#1
ok i think this goes in here anyway, i have a ampeg SVT classic all tube head. and well i took out all the tubes to replace them but i saw through one of the holes that a wire was pulled out so i took out the 8 screws holding down the plate where the tubes go and under it there is a green circut board one the bottom with like 10 small pin things sticking up in two rows then on top there is another green circut board with this cap that matches the little pins and i know that it has to go onto them to work again. well i had my hand in there and was doing this but my hand sliped and i touched the green bored and it shocked me and it hurt. so i though that it all was gone so i tryed to put the thing back on again but again it shocked me. so by now i though it must be gone so i had my brother try it and the mother shocked him 3 times!! so now me and my brother have been shocked 5 times in total. is there anyway that i can get this to stop happening. like if i let it sit over night unpluged will all the electricity come out of it and not hurt me???
#2
Guess youve never seen the simpsons episode with the electric cupcake lisa left out for bart. Caps can hold very dangerous amounts of electricity for days. Unplugging doesnt drain em.
#3
I have an idea... take a shower then grab a fork...
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introduce her to the back of your hand.
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Backhand = Discipline
Palm hand = Abuse

#5
Whenever you work on an amp, it's essential for safety that you drain the caps before touching anything. Here's what you've got to do. Put on some rubber soled shoes. Put on some safety glasses. Get a long screwdriver with an insulated handle. Then you need to locate the capacitors (caps for short).
Hold only the handle of the screwdriver (make sure your body is touching nothing metal!) and touch the screwdriver to both the positive lead of the capacitor and to the metal chassis of the amp at the same time. If you can't figure out which side is positive, then just do both leads to be safe. Hold it there for a few seconds. This allows the current stored in the capacitor to flow to ground (the chassis). It may spark and/or make a popping sound when you do this.

The better way to do it is to use a bleeding resistor instead of the screwdriver which allows the electricity to exit the cap more slowly, but if that is too complicated for you, the screwdriver will work.
#6
Quote by cedricsmods
Whenever you work on an amp, it's essential for safety that you drain the caps before touching anything. Here's what you've got to do. Put on some rubber soled shoes. Put on some safety glasses. Get a long screwdriver with an insulated handle. Then you need to locate the capacitors (caps for short).
Hold only the handle of the screwdriver (make sure your body is touching nothing metal!) and touch the screwdriver to both the positive lead of the capacitor and to the metal chassis of the amp at the same time. If you can't figure out which side is positive, then just do both leads to be safe. Hold it there for a few seconds. This allows the current stored in the capacitor to flow to ground (the chassis). It may spark and/or make a popping sound when you do this.

The better way to do it is to use a bleeding resistor instead of the screwdriver which allows the electricity to exit the cap more slowly, but if that is too complicated for you, the screwdriver will work.

Your method is just as dangerous as what the TS did. Using a screw driver will cause a huge voltage surge that will hit the chassis. You touch the chassis, your fu cked.
#7
Quote by kurtlives91
Your method is just as dangerous as what the TS did. Using a screw driver will cause a huge voltage surge that will hit the chassis. You touch the chassis, your fu cked.


Which is why bleeding them with a resistor is better, as I said. I didn't make clear enough that the chassis could still hurt you with the screwdriver method. Thanks for clarifying.