#1
I have been playing guitar for about 3 months and I have learned many riffs, intros, and a few solos. So my question is should I now be learning entire songs? It's just that sometimes when I learn solos and riffs it seems so much more fun. It would be kinda cool a whole song though. How do you learn? Mainly riffs, solos, etc. or actual songs? By the way playing while standing is pretty damn hard!
#3
Really it's not essential, if you really love a song then sure, learn it for fun, but really it doesn't matter that much. As long as your picking out parts that will improve your technique and give you new ideas. However learning particualrly long or strenuous songs is excellent for stamina, so go nuts
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#5
I have been playing now for nine months, and a while ago I had similar thoughts. I had learned a bunch of intros and riffs...lots of chord progressions but never an entire song front to back. I mean realistically I could have learned an entire song, but I didn't see it as something that I should do. I was not going to be playing shows...nor did I plan on recording etc...things that required knowing an entire song.

If you do want to learn an entire song, my natural progression was for me to go back to a song that I had learned the intro and solo for, then just fill in the rest. Nothing to hard, just something that I could do so I could get that sense of accomplishment.

Just do what you think is fun and then have more fun with it.

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#6
I usually learn the riffs, intros, and outros... but I usually make up the solos and fill myself.

Sometimes, I challenge myself with very hard music, and I learn what I can while I'm interested (i.e. Robert Johnson's Crossroad's, Bach's Toccata and Fugue, Steve Vai's interpretation of Paganini's 5th Caprice)

As for standing while playing... I must be a natural . Wait until you trying singing and playing at the same time.
#8
i try to learn the whole song, but i usually only end up remembering my favourite riffs n solos.
currently im trying to learn three dimensional defect [decapitated] tis hard for me but its got some riffs that help me with timing and accuracy so im gonna stick with it.
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#9
Quote by :.RaZoRbAcK.:
Really it's not essential, if you really love a song then sure, learn it for fun, but really it doesn't matter that much. As long as your picking out parts that will improve your technique and give you new ideas. However learning particualrly long or strenuous songs is excellent for stamina, so go nuts

Really?

Well, if you ever plan on being in a band/being prepared to play with others, I would advise to learn songs (not all, but at least some) all the way through. First, it's rewarding and second, when someone asks you to play something you have a whole song ready to go.
#10
I'm in the same boat - I just can't get myself to learn a whole song.

Edit: I hear something that really interests me, I learn it, then I move on.
#11
It is SO important to learn full songs. I can't stress that enough. I never did for like 2 years and then I joined a band and I wasn't used to learning a song from beginning to end so I had to work my ass off to make things work. The most important thing in learning a song is to be able to play it entirely without stopping, even if you mess up just keep going.
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#12
I'm in the same boat - I just can't get myself to learn a whole song.

Edit: I hear something that really interests me, I learn it, then I move on.

That's exactly what I do. I hear something on iTunes and say "Oh that sounds cool, let's see if I can do that" ...and repeat