#1
Noob here, but listen anyways.

Just started playing guitar, haven't even mastered one tab, found this guitar somewhere in the house.

My question/statement is this:
Does it matter how much the guitar cost? Quality?

I mean, to me, doesn't it all come down to how well you can make the use of how poor or how good a guitar is?

My guitar cost 40 bucks... Probably not something some idol would use but it sounds pretty good... (Then again, what do I know?)

So, the question it all comes down to:
Does it matter? Cost, quality, ect.?

Your opinion counts.

Forgive if this somehow needs to be moved.
#2
Well yeah.

But not for someone who cant play a note yet.

When you get into it properly, you should buy a decent one.
#3
it all depends
get a 300 dollar guitar, like a ibanez rg or something
or a epiphone les paul
and a decent amp for a hundred or so, like a line 16 spider 3 15W

put u at about 400 bucks

its a nice setup for a beginner, but if you cant play one note, no it does not matter.
youll know when you outgrow your equipment, you will find yourself wanting to do things but the guitar is holding you back a bit.
youll see it , trust me.
2 or 3 months imo.
#4
Play what you have for the moment.

When you are comfortable with playing guitar you will probably realise what your preferences are in terms of style, tone, comfort etc, and can then think about what youd really want.
Its not an absolute rule, but more expensive guitars if they are the right ones will sound and play better
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#5
I personally loved my old guitar. Working with not-so-good equipment can either really help your playing (if you're fast on a slow neck guitar/it sounds good with $10 pickups you KNOW on a good guitar it's gonna sound twice as good) or can quite hinder your motivation, because it doesn't sound amazing.
#6
Thanks everyone for your opinions and advice, they will be used!

However, I'm stupid. Forgiveness is being asked in advance. I now realize my retarded mistake.

Ready for the bomb shell of my retardedness?

My guitar is an acoustic one (or classical, whatever).

I REALLY should've said that in the beggining...
#7
yeah, just throw down like 400 dollars for (electric guitar) equipment--piginacanoe knows what he's talking about, but you're gonna hate it after awhile if you get an epiphone. go for an ibanez rg, and don't spend less than 250 on a guitar. make sure you consult the almighty UGers before buying though.
#8
Quote by Reemee
Thanks everyone for your opinions and advice, they will be used!

However, I'm stupid. Forgiveness is being asked in advance. I now realize my retarded mistake.

Ready for the bomb shell of my retardedness?

My guitar is an acoustic one (or classical, whatever).

I REALLY should've said that in the beggining...


I think we all knew that. If you would have an electric in the house you would known that already i think.
#9
Quote by XSider
I think we all knew that. If you would have an electric in the house you would known that already i think.


Touche!
#10
Well, both Hendrix AND me learned the guitar that way, so yeah, of course it'll do, especially 'cause a LOT of people quit the instrument after a few months or even weeks so there's no point in investing a lot of money when you're not even sure whether you're gonna like this.

However, as you progress you will eventually feel the need of getting a nicer setup. It'll make the experience and learning process all the more enjoyable. Until that time here's some suggestions for your current "gear":

-Get yourself a guitar tuner. Playing guitar is always nicer when the whole thing is in tune (I usually tune my guitars by ear 'cause I'm too lazy to look up my tuner though). Also, I'd say get a pack of spare strings because the ones that you're currently using are going to snap eventually. This usually happens when you're about to master some kickass song and it's gonna suck so always be prepared

-Look up the Smoke On The Water tab or something

-Adjust the action (aka the string height) if you're not comfortable with it. If the strings are placed too far away from the fretboard you'll need to apply a lot of pressure with your left hand in order to play a note, which isn't necessarily a bad thing because that hand will get a lot stronger. The downside: you won't be able to play fast stuff, which is why many people prefer their strings to be close to the fretboard. If they're located too close however you might get nasty buzzing sounds and as I mentioned you won't gain any strength which'll come in "handy" (lol) if you're trying to learn some chords.

Also, on some cheap acoustic guitars the distance between the strings and the fretboard differs a lot between each string. If your guitar has nylon strings you'll want each string to be at the same height above the fretboard, if not you'll typically notice that the outer strings are place a liiiiiiiiiiitle bit lower in comparison to the ones in the middle because the fretboard on these guitars is slightly curved. Oh, and by the way, in order to actually adjust string height you'll have to file down the string cavities on the "saddle" down by the bridge.

http://www.fretnotguitarrepair.com/images/MartinBridge.JPG

Just keep in mind that A) if you file 'em down too much you're gonna get the buzzing sound as mentioned, B) don't touch the "nut" (the other "string holder" which is located on the other side by the headstock) and C) I'm only suggesting this because my first guitar had horrible action and at one point it got so frustrating I nearly gave up playing. But that wasn't a $40 guitar, in fact I got it for $20 from a "friend" so I don't see why you should encounter the same problem. Don't mess with your instrument if it's not necessary

/] 三方 [\
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#11
I started on a horrible horrible acoustic. I nailed the back of the body to the rest of the body then used carpenters glue once I learned that was a no-no. Nailed down frets to avoid fret buzz. That was a bad idea. Don't try it. My fingers are strong as hell now, but still have bad positioning so i get cramps and such. As long as it can stay in tune reasonably and makes noise that sounds like a guitar your off to a good start.

This what I started on, and like half of the people on this forum. Not too bad.
http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/Squier-Stop-Dreaming-Start-Playing-Affinity-Strat-HSS-Pack-With-Fender-Frontman-15G-Amp?sku=513288

This is what I should of got if I got a pack.
http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/Epiphone-Les-Paul-Standard-and-Amp-Pack?sku=513157

going used is the best idea. good luck
#12
I played classical guitar when about two years ago. I did that for a year, but I didn't learn much... but I played enough to build calluses and learn some scales and what notes are where. That's when I decided to buy an acoustic guitar. I was serious then, so I decided to buy a $700 guitar, because for me, I wanted something reliable, something with great quality that's gonna stick with me till the day I day (or at least for a very long time). I've been playing my acoustic for almost a full year now and I've progressed a lot more than I did with just the classical guitar.

If you want something that you know you are going to pick up every day, that you want to have as something to remind you of your beginning days. If you want something that's gonna make you progress better as a guitarist, then quality goes first. Buy a guitar at the top of your budget. Try to never go any bit lower. Buy the best quality so you'll know you'll be playing, and wanting to play, every day.
I will soon perish from this lethal injection called love.