#1
I've been playing bass for about 3 years or so and I decided to give a shot at composing songs. I've been trying for months to come up with some riffs that actually sound good and original, so I made some riffs. The problem is that they all sound the same and have very similar finger patterns. So I ask you guys, how do you compose pieces of music and think of what to play without having the exact same sound for every single riff you make? I've heard things about applying scales/theroy to your music, but I just cant figure it out without making it sound horrible or sounding the same. Any answers?
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#2
Most important idea to composing: Listen to bands that aren't in the same genre. This way you will hear different kinds of riffs.

Then get the guitar tabs for the songs and study it, recognizing and remembering different techniques.

Then apply your own ideas to those techniques, create a few of your own techniques, and compose.
#3
It's simple. Write, write, write, write, write. Don't stop writing. It helps you to distinguish between many similar fills and riffs that can be used in the same song, and special riffs that deserve their own section, or potentially a completely different song.

The best musicians have more ideas than they know what to do with, and it's from practicing and composing repeatedly.
#4
Oh cool. I play bass too!
Due to physical limitations of certain instruments, however, I would suggest starting out on maybe the guitar or piano to pick out a few melodies in your head. Then work that onto the bass because it can really bring out the brilliance of whatever your working on.

In terms of composition, I've been doing mostly classical contemporary since I was 6. Put something up and maybe I can help you.
Try manipulating your scales and use rythmic modulation to make it sound interesting; those are universal laws, I think.

Anyway, I hope I helped.
#5
Quote by akikobleu
Oh cool. I play bass too!
Due to physical limitations of certain instruments, however, I would suggest starting out on maybe the guitar or piano to pick out a few melodies in your head. Then work that onto the bass because it can really bring out the brilliance of whatever your working on.

In terms of composition, I've been doing mostly classical contemporary since I was 6. Put something up and maybe I can help you.
Try manipulating your scales and use rythmic modulation to make it sound interesting; those are universal laws, I think.

Anyway, I hope I helped.


Thats a good idea about writing with a guitar or paino. Ill give that a try with guitar (I cant play paino ) Thanks man
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Quote by GuitarHero0715
The most ****ed up thing a woman can to do a man is give your d!ck an indian burn, or bite it off.


Only bassist of the Bass Militia PM Nutter_101 to join
#6
Another component is... are you trying to pull off Pastorius stuff on the bass, or something that could back up a band? I've always said that composition and the process is the same for everything, but you have to be in a mindset to write a certain type of music.

If you want to do melodic bass, look up Jaco Pastorius, Victor Wooten, Michael Manring: these are just a few very basic and in a way "stereotypical" melodic bass players. YouTube can be very inspiring.

Start simple. That's the best start. Immerse yourself in something that motivates and inspires you, then tweak those ideas in your own way to begin with.