#1
I'm working on improvising solos and all but I dunno how to time it, when the solo ends and such.

Sorry if this sounds vague..

Help, though? Thanks.
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Takamine Gs330S
Fender Standard Stratocaster
Ibanez RG3EXQM1
Epiphone SG G-310

Amps:
Crate Palomino V16

Pedals
Ibanez TS9DX
Line 6 Tonecore Uber Metal
#2
Give me the chord changes please and I'll post a few tips and tricks to make your improv sound like a good solo.
#3
End it when you feel it.
In my opinion improvisation isn't something that thought should be put into, it's all about feeling, obviously skill is a factor to an extent, but you just gotta let your hands lead and your mind follow, when your hands and soul want to end, you end.
#4
Well the song I'm talking about is SRV's Pride and Joy. Instead of copying his solo note-for-note it'd be better to throw in some improv, I think.
Gear:

Guitars:
Takamine Gs330S
Fender Standard Stratocaster
Ibanez RG3EXQM1
Epiphone SG G-310

Amps:
Crate Palomino V16

Pedals
Ibanez TS9DX
Line 6 Tonecore Uber Metal
#5
I learned to play blues by soloing over SRV songs. I just learned to always end each set of 12 bars on a E note, then learned out to get it to flow.
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#6
Well, the first tip I can give you is to learn his solo by ear. Work it out really well. People are going to bash me for saying this, but you have to work out solos by ear, not with music or tabs. This is because once you hear a note, that note is yours, just like your root note is your home base.


If you can see a fret, and sing the note, it's yours and if you can hear a chord and sing something over it, if what you sing is yours, you'll be able to improvise WELL, not just wank around in key.


As for Pride and Joy, I don't know the tune but seeing it's Stevie it's probably a straight blues. Well get a blues backing track and start playing the root of each chord. When you've got this down, take the thirds, do the same. Then the sevenths of each chord.


Once you can do this, over each chord play the corresponding scale, depending on your level you could be using mixolydian(temporarily, *crossses fingers to avoid semantic debate*) or you can use the key's minor pentatonic the whole way through. Sing the scale and make sure you hear every note over each chord. We don't want 1000 notes, we want an honest one, that fits, that you can hear, that we want to hear. Do you understand what I'm getting at?


The blues has it's tension points, important parts which demand resolution, listen to some classic simple blues, preferably some slow blues, listen out for these places where the music builds up a lot of tension and then relaxes. You'll get this sensation from experience, so play around using those tips from about and see if you can find those tension/resolution relations.


#7
Eh, you basically lost me at the second part.. but I see where you're getting at, learning solos by ear. What if it's not perfect?
Gear:

Guitars:
Takamine Gs330S
Fender Standard Stratocaster
Ibanez RG3EXQM1
Epiphone SG G-310

Amps:
Crate Palomino V16

Pedals
Ibanez TS9DX
Line 6 Tonecore Uber Metal
#8
It has to be perfect, every accent, every note, everything has to be identical to the original soloist. Some people might think that's stupid or unoriginal, but when you're improvising, accurate transcribing has trained your ears and your fingers to play properly.


So just take it slowly, a few bars at a time, don't worry if it takes a while, there's no rush.
#9
All right, thanks a lot. I'll try it. I know his solo(s?) are in E minor pentatonics, I think.
Gear:

Guitars:
Takamine Gs330S
Fender Standard Stratocaster
Ibanez RG3EXQM1
Epiphone SG G-310

Amps:
Crate Palomino V16

Pedals
Ibanez TS9DX
Line 6 Tonecore Uber Metal
#10
I agree with confusius. You really need to work on transcribing by ear. It's much more beneficial in the long run, even if it seems slow at first.

After, and only after you have done that, should you begin to improvise over the song.
"It is always advisable to be a loser if you cannot become a winner." - Frank Zappa

The name's Garrett.

Gear and stuff:
Taylor 310
American Strat w/ Texas Specials
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Dr. Z Maz 18 JR NR