#1
hey all im really new/dumb to musical theory lol and i have a question, when trying to solo for example say the song was in A minor, using a pentatonic scale is the only positions your able to use to solo on that song the position at the 17th fret (low E string) and on the 5th fret (low E string) or are there what i think are relative notes where, its a different note but essenstially the same note if that makes any sence, or if someone could direct me to a good place that has a lesson on this sort of thing it would be greatly appreciated
Gear


- Epiphone Les Paul
- SX Strat (w/ Fender Vintage Noisless Pickups, TBX Control, and an active circuit board for +25dB mid boost)
- Marshall DSL40C
#2
If you look at the notes in the A minor pentatonic scales you're using, A - C - D - E - G. You can use these notes anywhere on the fretboard, you are not limited to just using them in the minor pentatonic patterns you have learnt.
#3
Forgive me if im wrong but are you implying that you can only solo at the tonic note of the song your in?

No, the music theory buffs will come in in a second and say "Scales not boxes etc" BUT try soloing for example a fifth (just because its the nicest interval behind octaves and consonant notes) up from the tonic key of the song.

So if your songs in A try creating a pentatonic box based on D# (good little theory exercise)EDIT: ...Fifths seven semis...? ive gotten a bit hazy all of a sudden. Then from there create a major scale with it (expanding learning)

Just doing it now on a piano it has a pretty classical sound to it. Might do that myself...
Last edited by RedFez64 at Jul 12, 2008,
#4
Quote by Johnljones7443
If you look at the notes in the A minor pentatonic scales you're using, A - C - D - E - G. You can use these notes anywhere on the fretboard, you are not limited to just using them in the minor pentatonic patterns you have learnt.


are you saying you can use the A-C-D-E-G scales or just find those notes on the fretboard and use them in soloing too?
Gear


- Epiphone Les Paul
- SX Strat (w/ Fender Vintage Noisless Pickups, TBX Control, and an active circuit board for +25dB mid boost)
- Marshall DSL40C
#5
^The latter. If you want to use the A minor pentatonic scale (the notes A - C - D - E - G), then yes, find those notes all over the fretboard and use them too, not just the notes you're restricted to in the finger patterns you're using.
#6
ahh i see thank you for your help on this. just a little further help though for when i use those notes elsewhere on the fretboard, are you able to use any notes around them too, cause what i'm used to doing is playing in a penatonic shape, and i tend to use a combination of those notes for a little while, for example

E |--5--8-- on the G,B, and e strings i will tend to go back and forth with
A |--5--7-- those notes for a little riff. so what i'm asking i guess is when i
D |--5--7-- find these other notes on the board and i able to do the same
G |--5--7-- sort of thing, like play say a A note on the 10th fret B string can i
B |--5--8-- around on the "e" string or is it very regimental and can only stick
e |--5--8 to the notes in the scale? hopefully i kind of explained what im
talking about well enough lol


NVM i answered my own question by just playing around and testing out what i was talking about lol sweet, so correct me if im wrong here when playing in A you can use the A scale the 10th and 13th frets on the B string, the 10th and 12th frets on the "e" string, and the octave A scale at the 17th fret low E string?
Gear


- Epiphone Les Paul
- SX Strat (w/ Fender Vintage Noisless Pickups, TBX Control, and an active circuit board for +25dB mid boost)
- Marshall DSL40C
Last edited by Led Head at Jul 12, 2008,
#7
Quote by RedFez64
Forgive me if im wrong but are you implying that you can only solo at the tonic note of the song your in?

No, the music theory buffs will come in in a second and say "Scales not boxes etc" BUT try soloing for example a fifth (just because its the nicest interval behind octaves and consonant notes) up from the tonic key of the song.

So if your songs in A try creating a pentatonic box based on D# (good little theory exercise)EDIT: ...Fifths seven semis...? ive gotten a bit hazy all of a sudden. Then from there create a major scale with it (expanding learning)

Just doing it now on a piano it has a pretty classical sound to it. Might do that myself...


The fifth of A is E...


E is the perfect fifth and D# would be the augmented fourth
#8
@Led Head: Yes, but don't get restricted just to those two strings. Find all of the patterns the entire neck and on all of the strings. Understand how they overlap, and play around with all of them.
"It is always advisable to be a loser if you cannot become a winner." - Frank Zappa

The name's Garrett.

Gear and stuff:
Taylor 310
American Strat w/ Texas Specials
Ibanez JS1000
Vox Wah (true bypass & LED mod)
Dr. Z Maz 18 JR NR
Last edited by Iron_Dude at Jul 12, 2008,
#9
Don't play patterns on different places on the neck, play notes from the scales all over the fretboard.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#10
Okay, I really don't want to get into a pointless disscussion on scales vs. patterns, so I'll just give my fifty cents and never post in this thread again. A pattern is an arrangement of notes from a scale in one set posistion on the fretboard. I believe you should learn your patterns all over the fretboard so you can look at it as a whole and say, "okay, I know that I can play an A minor pentatonic scale all over the neck." Learning patterns just breaks the scale down into digestable chunks for easier use during improvisation and composition.
"It is always advisable to be a loser if you cannot become a winner." - Frank Zappa

The name's Garrett.

Gear and stuff:
Taylor 310
American Strat w/ Texas Specials
Ibanez JS1000
Vox Wah (true bypass & LED mod)
Dr. Z Maz 18 JR NR