#1
if you have some chords how do you now in wich scale you can improvise.....
Gear:
Dean Cemetery Gates Razorback
MXR Dime Distortion
Dunlop Crybaby From Hell
ISP Decimator
EH LPB-1
Peavey 6505
D'addario strings, DR strings
Dunlop picks
#2
Generally, the first chord in the progression is the tonic chord - also known as the 'root' of a scale.
If the tonic chord is G, try improvising in some G scales. However, there are some exceptions to this theory.
#3
Quote by lotsofvolume
Generally, the first chord in the progression is the tonic chord - also known as the 'root' of a scale.
If the tonic chord is G, try improvising in some G scales. However, there are some exceptions to this theory.

ow great thnx !!!!!
Gear:
Dean Cemetery Gates Razorback
MXR Dime Distortion
Dunlop Crybaby From Hell
ISP Decimator
EH LPB-1
Peavey 6505
D'addario strings, DR strings
Dunlop picks
#4
Quote by Kriske11
ow great thnx !!!!!

No problem. See what it sounds like.

I'd recommend learning where and when to use Blues/Minor/Major/Pentatonic etc. scales in your solos. It makes a lot of difference in the feel you are aiming for.
#5
Quote by lotsofvolume
No problem. See what it sounds like.

I'd recommend learning where and when to use Blues/Minor/Major/Pentatonic etc. scales in your solos. It makes a lot of difference in the feel you are aiming for.

so you can place different like g major c major and so on in the same solo
Gear:
Dean Cemetery Gates Razorback
MXR Dime Distortion
Dunlop Crybaby From Hell
ISP Decimator
EH LPB-1
Peavey 6505
D'addario strings, DR strings
Dunlop picks
#6
Basically you would write out the notes of all the chords in the progression to see what scales fit. Let's use a G C D progression for an example.
So that's
G maj - G B D
C maj - C E G
D maj - D F# A

It's important to know what chord the progression resolves to. In this case it's G. Then you would figure out what G scales contain those notes. The G major scale contains all those notes so that's a good starting point. G major is G A B C D E F# G.

There's other options, but get used to playing diatonically (within the scale) first. You'll no doubt encounter progressions that don't stick to one scale, but you should start with the basics first. Look for the crusade lessons in the 'columns' section of this site for more info.

Edit; This is the link for the first of those Crusade lessons, I really recommend working your way through them.
Last edited by Eirien at Jul 12, 2008,
#7
Quote by Eirien
Basically you would write out the notes of all the chords in the progression to see what scales fit. Let's use a G C D progression for an example.
So that's
G maj - G B D
C maj - C E G
D maj - D F# A

It's important to know what chord the progression resolves to. In this case it's G. Then you would figure out what G scales contain those notes. The G major scale contains all those notes so that's a good starting point. G major is G A B C D E F# G.

There's other options, but get used to playing diatonically (within the scale) first. You'll no doubt encounter progressions that don't stick to one scale, but you should start with the basics first. Look for the crusade lessons in the 'columns' section of this site for more info.

Edit; This is the link for the first of those Crusade lessons, I really recommend working your way through them.

ok thnx great !!!!!
Gear:
Dean Cemetery Gates Razorback
MXR Dime Distortion
Dunlop Crybaby From Hell
ISP Decimator
EH LPB-1
Peavey 6505
D'addario strings, DR strings
Dunlop picks