Poll: are string dampers cheating
Poll Options
View poll results: are string dampers cheating
yes
11 34%
no
21 66%
Voters: 32.
#1
are they necessary or cheating? (for when you want to cut lose an shred)
my gear:
Jackson Roads Pro
Gibson Explorer Pro
Fender American P-bass
Squire P-bass
Fender rumble 300 bass amp
Peavey 6505 head
Marshall special edition red cab
#3
Quote by black-serenade-
what the hells a string damper?


Look at MAB... He made one I think

And I think why not? It's just gonna get in the way when you want to play lower frets, so you'd have to learn to switch it quickly and effectively so there aren't just random spots in your playing when you have to stop to move the dampener.
#4
Quote by keabler
are they necessary or cheating? (for when you want to cut lose an shred)


A string damper does wonders in the studio, but i bet you'd get a lot of static about using one live. it works best if they cant see you use one. Michael Angelo Batio uses them often, as with many other shred guitarists in the studio.

Quote by black-serenade-
what the hells a string damper?


A string damper is a device that mutes the strings near the nut so you can play shred licks, etc. without having to worry about adjacent open strings bleeding thru your sound if you accidently touch them while shredding.
#5
Well, you could say the same thing about distortion.

Playing clean reveals a lot more of your mistakes. Plus, with more gain, your amp responds more easily, so you don't have to HAMMER ON, but merely touching the note will sound it.
#6
ohhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh
hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh
hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh

i see

cant u just use like wrist bands?
#8
actually when i play clean it sounds better. because then every little movement doesnt get amplified, so when i pull off a string (not doing a pull off but just switching notes) it doesnt ring out, especially for arpeggios (sweeps) all my sweeps sound way better when im on clean

i guess my main question is, if your are really shredding h-core are string dampers necessary or should your technique fix it all, because even if i try to do it with the best technique i still get that extra noise.

i usually use a headband if i am just practicing playing fast.
my gear:
Jackson Roads Pro
Gibson Explorer Pro
Fender American P-bass
Squire P-bass
Fender rumble 300 bass amp
Peavey 6505 head
Marshall special edition red cab
#9
Quote by sashki
Well, you could say the same thing about distortion.

Playing clean reveals a lot more of your mistakes. Plus, with more gain, your amp responds more easily, so you don't have to HAMMER ON, but merely touching the note will sound it.


thats kind of the problem its to easy to get extra noise

i suppose i could play with less distortion ...
my gear:
Jackson Roads Pro
Gibson Explorer Pro
Fender American P-bass
Squire P-bass
Fender rumble 300 bass amp
Peavey 6505 head
Marshall special edition red cab
#10
Quote by black-serenade-
cant u just use like wrist bands?


Ive seen people use SOCKS. wrap em around, tie em, go shreddin. But, ive tried the wristband method, it doesnt work as good as you'd think.

Joe Satriani and many others have been known to use their picking hands to mute the strings by just grabbing the neck, holding the palm over the strings, and hammering individual notes really fast. I dont know what to call the technique though.
#11
Why does it matter. It's not like the note will sound better because it was more difficult to produce. The thought of it being cheating is absurd...
#13
When you're practicing it is cheating. When you are recording, for quality purposes it is a great tool.
Let's go back to five billion bpm and see how good i am.
#15
I've never used any thing to do this, but I'm not opposed to the idea of it. And since guitar playing isn't a sport (despite what some people seem to think) I don't see how you can "cheat" since you don't win anything. The idea is to make music, so who cares HOW you make it as long as it sounds good.
#16
Quote by black-serenade-
so wat if u need to play an open note then?


u cant
you take it off
my gear:
Jackson Roads Pro
Gibson Explorer Pro
Fender American P-bass
Squire P-bass
Fender rumble 300 bass amp
Peavey 6505 head
Marshall special edition red cab
#17
Quote by Fatty Sizzler
Why does it matter. It's not like the note will sound better because it was more difficult to produce. The thought of it being cheating is absurd...


well if your a technique ***** like me ... you can play way sloppier with a string damper
my gear:
Jackson Roads Pro
Gibson Explorer Pro
Fender American P-bass
Squire P-bass
Fender rumble 300 bass amp
Peavey 6505 head
Marshall special edition red cab
#18
Quote by black-serenade-
so wat if u need to play an open note then?


When using a separate Damper device, you'll have to disengage it, which may take up more time than you have.
#19
i seeeeeeeeeeeeee, well.. interesting, i cant find and on musicians friend, but maybe ill experiment with a wrist band or socks :P
#20
Quote by Attack
When you're practicing it is cheating. When you are recording, for quality purposes it is a great tool.

+1

practice good technique so you dont have to cheat
Jackson DK2M Dinky Pro W/ EMG 81/85 18v Black
ESP LTD EC-1000 W/ EMG 81/60 See Thru Blue
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Peavey 6505 W/ 2x12 V30
#21
Quote by ash_attack
practice good technique so you dont have to cheat


+1

Well, theres that too, i suppose...
#22
In answer to someone above's question, yes, your technique should allow you not to have to play with one, and I haven't ever, but I can see how it would make recording in the studio more economical if you were playing something really tricky, because you wouldn't have to do as many takes. Still though, if you played it first with a dampener, and then tried to play it live....who knows....
Why did Pat Metheney cross the road? He didn't, his hair got in the way
--
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#23
you can get string dampers at www.allparts.com
my gear:
Jackson Roads Pro
Gibson Explorer Pro
Fender American P-bass
Squire P-bass
Fender rumble 300 bass amp
Peavey 6505 head
Marshall special edition red cab
#24
Quote by J.MitMetallica
In answer to someone above's question, yes, your technique should allow you not to have to play with one, and I haven't ever, but I can see how it would make recording in the studio more economical if you were playing something really tricky, because you wouldn't have to do as many takes. Still though, if you played it first with a dampener, and then tried to play it live....who knows....


can you really cut lose and play as fast as say tapping (say on sweeps) and still have it clean or do you have to mute with your picking hand.
my gear:
Jackson Roads Pro
Gibson Explorer Pro
Fender American P-bass
Squire P-bass
Fender rumble 300 bass amp
Peavey 6505 head
Marshall special edition red cab
#25
Quote by keabler
can you really cut lose and play as fast as say tapping (say on sweeps) and still have it clean or do you have to mute with your picking hand.


Well you have to 'cut loose' whilst muting the strings with your picking hand, or just not hitting the other strings....it's just practice. Doesn't make perfect, but makes better
Why did Pat Metheney cross the road? He didn't, his hair got in the way
--
Member #1 of Ibanez > You club. PM me to join
#27
A dampener really just seems like a safety net for the good guitarist in the studio. Live, doesnt seem too practical
#28
I can understand it from a recording point of view...I guess.
But part of "playing" you guitar, is learning to mute the unused strings...EVEN when letting loose. Maybe that's a bit old school thinking, seeing the poll results...but if you "need" a string dampener while wanking....I'd spend a bit more time figuring out the holes in your tech and less time hiding them with gadgets.

If you've got so much slop in your shredding, that you can't get by with a simple noise gate (Yes...noise gates are for amp buzz etc...but they also help to eliminate extraneous slop notes/noises as well), then you should be looking at your flaws a bit more closely, IMO.



Don
#29
MAB only uses it for his twin neck guitar where he's solely playing with one hand on each neck.

I wouldn't use one for a normal guitar though. if you're picking you should be clean enough to not have too much noise, if you're doing legato then you can mute with your picking hand if needed.

waste of money IMO.
Rhythm in Jump. Dancing Close to You.

Quote by element4433
Yeah. people, like Lemoninfluence, are hypocrites and should have all their opinions invalidated from here on out.