#1
Hey guys, I'm starting to learn piano, and played guitar 2 years before now so I know my share of theory already and composing. But I usually just played by ear, or if in doubt looked up tabs, I've never really learned sheet music before. I'm self taught in anything I do, and I can't afford piano lessons so I thought I'd learn things by myself again.

I already have learned lots, just sheet music has me stuck on how to be read, anyone know a link or anything to recommend for me? Thanks in advance.
Quote by buddha
isnt there a law against not shaving? thats somewere in our constitution. i think it goes something like a girl maybe be a freak in the sheets but no be wild down stairs is treason and for that she will be beheaded.-good old Benjamin F.

#2
This is something my music teacher recommended for me
From the bottom of the stave
If a note is in a space remember F,A,C,E
If a note is on a line remember the rhyme (E)Every (G)Good (B)Boy (D)Deserves (F)Fun

hope this will help, its a bit confusing trying to explain it but it works for me

edit: oo youre from sweden, cool
you're english is fantastic
Last edited by Joe4/4/1992 at Jul 11, 2008,
#3
Quote by Joe4/4/1992
This is something my music teacher recommended for me
From the bottom of the stave
If a note is in a space remember F,A,C,E
If a note is on a line remember the rhyme (E)Every (G)Good (B)Boy (D)Deserves (F)Fun

hope this will help, its a bit confusing trying to explain it but it works for me

edit: oo youre from sweden, cool
you're english is fantastic



Thanks
Quote by buddha
isnt there a law against not shaving? thats somewere in our constitution. i think it goes something like a girl maybe be a freak in the sheets but no be wild down stairs is treason and for that she will be beheaded.-good old Benjamin F.

#4
There's a series of books, called Modern Method for Guitar (volumes 1, 2 and reading studies I believe) by William Leavitt. I recommend those.
The "Popped Collar" Award(Sexiest)
Elvenkindje

The "Rest In Real Life" Award(Best Past MT Mod)
Elvenkindje
#5
Quote by Joe4/4/1992
This is something my music teacher recommended for me
From the bottom of the stave
If a note is in a space remember F,A,C,E
If a note is on a line remember the rhyme (E)Every (G)Good (B)Boy (D)Deserves (F)Fun

hope this will help, its a bit confusing trying to explain it but it works for me

This only holds true for the treble clef though. In the bass clef the spaces are A, C, E, G (All Cows Eat Grass) and the lines are G, B, D, F, A (Good Boys Deserve Fun Always). One thing I learned when learning bass clef was that if it's in a space you put it up a space and down two octaves, or if it's on a line put it up a line and down to octaves and you have the equivalent in the treble clef. The treble clef and bass clef are all you need to know for playing the piano, but there are more clefs in use, which you won't need to worry about at this stage.

The most common note lengths or values are:
Semibreve, or Whole note, which looks like an unshaded circle somewhat like an o.
Minum, or Half note, which looks like a semibreve with a tail, a bit like a d.
Crotchet, or quarter note, which looks like a minum with the circle shaded in.
Quaver, or eighth note, which looks like a crotchet with a tail, if theres more than one of them in succession, then they will probably be connected with a bar instead of having tails.
Semiquaver, or sixteenth note, which looks like a quaver with an extra tail, or bar if joined together.

A dot after any note increases its value by half of the notes length. For example a minum with a dot after it is equal to a minum plus a crotchet (half of a minum).

I don't think I've missed out anything you need to get you started. If you have any more questions don't hesitate to ask or send me a PM.

EDIT: Key signatures and time signatures deserve a mention.

With key signatures if a space or line has a sharp you raise that note and its octaves a half tone and if it has a flat you lower it a half tone. Sharps look like this: #, and flats like this: b.

With time signatures the top number is the number of beats in a bar, while the bottom number is the type of beat. For example 4/4 means there are four beats per bar, and these beats are crotchet beats. 2/2 means 2 beats per bar and they are minum beats.

~Taydr~
Ka pu te ruha ka hao te rangatahi.
Last edited by Taydr at Jul 11, 2008,
#6
www.musictheory.net has all the basic information about reading music and trainers for identifying notes on the staff
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
Last edited by Ænimus Prime at Jul 11, 2008,
#7
If you're having problem naming notes, pick a random piece of sheet music, point to a random note, and say the note aloud, along with the note duration. It really helps in identifying. Also, learn to read in intervals. It's just the easiest way to read sheet music for the guitar, and I would think any instrument after that.
#8
Quote by Taydr
This only holds true for the treble clef though. In the bass clef the spaces are A, C, E, G (All Cows Eat Grass) and the lines are G, B, D, F, A (Good Boys Deserve Fun Always). One thing I learned when learning bass clef was that if it's in a space you put it up a space and down two octaves, or if it's on a line put it up a line and down to octaves and you have the equivalent in the treble clef. The treble clef and bass clef are all you need to know for playing the piano, but there are more clefs in use, which you won't need to worry about at this stage.

The most common note lengths or values are:
Semibreve, or Whole note, which looks like an unshaded circle somewhat like an o.
Minum, or Half note, which looks like a semibreve with a tail, a bit like a d.
Crotchet, or quarter note, which looks like a minum with the circle shaded in.
Quaver, or eighth note, which looks like a crotchet with a tail, if theres more than one of them in succession, then they will probably be connected with a bar instead of having tails.
Semiquaver, or sixteenth note, which looks like a quaver with an extra tail, or bar if joined together.

A dot after any note increases its value by half of the notes length. For example a minum with a dot after it is equal to a minum plus a crotchet (half of a minum).

I don't think I've missed out anything you need to get you started. If you have any more questions don't hesitate to ask or send me a PM.

EDIT: Key signatures and time signatures deserve a mention.

With key signatures if a space or line has a sharp you raise that note and its octaves a half tone and if it has a flat you lower it a half tone. Sharps look like this: #, and flats like this: b.

With time signatures the top number is the number of beats in a bar, while the bottom number is the type of beat. For example 4/4 means there are four beats per bar, and these beats are crotchet beats. 2/2 means 2 beats per bar and they are minum beats.

~Taydr~



This helped a LOT. Thank you so much
Quote by buddha
isnt there a law against not shaving? thats somewere in our constitution. i think it goes something like a girl maybe be a freak in the sheets but no be wild down stairs is treason and for that she will be beheaded.-good old Benjamin F.

#9
Quote by shakin'cakes
This helped a LOT. Thank you so much

Glad to help. I probably missed out something so if you come across anything else that I didn't cover don't hesitate to send me a PM.

~Taydr~
Ka pu te ruha ka hao te rangatahi.
#10
Threadstarter, are you learning to read sheet music period or just how to play guitar to it?

Or both(?!)
:stickpoke

Baby, if I were biscuits and you were gravy, I'd sop you up

FIGHT IGNORANCE

"I fear for my flesh, but I fear for my spirit even more..."
#12
Quote by Ænimus Prime
www.musictheory.net has all the basic information about reading music and trainers for identifying notes on the staff


i recommend nothing else.
i've learned to read music like a pro in less than a weak with those trainers. they are amazingly helpful.
#13
Quote by shakin'cakes
Hey guys, I'm starting to learn piano, and played guitar 2 years before now so I know my share of theory already and composing. But I usually just played by ear, or if in doubt looked up tabs, I've never really learned sheet music before. I'm self taught in anything I do, and I can't afford piano lessons so I thought I'd learn things by myself again.

I already have learned lots, just sheet music has me stuck on how to be read, anyone know a link or anything to recommend for me? Thanks in advance.

musictheory.net
This is a great site for you because it has a flash quiz where it asks shows you a note on the staff and you have to identify it. There are also lessons and more.

EDIT: above poster already mentioned. Oh well it is a very helpfull site.
#14
TS, have you had a look at any Grade 1 and 2 theory books?
These pretty much sum up sheet music perfectly.