#1
Hola fellow acousticans:

Looking to buy a medium price ukulele, only one store near me has a website and there range is cheap $25 probly ply begginer thing or $300+ real deal.

I just want it for fun but i want a nice sound also so is there anything wrong with the cheapo?

Also sizes and any info u have to offer?
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#2
Try the lanakai ukes. They're medium priced and play well. Also, if you want to play like advanced pieces of music on it and actually master the instrument instead of just learning the chords to somewhere over the rainbow, get a "tenor" ukulele. It has a longer neck but with the standard tuning. That is the size that is used by the likes of jake shimabukuro and the other ukulele masters.
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#3
I play one of these:

http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/Lanikai-LU21C-Concert-Ukulele?sku=512521

Those high-priced ukes really sound great, but I like to carry mine around so I prefer something that requires a little less care so I went with a laminate. It sounds good and once the strings strech out and settle in, it stays in tune and the intonation is pretty good.

There are four main sizes of uke starting from the smallest -- soprano, concert, tenor and baritone. A baritone uke is pretty guitar player-friendly because it is tuned like the first four strings of a guitar. Personally, I prefer the concert and tenor sizes because you get that ukulele sound along with a more comfortale size. You can also buy six and eight string ukes in the tenor size -- the six string is really a unique sound.

For $25 I wouldn't say there's anything wrong with that uke, but you may not be happy with how well it plays in tune, but if you just want to get the feel for it, it should be great. Depending on what you want to do with it, and how much you want to fuss over its care the high priced ukes are well worth it. Koa is the preferred wood for quality ukes, but you get a good sound from mahogany at a more reasonable price.
#5
I would recommend not to totally cheap out. I think spending in the 50-100$ range will probably get you a uke you'l be quite satisfied with.

I paid about $65 for mine. Its a concert size Mahalo, and is great for what I wanted, which is just a cool little uke to jam out with friends.
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