorted out but until then (because it offers its own challenges and intricacies) learn the part of both hands.

Short cuts only work later in technique, never in the beginning. And, you'll develop your own short cuts as time moves on. Good luck. Hope it helps

****A quick note: The right hand roll is mostly used to control unwanted string noise when moving across. The left hand roll is very important but it only applies to adjacent notes. When you are moving with a few frets between each note, that is when the right hand palm roll comes into full effect. Hope this helps and also clarifies the necessity of technique in both hands*****
Last edited by evolucian at Aug 21, 2008,