#1
Alright, I'll start by saying I already can read music, and have been playing classical piano for about 8 years; but, is it worth it to figure out how to apply this to guitar? I've been playing guitar for almost 2 years, using only tabs and occasional YouTube videos, and I'm wondering if I should start learning to read sheet music for guitar.

Any suggestions?
#2
It depends. If you're playing rock or blues, you probably won't need to know how to read. If you're playing jazz or classical guitar you probably should though.....

Regardless or what you play though it would be good to know
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#3
Can't be a bad idea. In fact I would say it's rather a good one. Go for it.

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#5
Yeah, at the moment, I'm only playing rock and blues, but would like to eventually learn more classical or neo-classical stuff on the guitar.

For anyone that can read music for guitar, how long did it take to learn?
#6
YES! you shouldn't need a reason, just do it!
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#7
if u can play piano well, get like cool stuff like rolling stones symphony for the devil and translate the piano part to guitar and stuff like that. thats a good reason to learn to read music for guitar, stuff like that.
#8
Yeah, I actually just did that the other day with Moondance by Van Morrison
But, I've done a lot of the stuff the other way, getting the guitar part to piano... Master of Puppets on piano doesn't have the same effect...
#9
Quote by Lrn2play
if u can play piano well, get like cool stuff like rolling stones symphony for the devil and translate the piano part to guitar and stuff like that. thats a good reason to learn to read music for guitar, stuff like that.


sympathy for the devil

and i cant see why it would hurt to learn
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#11
Quote by _brandon
no learning to read music is unnessary



I hope you're being sarcastic; it's not necessary to some, but there's no downside and if you want to be involved in studying music at a school it's essential.
#12
yes, you'll thank ME for it
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#13
Quote by amcrambler
sympathy for the devil

and i cant see why it would hurt to learn

actually they switched around the name between the two
#14
Really depends. If you want to make a living in music outside of playing in a band(session player, teaching, etc.), it'll be pretty much a must as far as I know. Also, if you are ever interested in playing jazz or classical of course, it's also a must there.

I was a classical pianist for 5 years before starting guitar, and just about in the same boat as you, didn't pay attention to reading till a while into my playing. If you're familiar with your fretboard, reading won't come too hard. The only thing is that you have potentially 6(more realistically 2 or 3) places to play the exact same note, so it'll take a little time to judge quick enough to sight read.
#15
For those who know, what are the benefits and how do you learn?
Is knowing stuff the like the D chord and E chord cover it? Or is there ALOT more out there?
#16
Alright, thanks everybody. Yeah, my biggest bit of confusion so far is that there are multiple places to play the same note on the fretboard. Other than that, I think I'll be able to get it, or at least a good start.
#17
Yes there are different places to play a particular note on the fretboard, but the context of music before and after it (chords or melody/solo lines) determines where you should play that note.
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#18
Only if you want to
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#19
Quote by :-D
Yes, learn to read music. There is no harm in doing so, yet there are many benefits.



yea there is, takes too much time. I would focus on theory.
#20
Quote by Findinghomer
yea there is, takes too much time. I would focus on theory.

Good God no, because "too much time" makes no sense at all. It takes as much of your time as you determine, and you'll get out what you put in.

Theory is important, but so is well-rounded musicianship.
#21
Learn to read sheet music. Be above the majority of guitarists who don't and flaunt it in their face. But seriously, it may take you a year or two to get decent at it, and you'll thank yourself in the long run. Educating yourself never hurts.
#22
wow! it's a great idea. I would suggest for you to learn classical music
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#23
I recommend Guitar Freak Workstation with SightReader Master.
It's totally adjustable to the users level and works on reading notes with rhythms. I've looked around and there's nothing for guitar or bass software that deals with sight-reading but this. The download site with some info is www.prolevelguitar.com
PS it does chords and a swing function for jazz as well. From what I can see, you can upgrade the software to a whole bunch of tools I haven't seen before... there's some videos on them.
#24
It took me about a year to get decent at it, I'm not amazing at it because I don't really use it that much. I use it when playing classical music though, helps a lot for that. There are no downsides to learning it because you can just slip it in 30 mins a day or even less and still get pretty good at it.
#26
If you see yourself in a situation where it will be necessary, then it's a must-learn skill.

If you see yourself playing with friends, jamming, rockin' out, and the like, your peers likely won't be using that notation, so it would be unnecessary to learn; you could devote that time to something else, music related or not.

That first post is basically a "/thread" kind of post.