#1
so can anybody explain to me the differences, advantages and disadvantages of different tremolo systems?

Thanks
Daniel
#2
I don't know much, but I'll tell you what I do.

Non-locking tremolos, you can't really do much with them without killing your tuning, so if you're looking to do anything really interesting with a tremolo don't go for them.

Floyd Roses have a big thumbs up from me; played on a couple of guitars with them and they sound great, and stay in tune as well. However, I've heard that they're horrid to set up.

No idea about other locking tremolos; never used one.
#3
I can't go with anything but a Floyd Rose after years of using nothing else. Stays in tune even with extensive tremolo use and it allows you to really set your bridge just the way you want it. It might be technically advanced, but learning how to set them up isn't all that hard. If you spend an hour or two reading and testing the first time around, I can almost guarantee that you will have no future problems making adjustments, tuning or restringing.
#4
As long as you not doing dive bombs and those kind of crazy stuffs non-locking tremolo would work fine...
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#5
Strat tremolo's are non locking, they are great for a bit of vibrato, but aren't that stable tuning wise after a while of whammying
Floyd Roses's are locking, they use locking nuts at the headstock to secure the strings, all of teh crazy dive bomb noises and such come from these. But like everything, cheap ones are bad (licensed floyds, so look our for originl floyd roses.). The main disadvantage is the locking/floating, you cannot change tunings much at all or it will unbalance the tremolo.
Last edited by joeymaxx at Jul 13, 2008,
#6
Well you defiantly don't have the same range of a floyd style vs a vintage style/strat style. Most of the strat style are set divebomb only and sit on the body. Strat style don't lock so you need to get locking tuners and a roller nut helps with them. All my guitars have floyd style now. I am still trying to get a hardtail just to play with different tunings. The only ones I use are OFR/Original Edge. I think both of them quality wise are the same.
#7
strat-style trems are good for vintage vibrato, but don't stay in tune all that well (nor are designed for) extreme whammy abuse.

floyds are great for extreme whammy, but aren't as good for subtle vibrato (and some people don't like the tone of them as much either).

wikinsons (and similar), combined with locking tuners, are kind of in-between.

it really depends what you're after.
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#8
floyds are great...................but how many threads here are "i need help floyd rose problem" or "locking trem will not stay in tune" a double locker is not always the beat all end all. for certain not for a newer guitar player. and they can be a PITA. but when done right they are the best thing since sliced bread.
#9
Quote by Dave_Mc
strat-style trems are good for vintage vibrato, but don't stay in tune all that well (nor are designed for) extreme whammy abuse.

floyds are great for extreme whammy, but aren't as good for subtle vibrato (and some people don't like the tone of them as much either).

wikinsons (and similar), combined with locking tuners, are kind of in-between.

it really depends what you're after.



+1 to this, this is what i would have put, except if you are to add some locking tuners on a strat it stays in tune fine
Manchester United
#10
steinberger trems (R trem, S trem, and trans-trem) stay in tune for a long time, have decent range, and can be restringed and retuned in a couple minutes, but they cost around 200-1000 dollars and are pretty much limited to steinberger-like guitars and project guitars.

Kahler bridges are pretty good too, but expensive.
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#11
Quote by Shabalaba
+1 to this, this is what i would have put, except if you are to add some locking tuners on a strat it stays in tune fine

if you properly string a strat it in tune very well.
#12
if you get a tremolo you probably want a floyd rose. make sure it is original too
originals are made from hardened steel to tighter tolerances which results in better sound and more sustain.

If you dont have a very high quality guitar its not the biggest deal in the world because you have more important problems (like wood type), but in my opinion and experience floyd rose tromelos are the best, an if you have a non recessed i suggest you get a tremsetter so when your tromelo has no tension from the strings on it, it wont smash into your guitars finish.
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