#1
hey guys,

ok here is my problem. i've been playing for about 3 1/2 years now and i'm starting to scratch on the advance side of my guitar skills (at least i think). but the practicing method i've been using kinda doesn't work to get better anymore ( i used to play songs till i got good at them then try to play another harder song).

so i wanna change the way i practice.
looking into learning how to sweep pick / shread etc.

what do you guys do when you practice to improve on a technique and stuff?
Quote by musical donkey
cyclobs you are demented..... in a good way
#2
practice that technique.
to learn how to sweep pick = sweep pick lots.
when learning to shred generally = chromatic exercises, economy picking exercises, legato, etc.
you can find that in this section's exercises thread
#3
oh man, lots of pressure, no one has comented yet...well, while i have less experiance than you... i would say you need to concentrate on the skill you would like to aquire, and practace related materials, and that's about as vauge as i can be without sounding stupid.
#4
Personally, I would hold off on sweep picking for a while. You need a solid alternate picking foundation before you want to go anywhere shred wise. Create some single note per string, 2nps, 3nps, and 4nps excercises, don't get locked into doing only chromatics. Chromatics are good IMO for hand syncronization, but don't particualarly have many uses musically. And making good music is your ultimate goal, right? And, probably the most important thing I can stress, practice your OUTSIDE PICKING! It's very important that you become just as fluid on the outside of the strings as you are on the inside of them!
"It is always advisable to be a loser if you cannot become a winner." - Frank Zappa

The name's Garrett.

Gear and stuff:
Taylor 310
American Strat w/ Texas Specials
Ibanez JS1000
Vox Wah (true bypass & LED mod)
Dr. Z Maz 18 JR NR
#5
Quote by Iron_Dude
Personally, I would hold off on sweep picking for a while. You need a solid alternate picking foundation before you want to go anywhere shred wise. Create some single note per string, 2nps, 3nps, and 4nps excercises, don't get locked into doing only chromatics. Chromatics are good IMO for hand syncronization, but don't particualarly have many uses musically. And making good music is your ultimate goal, right? And, probably the most important thing I can stress, practice your OUTSIDE PICKING! It's very important that you become just as fluid on the outside of the strings as you are on the inside of them!


but why do you need to practice outside picking? i personally never pick that way so why should i practice it?
#6
That's because you're an economy picker. Outside picking is considered taboo to you all, isn't it?

The vast majority of guitarists are alternate pickers, so excuse me for assuming the TS is one as well. IF HE IS, then he should not neglect outside picking as so many guitarists do. You need to challenge yourself to become better, and the only way you can do that is by trying something you aren't used to.
"It is always advisable to be a loser if you cannot become a winner." - Frank Zappa

The name's Garrett.

Gear and stuff:
Taylor 310
American Strat w/ Texas Specials
Ibanez JS1000
Vox Wah (true bypass & LED mod)
Dr. Z Maz 18 JR NR
#7
Quote by Iron_Dude
Personally, I would hold off on sweep picking for a while. You need a solid alternate picking foundation before you want to go anywhere shred wise. Create some single note per string, 2nps, 3nps, and 4nps excercises, don't get locked into doing only chromatics. Chromatics are good IMO for hand syncronization, but don't particualarly have many uses musically. And making good music is your ultimate goal, right? And, probably the most important thing I can stress, practice your OUTSIDE PICKING! It's very important that you become just as fluid on the outside of the strings as you are on the inside of them!


that do you mean outside picking?

i'm pretty confident with my altern picking
Quote by musical donkey
cyclobs you are demented..... in a good way
#8
When practicing a technique, focus on that technique and permute the hell out
of it.

For example, if I want to practice finger rolls, I do ascending and descending
diatonic 4ths in every single position using all fingers (this also happens to be
good practice for inside and outside picking. Often, techniques can be combined).

I'd recommend using scales for technique practice. That way you're actually doing
something musical too and it works your ear. There's almost always a musical idea
you can find in scales that will work a specific technique really well.

Use a metronome. Use it for precision and use it to vary your note subdivisions
when practicing any given technique. Don't use it as a stopwatch that you feel
like you have to try and "beat the best time".

Be patient and aware of what you're practicing. It's much more important you feel
like you have control over the note dynamics than playing them fast. Technique
can be the most boring practice without the right mindset, but with the right mindset
you can do whatever you want -- eventually.
#9
Quote by edg
When practicing a technique, focus on that technique and permute the hell out
of it.

For example, if I want to practice finger rolls, I do ascending and descending
diatonic 4ths in every single position using all fingers (this also happens to be
good practice for inside and outside picking. Often, techniques can be combined).

I'd recommend using scales for technique practice. That way you're actually doing
something musical too and it works your ear. There's almost always a musical idea
you can find in scales that will work a specific technique really well.

Use a metronome. Use it for precision and use it to vary your note subdivisions
when practicing any given technique. Don't use it as a stopwatch that you feel
like you have to try and "beat the best time".

Be patient and aware of what you're practicing. It's much more important you feel
like you have control over the note dynamics than playing them fast. Technique
can be the most boring practice without the right mindset, but with the right mindset
you can do whatever you want -- eventually.


lately i've just been going though scales going up and down the neck with all the scales i know. but one big thing with that is i don't practice a metronome but i tend to try to keep to one speed.

thanks for your advice
Quote by musical donkey
cyclobs you are demented..... in a good way
#10
you can tap your foot. does the same thing as a metronome plus trains your mind to be able to stay in rhythm while doing something else.
#11
I think no matter what kind of "picker" you are, it'd be in your best interest to become proficient with both inside and outside picking. It'll only help. I've never seen a great guitarist who wasn't able to do one or the other.
Last edited by fixationdarknes at Jul 13, 2008,
#12
Quote by fixationdarknes
I think no matter what kind of "picker" you are, it'd be in your best interest to become proficient with both inside and outside picking. It'll only help. I've never seen a great guitarist who wasn't able to do one or the other.


but explain why. i see no reason to use it at all. there's no specific technique, other than wasting time technique, i'd use that on.
#13
Using straight alternate picking (combining inside and outside picking) gives you a much more percussive sound while picking and is more pleasing rhythmically. I also find that it's easier to control pick dynamics which in turn gives me a wider range of phrasing options.
"It is always advisable to be a loser if you cannot become a winner." - Frank Zappa

The name's Garrett.

Gear and stuff:
Taylor 310
American Strat w/ Texas Specials
Ibanez JS1000
Vox Wah (true bypass & LED mod)
Dr. Z Maz 18 JR NR