#1
My guitar teacher is teaching me music theory and has asked me to write some Dorian chord progressions! I have no idea how to do this! Please help!
#2
take a key, but start on the second chord of it (Ie, the dorian chord).
#3
Why don't you just ask your teacher to explain how it is done? That's what teachers are for
#6
One method is to find the modal note of the mode and make the progression using diatonic chords that contain the modal note aswell as the tonic chord. The modal note is the note that makes each mode different from its parallel major or minor scale (whichever the mode's closest to). In the case of Dorian the modal note is the 6 because it's parallel minor scale has a b6. In D dorian the modal note is B. The chords diatonic to the D Dorian mode that contain B are B dim, G maj and E min. The B dim chord couldn't really be used though because it will want to resolve to C major too much. So you have the chords D minor, E minor and G major (and their extensions) to work with.

However this is just one approach, you can use whatever chords you like that are diatonic to the Dorian mode as long as they resolve to Dorian.
#7
You have two basic options:

1: Keep smashing that dorian chord. (example: Impressions by John Coltrane)
2: Vamp a i7 - IV7 that keeps repeating. (example: Oye Como Va by Tito Puente)
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#8
well, i think it's caused by you not knowing your modes
i know it can all get a little confusing, it's pretty easy though,
write down all chords in the dorian mode, you just start with the I chord, and now move all notes up 1 note in the scale, and voila, the II chord, go on untill your back at the I (an octave up) and play down again, ans repeat the same thing with as many roots as you can untill you get fed up with it
now apply some common chord progressions to it, if you know none, google is your best friend.

although it's more common in a natural minor key, the before mentioned II V7 I would, in C dorian, result in Dm7 (if you add a 9th, it's just flat) G7 (a 13th would be flat) and Cm7 (you might want to have this C chord for 2 meassures)
or you can extend that turnaround to III VI II V7 I, giving Ebmaj7 Am7b5 Dm7 G7 (flat 13 if you like, in fact try it, i'm sure you'll like it) it's tackled with an altered scale if you want to impress your teacher
you can link the chords together with tritone substitutions (playing a dominant chord with the b5th of your current chord instead of it (for the last 1 or 2 beats of your meassure leading in to the next) so in the example of VI II V7 I it would give Am7-D#9 | Dm7-G#13 | G7b13-C#9 | Cm7-C13 | (i spiced up the voicings, i suggest you try them) or you just play every minor chord as a dominant chord on or 2 of the beats

now, there are numerous other progressions, which you're supposed to come up with, or choose from a list, yourself,
but if you still haven't had enough, take every chord you use and now move up all notes 1 chord tone so you just use the notes of that chord, in different positions, giving you the invertions (so a different note from the chord is your next bass note) be sure you know at all times where the root, 3rd, 5th and 7ths are.
now you can combine these inversions with your original ones
so for example you might play the original chord on the first 2 beats, play an inversion on the 3rd beat and the tritone on the 4th

anyway, goodluck, and be sure to play all yourprogressions in various keys
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#9
Start with your mode steps
Dorian = 1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7 8

Then build chords from the Mode

Triads built on the Dorian Mode = i ii III IV v vi˚ VII
(E.G. D Dorian triads = Dm Em F G Am B˚ C Dm)

Sevenths based on the Dorian Mode = imin7; iimin7; IIIMaj7; IV7; vmin7; viø7; VIImaj7

Now put these chords together in a way that makes the i chord feel like home.

Viola! You have just written a Dorian chord progression.
Si
#10
You have two objectives when writing a modal progression. Establish a tonal center and tonality based on it. In this case, you want to establish say, D as a tonal center and obviously a dorian tonality. To do this, you're going to need a tonic chord to establish the D as the tonal center and one or more chords to fill in the gaps. What separates D Dorian from the regular old D Minor is the B natural in D Dorian as opposed to the Bb in D Minor. Naturally, you're going to want at least one other chord that has the B in it, or of course, you'd end up with something too ambiguous to be D Dorian for sure. It's up to you which one to use, though the most commonly chosen is G. It's very helpful to know see the modes as alterations to the major or minor scale.
#11
Quote by ouchies
ii - V7 is really popular
That's not really wrong, but it isn't really right, either. While that would yield a Dm G7 progression (I=C) which is classic dorian, your goal is to establish D as the tonal center, which makes it i - IV7 rather than ii - V7.

Quote by 20Tigers
Start with your mode steps
Dorian = 1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7 8

Then build chords from the Mode

Triads built on the Dorian Mode = i ii III IV v vi˚ VII
(E.G. D Dorian triads = Dm Em F G Am B˚ C Dm)

Sevenths based on the Dorian Mode = imin7; iimin7; IIIMaj7; IV7; vmin7; viø7; VIImaj7

Now put these chords together in a way that makes the i chord feel like home.

Viola! You have just written a Dorian chord progression.
All true, however, the (really important) catch with modal progressions is that they are unstable and want to resolve to the relative major or minor (ie D Dorian is pulled to C or Am) if the progression becomes too complex. For that reason, modal progressions are typically simple.

Quote by grampastumpy
Naturally, you're going to want at least one other chord that has the B in it, or of course, you'd end up with something too ambiguous to be D Dorian for sure.
This isn't completely true. A static Dm7 chord certainly doesn't code specifically for D Dorian, but D Dorian would be the most common way to play over that.

Quote by Funkicker
(i spiced up the voicings, i suggest you try them)
Spicing up chords with extensions is fine, but you run the risk of destablizing the delicate modal tonality. 6-note chords often have a name better than the name you first think of, so it could sound like a different chord than you meant it to.
#13
Quote by bangoodcharlote
This isn't completely true. A static Dm7 chord certainly doesn't code specifically for D Dorian, but D Dorian would be the most common way to play over that.
Yeah, when there's anything being played over it, the chord progression doesn't have to be specific at all as the melody will probably fill in the tonal gaps. When it comes to writing just a chord progression though, you'll need the tonality spelled out for it to be there at all.

Also, D Dorian the most common thing to play over a static Dm7 chord? I would have thought it to be D Minor... Well actually D Dorian would eliminate the b9 between A and Bb and I imagine make it more consonant.
#14
Quote by grampastumpy
Also, D Dorian the most common thing to play over a static Dm7 chord? I would have thought it to be D Minor... Well actually D Dorian would eliminate the b9 between A and Bb and I imagine make it more consonant.
Natural minor wouldn't be the usual scale to play. Those would be D Dorian, Dm Pentatonic, and D Blues.
#15
While we're on the subject of modal music...

Is it ok to use ANY accidentals? As long as you don't make the piece want to go to the relative major/minor for a stronger resolution and the tonal center stays the same, is it alright?

I'm writing a song in E Phrygian b4: E, F, G, Ab, B, C, D and i want to use A natural in a couple parts. It sounds fine but i don't know if it goes against "modal writing" i guess.
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#16
Quote by metal4all
While we're on the subject of modal music...

Is it ok to use ANY accidentals? As long as you don't make the piece want to go to the relative major/minor for a stronger resolution and the tonal center stays the same, is it alright?

I'm writing a song in E Phrygian b4: E, F, G, Ab, B, C, D and i want to use A natural in a couple parts. It sounds fine but i don't know if it goes against "modal writing" i guess.



If you think it sounds right, it's right.
#17
Quote by bangoodcharlote
That's not really wrong, but it isn't really right, either. While that would yield a Dm G7 progression (I=C) which is classic dorian, your goal is to establish D as the tonal center, which makes it i - IV7 rather than ii - V7.



haha I was waiting for someone to correct me x]. After I posted it I was like, this is def wrong.
#18
If you think it sounds right, it's right.


That's not what he asked. You can play whatever you want, but words have definitions. Dorian is dorian, it's not lydian just because you want it to be.

take a key, but start on the second chord of it (Ie, the dorian chord).


It doesn't matter what chord you start on (it isn't called the "dorian chord" anyway). What matters is the tonal center.
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#19
Quote by metal4all
While we're on the subject of modal music...

Is it ok to use ANY accidentals? As long as you don't make the piece want to go to the relative major/minor for a stronger resolution and the tonal center stays the same, is it alright?

I'm writing a song in E Phrygian b4: E, F, G, Ab, B, C, D and i want to use A natural in a couple parts. It sounds fine but i don't know if it goes against "modal writing" i guess.


Everything is "okay". Music theory isn't law.
#20
Quote by Archeo Avis
That's not what he asked. You can play whatever you want, but words have definitions. Dorian is dorian, it's not lydian just because you want it to be.
It would only be a couple accidentals. It would go from Phrygian b4 to regular Phrygian and then back. But the entire thing is still based off Phrygian b4.


^That's true but I want to see what's considered "acceptable" when it comes to writing modally.
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#21
Everything is "okay". Music theory isn't law.


It isn't law, it's descriptive. What he's asking is if it could still be described as modal if it uses accidentals. Why is this hard to understand?
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#22
Quote by metal4all
It would only be a couple accidentals. It would go from Phrygian b4 to regular Phrygian and then back. But the entire thing is still based off Phrygian b4.


^That's true but I want to see what's considered "acceptable" when it comes to writing modally.


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He doesn't understand me.

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I reiterate.... if it sounds good to you it's fine.
#24
Quote by RichieJovie
He doesn't like me.

He doesn't understand me.

He's a bit of a willy.

I reiterate.... if it sounds good to you it's fine.
I think he's asking "Is it still phrygian?" rather than "Is it okay?". Naturally you can do whatever you want in music.

IMO, I'd still consider it phrygian.
#25
^^(To RichiJovie)Lol, I know but I want to see if it's considered "modal/non-key based" still. I'm not going to change the music but it WILL decide how the music is described.


Edit: ^Thanks for your input. I always enjoy it.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#26
Quote by metal4all
^Lol, I know but I want to see if it's considered "modal/non-key based" still. I'm not going to change the music but it WILL decide how the music is described.
Directed at me? Well regardless, I guess going by the classical definition of modes(which I'm not really familiar with myself TBH), it might not be, but if you've established the tonal center and have all the important Phrygian notes established(m2, m3, etc.) it would definitely still carry a Phrygian tonality more than anything else.