#1
Which scale do I use to improvise with Knockin' On Heaven's Door with this chord sequence?

G D Am


Thanks
#2
G major is the obvious choice. You could also probably get away with G minor pentatonic or blues scale aswell.
#4
use G mixolydian if u wanna be a bit adventurous. Otherwise go with what Eirien said.
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#6
Well the guns n roses version is tuned down half a step, so if you can't be arsed tuning down play the aforementioned scales in F# instead of G.
#7
No you're right i really can't be bothered, but what I mean is which type of scale are they using? And which type of scale is being used in the Tom Petty and Bob Dylan version? Basically, which notes in the scale should I hover around?
#8
Just use your ears, you'll be able to hear the notes they're resolving on.
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#9
Quote by Cachao
Which scale do I use to improvise with Knockin' On Heaven's Door with this chord sequence?

G D Am


Thanks


Isn't it

|G D |Am|
|G D | C |

Go with the Dylan version - much respect to Slash's style and G'N'R but Dylan is one of the most covered artists around and IMO the best songwriter alive today.

Jam to the chord progression but try writing a solo as well as just improvising. Also don't just noodle play with purpose and try to target tones from the chord that's sounding at the time. Be aware of the underlying harmony and make sure your solo fits with what's happening. The easiest way to do this is to use chord tones.
Si
#10
G mixolydian isn't a great idea to be honest, apart from the fact that the song isn't modal. You're best off using G major.


Also don't just noodle play with purpose and try to target tones from the chord that's sounding at the time. Be aware of the underlying harmony and make sure your solo fits with what's happening. The easiest way to do this is to use chord tones.



#12
Quote by 20Tigers
Isn't it

|G D |Am|
|G D | C |

Go with the Dylan version - much respect to Slash's style and G'N'R but Dylan is one of the most covered artists around and IMO the best songwriter alive today.

Jam to the chord progression but try writing a solo as well as just improvising. Also don't just noodle play with purpose and try to target tones from the chord that's sounding at the time. Be aware of the underlying harmony and make sure your solo fits with what's happening. The easiest way to do this is to use chord tones.


Yes it is that chord sequence, but when I started this thread I wasn't quite with it (late night)!
Definitely agree with what you are saying about the Dylan version, but my favourite is him and Tom Petty on Dueling Banjos
So are you basically saying try to use the notes from the chords beneath what I am playing at the time?
What do you mean by underlying harmony? Are you talking about the tune or chord or something else?

Thanks for the info
#13
Quote by ouchies
G Major pentatonic would probably be a better choice, unless you are playing over a G7, which you aren't.

Very true.
#14
Quote by ouchies
G Major pentatonic would probably be a better choice, unless you are playing over a G7, which you aren't.


Well I just tried it out with minor pentatonic, it sounded a little bit odd at first but it's doable. I wouldn't play the whole solo like that, just maybe a little bit if I wanted a bluesier vibe, which is what I think Slash did in his version (but I cba listening).

Quote by Cachao

So are you basically saying try to use the notes from the chords beneath what I am playing at the time?
What do you mean by underlying harmony? Are you talking about the tune or chord or something else?


Yeah chord tones on the strong beats works great. You've gotta really pay attention to what you're playing though. Practicing with a metronome helps this.

The underlying harmony is basically the chord you're playing over and how it functions.
#15
Quote by Eirien
Well I just tried it out with minor pentatonic, it sounded a little bit odd at first but it's doable. I wouldn't play the whole solo like that, just maybe a little bit if I wanted a bluesier vibe, which is what I think Slash did in his version (but I cba listening).



I dunno, it just doesn't sound good to me. Its not really bluesy because hes not playing over a bluesy progression, but I guess to each his own.
#16
Nah the Minor Pentatonic doesnt sound right. I was dicking around with it earlier and whilst there were some notes tht sounded good, it was difficult making any good sounding solo from it. Stick with Major scale or Major Pent.
#17
Quote by Eirien
G major is the obvious choice. You could also probably get away with G minor pentatonic or blues scale aswell.


G minor pent? You're brave.

Bb against the A min and the B of the G is a brave move and the F against the F# in the D requires some large plums as well.
#18
Yeah thanks I agree but earlier I did get something out of the minor pent but the major is so much better for it.
#19
Those chords totally spell out G major. Thus, use G major. As to what notes to use, the safest notes you have are your chord tones. It's always important to know how your playing sounds in relation to the chord you're playing over. Knowing how each note in the keys sounds over each chord in the key is what you want to aim for and will open up plenty of harmonic and melodic possibilities. This must be achieved through experience. Ear training, jamming over backing tracks, or with other people even( ), all that fun stuff.
Last edited by grampastumpy at Jul 13, 2008,
#21
That's a cool vid. I like how they are just about to bring full sound on and Dylan puts his hand back to hold them off so he can finish blowing on his harmonica.
Si
#22
Quote by grampastumpy
Those chords totally spell out G major. Thus, use G major. As to what notes to use, the safest notes you have are your chord tones. It's always important to know how your playing sounds in relation to the chord you're playing over. Knowing how each note in the keys sounds over each chord in the key is what you want to aim for and will open up plenty of harmonic and melodic possibilities. This must be achieved through experience. Ear training, jamming over backing tracks, or with other people even(:eek, all that fun stuff.

yup, that's pretty much what I meant...you just went to the trouble of actually explaining it
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#23
Quote by Cachao
Yes, that works but I still can't get that type of Bob Dylan and Tom Petty version opening solo like on this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gA5fOBYlBNI
Wow, I can't believe I forgot to mention pentatonics. Feel free to use the G major pentatonic to get a more traditional, rocky sound like them. You can also think of it as G major without the 4th and 7th(C and F#), which are more or less the tension notes in a major key leaving you only with a fairly consonant set of notes. Also feel free to shove in some Bb's. The minor third is the "blue" note in a major key, and helps get a bluesy sound. To start off with, try bending an A to a Bb or a Bb to a B.
Quote by steven seagull
yup, that's pretty much what I meant...you just went to the trouble of actually explaining it
Eh, I do what I can.
Last edited by grampastumpy at Jul 13, 2008,
#24
Well what you can do has really helped, thank you; I'll go and try that.
Last edited by Cachao at Jul 15, 2008,
#25
Quote by Eirien
You could also probably get away with G minor pentatonic or blues scale aswell.
Maybe you can get away with them, but the b3 and b7 are typically played in a bluesy, dom7 (or of course a minor key) setting.
#27
Pay attention to what's going on in the chord progressions as well. Note the most tones our ears pick out the easiest are the highest and lowest. The bass in this is pretty much the same as the chords -
|G D| C |
|G D| A |

but the high notes because of the open chords follow a repetitive descending pattern
|G F#| E |
|G F#| E |
Anyway just thought I'd throw that into the mix.

I believe the better you understand the harmonies the better your melodic improv will be.
Si