#1
I apologize if this has already been done or if I'm in the wrong sub-forum, but I couldn't find a place for microphone issues anywhere.

My band and I are looking at buying one or two mics for band practice and for laying down ideas on Garageband and etc. so we can essentially make the song-writing practice faster, more efficient, and make us tighter. We also need mics for vocals. We were looking at Shure SM57 (although if anybody recommends the SM58 more highly for vocals, let me know).

The problem is that any professional mic, including these, uses XLR outputs. What exactly can I plug them into, apart from a PA System and a Preamp? I need something that works for band practices and gigs and hate using cheap mics, so please help me out! The band doesn't have a PA System and they're probably far too expensive for us (we all have individual gear needs as well, let alone band needs). Any alternative options would be much appreciated.
#2
A direct box is an inexpensive way to turn XLR input (which allmost all mics will be) into 1/4 inch output.

For mics, I always reccomend the Sm57. A great all around mic for amps, instruments, and could be used for vocals if you needed.
Quote by ElMaco
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#4
Quote by boreamor
Get an SM58. If you take the caging off the said SM58, it becomes a SM57.


does it actually or does it only just look like an SM57? Because the specs would have to be the exact same...
#5
Quote by Nathan_393
does it actually or does it only just look like an SM57? Because the specs would have to be the exact same...


The specs aren't "exact" but the difference is practically negligable. I actually did that for my music tech coursework instead of using a proper SM57 for convenience and got the same effect. It's the most practical microphone you'll get at a decent price.

Only downside is that you'll need something to plug the XLR cables into. Normally that'd be a converted (XLR to 1/4") or an interface (Which is normally XLR to USB with gain control.)
#6
Quote by boreamor
The specs aren't "exact" but the difference is practically negligable. I actually did that for my music tech coursework instead of using a proper SM57 for convenience and got the same effect. It's the most practical microphone you'll get at a decent price.

Only downside is that you'll need something to plug the XLR cables into. Normally that'd be a converted (XLR to 1/4") or an interface (Which is normally XLR to USB with gain control.)


Everybody's responses have answered all my questions, much thanks!
#8
Quote by boreamor
You're welcome


Actually, I have another question:
If I get an XLR to 1/4" converter, is that going to affect the sound of the microphone at all and how so?
#9
does anybody know if i can set up my live sound like this:
guitar--direct box -- XRL straight to mic am i able to plug the mic right into the direct box
amp__/
also what input in the amp should i plug into from the DI box?
#10
I have 4 sm 58's. amazing mics. ones even wireless
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#11
Quote by hyroglyph!c
I have 4 sm 58's. amazing mics. ones even wireless

agreed, just bought my first SM58 this morning
#12
Quote by Nathan_393
Actually, I have another question:
If I get an XLR to 1/4" converter, is that going to affect the sound of the microphone at all and how so?


Hmm. Nothing that is noticeable to the human ear unless you get a bad connection.
#13
Quote by boreamor
Hmm. Nothing that is noticeable to the human ear unless you get a bad connection.


Perfect! Thanks mate!
#14
FYI, recording questions belong in the R&R section.

If you are looking to record you need an audio interface with XLR inputs and preamps. Any PA will have XLR inputs and preamps for each inputs channel.
The SM57 is a nice mic however the 58 is much better for vocals due to its pickup range.

You can run any xLR mic into a cable that will go to TRS however dont use an high end amp or turn it up too loud as its not good for the amp....
Last edited by moody07747 at Jul 15, 2008,