#1
Well, it doesn't really break. It just stretches. It's always the same string (my A string). It has been happening quite often, at least once a week. This never used to happen, I don't know what it could be. I had to get my old Yamaha out of the closet because I don't have any more A strings.






Sorry for the bad quality pics, I used my phone.
Last edited by Masonpwiley at Jul 11, 2008,
#2
Looks like a saddle or something on the bridge is sharp and is cutting the outer edge of the string... Might want to get your bridge checked out.
#4
that's weird, never seen anything like it. i'd put my money on something sharp on the bridge as said above. shouldn't be difficult to find, look for the point on the bridge where the string starts to stretch from.
I've been imitated so well I've heard people copy my mistakes.
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#5
Grab some fine sandpaper and lightly sand the saddle. Looks as if it is cutting the wire... Never seen anything like it!
Quote by Kensai


Awesome guy right here
#6
looks like it's breaking right at the saddle. check under the saddle and see if there is something sharpe under there. you also might try to raise or lower the saddle and see if that help's.
#7
Here's your fix:

Take an A string and run it really fast through the saddle, back and forth ( like a wire saw ). This is called burnishing the saddle, and will smooth out the rough stuff. Also, you might consider looking into Big Bends Nut Sauce. This is an amazing lubricant that will preserve string life and stabilize tuning.
#8
Quote by lumberjack
Here's your fix:

Take an A string and run it really fast through the saddle, back and forth ( like a wire saw ). This is called burnishing the saddle, and will smooth out the rough stuff. Also, you might consider looking into Big Bends Nut Sauce. This is an amazing lubricant that will preserve string life and stabilize tuning.

the survey says............ we got a winner......great answer!!!
#9
Quote by lumberjack
Here's your fix:

Take an A string and run it really fast through the saddle, back and forth ( like a wire saw ). This is called burnishing the saddle, and will smooth out the rough stuff. Also, you might consider looking into Big Bends Nut Sauce. This is an amazing lubricant that will preserve string life and stabilize tuning.

Whoever came up with that name is either retarded or a genius.

But yeah, that's happened to me once before... not repeatedly, though. I agree with the people saying to sand/grind down the top of the saddle, it seems like that's your problem.