#1
What is a ghost note and how is it played?

Example if your reading a tab and see this (7) on say the E string how would that be played?
#2
i think that means its an optional note
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#3
that is prly a harmonic or pinch harmonic for a harmonic just place your finger at the end of that frett but dont press down and play the srting u can let go though and the sound will continue for a pinch harmonic play one note on the 7th frett then immediately place ur thum on the string it will require a few tryis and try a few different places
I'd do me........

#5
a ghost note is a note that will haunt you and get you when you're asleep
#6
the closest thing i can think is a harmonic.
or maybe its a ghost bend, which you bend it before you actually strum it.
#7
Aaaagghh!

A ghost note is one that is played really lightly. More "implied" than anything else.
None of that "harmonic" garbage.
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#8
^ Him right. The rest, no.
A ghost note can also be referred to as a grace note or passing tone. They, alot of times, are just there because during the passage of the song that has it, for whatever reason, the musician made that note sound, and usually very faintly. At other times, they are used as a stepping stone that will lead into other notes. Have a look at Wiki and you might understand more.
Also, in order to hear them properly, crank up the volume. Most are so slight they get missed when listening at moderate volume levels. My car stereo does them justice tho. And it's only pushing out 1000 W. lol
#9
ghost note usually follows the same note, example:
7 (7)

which usually implies you can either just hold the first one,
or kind of "continue" the sound by playing it again lightly
██████████████████████████
████████████████████████
█████████████████████
██████████████████████
█████████████████████
██████████████████████████
██████████████████████████


LET'S GO BUCKS
#10
Quote by AeroRocker
ghost note usually follows the same note, example:
7 (7)

which usually implies you can either just hold the first one,
or kind of "continue" the sound by playing it again lightly


WINNER
#12
hmm i always thought (7) means you just mute the 7th fret w/ your fret hand?
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#13
ghost note means it's optional to play because it may or may not be there due to either low volume and may not be recognized by some players as to strum that note, or as in holding a note down and being optional to strum that note as so.

Q#m
e|--6--|
B|--5--|
G|--7--|
D|--7--|x2586
A|--5--|
E|-----|


Play until she breaks up with you.

The most brutal band to ever exist is...

You should go like them...even if you don't like them.


-Sloppyjoe24
Last edited by sloppyjoe24 at Jul 12, 2008,
#14
Depends how the the tabber tabbed it.
Most times it means optional note. You dont need to p[lay it.
Been away, am back
#15
Here's a video of John Mayer using them..

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iSM3FL7zUdw
I think you wil be able to tell which ones they are.
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#16
Quote by LeftyDave
^ Him right. The rest, no.
A ghost note can also be referred to as a grace note or passing tone. They, alot of times, are just there because during the passage of the song that has it, for whatever reason, the musician made that note sound, and usually very faintly. At other times, they are used as a stepping stone that will lead into other notes. Have a look at Wiki and you might understand more.
Also, in order to hear them properly, crank up the volume. Most are so slight they get missed when listening at moderate volume levels. My car stereo does them justice tho. And it's only pushing out 1000 W. lol
Isn't a grace note a whole different thing? I'm pretty sure its a very quick hammer-on. On sheet music it looks like a small quaver and it's beat is counted as part of the note which is hammered on. Am I wrong?
Last edited by leephan at Jul 13, 2008,