#1
Here's my current situation. I've been spending the past few months learning theory in-depth, and my technique has began to start lacking. During that time I did exercises to keep my technique fresh, but not really progress it further. I'm wanting to put my technique at the level it should be, on par with my theory knowledge. I don't know where to start. I was doing chromatic runs and simple exercises, but it's not helping that much anymore. I know the basics like starting slow, practice with a metronome, etc. I'm looking for some exercises that will improve my technique and bring me one step closer to becoming the shredder that I dream about. Any help is greatly appreciated!
#2
when i first saw the title i just wanted to say: ok wait a min for me i'll be right there in a moment to move your fingers along lolz -.-

but now not being stupid: you should start doing some arpeggios up and down. and really just improvise too. that's where you get much technique from.

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=879853

lots of exercises there.
tapping, arpeggios, chromatic, etc etc. it's got it all.
#3
My advice is always going to be the same for this kind of query. Learn to hear before you learn to shred. Musicality comes first. I know this is a tremendously frustrating answer, so you might want to ignore it for now. But when what you're doing stops working, come back to this idea.

If you want better technique, play very slowly and learn to stop all unnecessary motion in your hands. Don't post back with something like "But I have!" This takes years to master, if not the rest of your life. Every motion should be no larger than it has to be- your hands should almost look like they're not moving at all. The only way you can learn this is to play slowly enough that you are aware of every subtlety in how your hands move. Spend 10-20% of your time playing at your top speed, and 80-90% playing at half that.

Spend the other 100% playing music that you like. There's nothing as useless as a guitarist who can't spontaneously entertain some people with music.
#5
Quote by mezzopiano
My advice is always going to be the same for this kind of query. Learn to hear before you learn to shred. Musicality comes first. I know this is a tremendously frustrating answer, so you might want to ignore it for now. But when what you're doing stops working, come back to this idea.

If you want better technique, play very slowly and learn to stop all unnecessary motion in your hands. Don't post back with something like "But I have!" This takes years to master, if not the rest of your life. Every motion should be no larger than it has to be- your hands should almost look like they're not moving at all. The only way you can learn this is to play slowly enough that you are aware of every subtlety in how your hands move. Spend 10-20% of your time playing at your top speed, and 80-90% playing at half that.

Spend the other 100% playing music that you like. There's nothing as useless as a guitarist who can't spontaneously entertain some people with music.


ok so don't be scared by what this guy just said. it WONT take you the rest of your life to master the guitar/music. if you practice correctly and often it shouldn't take you too many years. 2-3-4
you should take half of your time trying to learn new theory, and training it. learning to hear too. http://www.musictheory.net is the place for all this.

the rest of the time you should spend practicing your playing. learn songs you like, improvise lots, do some exercises like arpeggios and whatnot.

edit: oh i didn't realize i had already posted here before xD
#6
Nobody's addressed the most important technique, though. For now, shelve sweeping, 8-finger tapping, fast legato and everything else. If you want to learn to shred, your alternate picking ability must be excellent. Work diligently on that first.
#7
Quote by :-D
Nobody's addressed the most important technique, though. For now, shelve sweeping, 8-finger tapping, fast legato and everything else. If you want to learn to shred, your alternate picking ability must be excellent. Work diligently on that first.


well yes of course. some chromatic exercises do wonders to picking synchronization with the fretting hand.
#8
Quote by :-D
Nobody's addressed the most important technique, though. For now, shelve sweeping, 8-finger tapping, fast legato and everything else. If you want to learn to shred, your alternate picking ability must be excellent. Work diligently on that first.

This. Alt. picking is the most fundamental technique in shreding. I'd also recommend working on economy picking as well.

~Taydr~
Ka pu te ruha ka hao te rangatahi.
#9
Quote by RCalisto
well yes of course. some chromatic exercises do wonders to picking synchronization with the fretting hand.

Make sure it's not always just a 1-2-3-4 pattern, though; you want to build synchronization, yes, but also promote finger independence. Do something like this:


e-----------------------------------------------------2-3-4-1---------
B------------------------------------------1-2-3-4--------------------
G-------------------------------4-1-2-3-------------------------------
D---------------------3-4-1-2-----------------------------------------
A-----------2-3-4-1---------------------------------------------------
E-1-2-3-4-------------------------------------------------------------



And break up that pattern as many ways as you can with different numbers of nps, different finger usage, etc. Something else that's important is to begin the exercise with the picking stroke opposite of what you normally start with. You'll be forced to make new neural connections and your playing will benefit greatly.
#10
Alternate picking, as already mentioned, is a must. Be sure to practice your outside picking (picking on the outside of the strings) as well as inside picking. And be sure you are able to play every lick at the same speed regarless of if you begin with a downstroke or upstroke.
"It is always advisable to be a loser if you cannot become a winner." - Frank Zappa

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