#1
Today I went to the library to get some songbooks, and I came across the Nevermind songbook. It states that in the intro, you should play an Fsus4 (1-3-3-3-x-x). I always played a regular F5 power chord, I've heard the song like a thousand times, and I think it sounds more correct. However, I've got that information from the internet, and this seems to be done by "professionals".
Also, it states that Polly is played like: Em (0-2-2-0-x-x) and then mute E A D and then hit A E D open. Again, to me muting E A D twice sounds better than muting once and then hitting open strings.
When I saw how they tabbed some Green Day and Blink-182 stuff, I didn't trust them really... but that's something for a different thread.

Anyone care to comment on these "official" songbooks, whether they are more correct that internet tabs, and maybe go into how Curt played these songs? I've never seen a good video in which I can see what he's really playing.

Thanks in advance.
#2
i think its how that person or whatever has interpretted it.

Also, the book is based on the album versions, that have been mastered and layered and stuff, so i'd try learning the book way, then see if it sounds right. if not, go on that all nirvana songs tab on here. it literally has everything!

hope i helped
#3
well songbooks dont show you the exact same way as the artist played the song, it's just some musicians that tab the song out.
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#4
first off, "Curt" is spelt with a "K"
second, song books are just the same as internet tabs, people listening to songs and working them out
third, i've never looked at the nevermind book, but my small collection of books are more correct than most tabs
fourth, learn to use your ears
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#5
Quote by M.B.MetalTabber
first off, "Curt" is spelt with a "K"


Oops.. stupid typo by a Kurt fan

I forgot to mention that I was talking about the intro to "Smells Like Teen Spirit". I knew how to play the song long before I looked into the book. I knew the song by heart and always thought it was an F5 power chord. Well, it doesn't really matter.. I was just surprised... that's all.
Some other songbooks were definately wrong on some other riffs of other bands, which is why I was disappointed by those official books, though they are kinda useful sometimes.
#6
As far as I'm concerned the ear is the most important tool in making music; go with what you think sounds right and who cares if it's exactly the same as the original.
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#7
Songbooks are a waste of time, almost all songs are tabbed online or can be done with ear
#8
Quote by Boddah1
Songbooks are a waste of time, almost all songs are tabbed online or can be done with ear

Half true, however the accuracy of online tabs varies wildly and it takes a long time to develop your ears.
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#9
Yes, it's a popular misconception that "official" songbooks are somehow authorized (or done by) the band. They're just musicians hired by the publishing companies to transcribe, and they do it the same way you and I do it (listening over and over). The difference is that generally they're better then typical amateur tabs posted on internet. I say "generally" because I've seen some published songbooks that were excellent but also some that were pretty bad, it all depends on the musician who's doing the transcribing, how much experience they have and whether they have an ear for the style of music they're transcribing.

I was a little bit involved with it back in the 80's, I knew a guy who did some of the official songbooks (for example G & Roses) and man, these guys got paid peanuts for a lot of work and not much glory (many times songbooks won't even list the transcriber in credits). Contract work too, so it's not like you're employed by the publishing company or anything.

But generally songbooks are of better quality then amateur tabs. For example, if you listen closely to Smells Like Teen Spirit you can hear those sus chords in the intro. It's just Kurt being sloppy (ok that sounds bad, replace "sloppy" with "loose", ha). But the point is I'm sure he didn't think "I'm going to play some sus chords here", instead its just the way he was fingering those chords: notice how the sus chord fingering for the sixth-str root chords (i.e. ring finger barred) is same as fingering for fifth-string root chords, just moved over to adjacent strings. He's just fooling around with shapes and he came up with that riff, would be my guess.
#10
Use your ears. If it sounds right to you the way you play it then **** the books.

It's like drawing a picture of Garfield. Are you going to draw it exactly as Jim Davis did? No. But if it looks awesome to you when you're finished then that's all that matters. No book out there is going to tell you to "draw it exactly like this or it will SUCK."

Same holds true with music. Play what sounds to be right to you. When I'm playing a cover on stage it's rarely ever exactly like the recording, but it still sounds awesome and the crowd gets pumped up regardless.
#11
My Nevermind book seems on the dot. In fact, it was personally recommended by Kurt's ghost... (I know, my jokes suck) But seriously, do you have the "Guitar Recorded Version"? It seem s very accurate, especially on Polly...
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#12
Quote by guitarviz
Yes, it's a popular misconception that "official" songbooks are somehow authorized (or done by) the band. They're just musicians hired by the publishing companies to transcribe, and they do it the same way you and I do it (listening over and over). The difference is that generally they're better then typical amateur tabs posted on internet. I say "generally" because I've seen some published songbooks that were excellent but also some that were pretty bad, it all depends on the musician who's doing the transcribing, how much experience they have and whether they have an ear for the style of music they're transcribing.

I was a little bit involved with it back in the 80's, I knew a guy who did some of the official songbooks (for example G & Roses) and man, these guys got paid peanuts for a lot of work and not much glory (many times songbooks won't even list the transcriber in credits). Contract work too, so it's not like you're employed by the publishing company or anything.

But generally songbooks are of better quality then amateur tabs. For example, if you listen closely to Smells Like Teen Spirit you can hear those sus chords in the intro. It's just Kurt being sloppy (ok that sounds bad, replace "sloppy" with "loose", ha). But the point is I'm sure he didn't think "I'm going to play some sus chords here", instead its just the way he was fingering those chords: notice how the sus chord fingering for the sixth-str root chords (i.e. ring finger barred) is same as fingering for fifth-string root chords, just moved over to adjacent strings. He's just fooling around with shapes and he came up with that riff, would be my guess.

Every now and again I mention that SMTS isn't a powerchord riff and nobody ever believes me

Is it any wonder that there's so many sh1tty versions of it being played if people can't even be bothered to listen to it properly to hear for themselves how it was played?

Like you said, they're probably not intentional sus4's as such, just a quirky byproduct of the way it was played when recorded.
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#13
Quote by steven seagull
Every now and again I mention that SMTS isn't a powerchord riff and nobody ever believes me

Is it any wonder that there's so many sh1tty versions of it being played if people can't even be bothered to listen to it properly to hear for themselves how it was played?

Like you said, they're probably not intentional sus4's as such, just a quirky byproduct of the way it was played when recorded.


Exactly. I remember reading this thread some time ago. You said that SLTS had full barre chords, and therefore canot be qualified as a beginner song. Even though I disagree that it isn´t a beginner song, surely you can´t play the whole song a day after you picked up a guitar, but still if you can handle string bending, barre chords, the strumming pattern, it´s easy.

Anyways, I didn´t believe you at first, because I always played it with power chords only, until I saw this book. To be honest, it doesn´t really matter whether you use the Fsus4 or an F5, I don´t really hear the difference. I also think that Kurt plays it live differently, with power chords only, but again I´m not sure.

Quote by Grunge_Sucks
My Nevermind book seems on the dot. In fact, it was personally recommended by Kurt's ghost... (I know, my jokes suck) But seriously, do you have the "Guitar Recorded Version"? It seem s very accurate, especially on Polly...


Yes, I've got that book. Well, Polly seems kinda off, generally it's correct, but I think those open string chords are wrong. They're just mutes... I think.

Those "Guitar Recorded Version" are sometimes really wrong. There are books that do state that they tabbed everything "just like it was played on the record" (i.e. Slayer - Just the riffs).