#3
Ditto. You won't be encountering ant Bm7(b5) chords in metal. Why do you want to know?
Dorkus.
#4
Learn something in drop D tuning makes it sound heavier look at the tabs. Look up tabs for bands you like.
#7
This one is good.

G-2
B-3
E-1

and then you can move that pattern. Another good one is

G-3
B-2
E-1

I don't know the names for these chords, but they sound kickass!

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#8
Quote by m4l666
This one is good.

G-2
B-3
E-1

and then you can move that pattern. Another good one is

G-3
B-2
E-1

I don't know the names for these chords, but they sound kickass!



??
Dorkus.
#9
Quote by Graveworm
What are some good chords for metal to learn?

A lot of metal is based on powerchords because of the distortion used, but one thing I like to do is include clean passages (similar to Opeth) with interesting chords. Personally, I like altered dominant chords, half-diminished seventh chords, minor ninth chords and suspended chords. I will sometimes use modal passages as well; I like Lydian and Phrygian. my favorite mode is Locrian but I only write with it rarely.
#10
You've got your standard 5ths 1,5,8. Played on the A string you can also play the the note above on the E string which is a lower octave of the 5.

then you're got major and minor thirds - these are usually two note - technically not chords. Think of the opening of Creeping Death by Metallica.

Then there's the 1 sharp 5 and the 1 flat 5

also sus2 chords can sound good to - -like A, E, B

regular major and minor chords can also work in metal

I was playing something heavy sounding today and using 1,3,7 - like G, B,F# or C, E, B - -sounded pretty cool - -very dissonant with distortion but still works for me. Great for a transition to a standard power chord. If you do a G, B, F - - it sounds a bit more blues-ey. These are all on the 3 low strings, btw.
Last edited by GoDrex at Jul 14, 2008,
#11
D# --------
A# --------
F# --------
C# ---0---
G# ---0---
G# ---0---
Last edited by haz_uk at Jul 14, 2008,
#14
Quote by Shortcut
Ditto. You won't be encountering ant Bm7(b5) chords in metal. Why do you want to know?



You obviously havent listened to much metal.

Anyway, chords for metal?

D-3
A-2
E-1
(and variations of that are pretty common)

D-9
A-7
E-5

D-7
A-9
E-5

Mess around with shapes, see what sounds good. Learn songs from bands you like, all that.
Quote by MoogleRancha
It's like Fenriz and J. Read

"I'm so happy to love metal and stuff"

"I AM metal"
#17
Quote by jetfuel495
drop c ftw


nah, half step down with a drop G# ftw :p
#19
Xsus4 (no 5th)
Xminor (no 5th)

I like both of those in place of regular power chords.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#21
Not trying to hijack the thread but to D, everytime I see "there is no such thing as E# and B#,thats very basic music theory" in your sig I let out good chuckle.
#22
The devil chord.. It's a secret though.
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#23
Quote by rockadoodle
Not trying to hijack the thread but to D, everytime I see "there is no such thing as E# and B#,thats very basic music theory" in your sig I let out good chuckle.

Oddly enough, I just got rid of it because it's time for a new quote at some point.
#25
uh oh... they knows em nasty tritones...

anyways for a start learn your E and F power chords... palm mute the crap out of them and chug away. Then tune your guitar so low than your strings turn into the Devil's spaghetti! That's the only way to achieve the metal sound.

(take this post with a grain of salt and a boatload of sarcasm)
#26
i use "all" the chords in metal, i don't see why everyone thinks you can only use 5ths. if you know what you're doing you can use any chord and make it sound good. in fact, if you use say an Em7 and it sounds bad, it's probably because you're using too much distortion.
#27
And if you need to use heavy distortion, use the In Flames technique of breaking up chords between two guitarists.


Guitar 1:
A-5-
E-3-

Guitar 2:
G-3-
D-5-


That yields a Gm chord. I use this technique in "Song 2" in my profile.

The other thing to do is play distorted power chords on one guitar and clean arpeggios on top with another guitar.

A third thing to do is play a power chord and then, on the same guitar, pick the high E and B strings and let them ring. This is most effective in the key of Em, which most metal is in,
#28
Quote by _brandon
diminished? octavia? wholetone? minor? evil demonic metal chords in Z#?


DROP Z TUNING!
#29
Quote by bangoodcharlote
And if you need to use heavy distortion, use the In Flames technique of breaking up chords between two guitarists.


Guitar 1:
A-5-
E-3-

Guitar 2:
G-3-
D-5-
Damn, I thought I was cool. I've been doing the same thing but with closed voicings(root+fifth on one guitar, third+octave on other guitar).

Anyway, this is also just about the only way to get extended chords in without getting ridiculously muddy.

Also, TS, it's not so much about individual chords, but chords in relation to the general tonality. For instance, an Fm chord by itself is well, just Fm. But if you're playing an Am progression and you shove in an Fm(vi) you get a very dark sound.