#1
This has been bothering me, but I need to know how to make it work. My guitar teacher and I were just jamming (double lead), and what can I do to make it sound good and not just two random leads? That's just what stumped me..

Help? Thanks.
Gear:

Guitars:
Takamine Gs330S
Fender Standard Stratocaster
Ibanez RG3EXQM1
Epiphone SG G-310

Amps:
Crate Palomino V16

Pedals
Ibanez TS9DX
Line 6 Tonecore Uber Metal
#2
Play in the same key, of course. A bass player or a backing track could help. The best thing to do would be to both play rhythm, and take turns soloing over one another.
#3
That would definately work, but we were both just playing lead to some rather fast blues rock. Just leads, no backing tracks or bass. I just need to know how I can improve on this. Being in key is one thing.
Gear:

Guitars:
Takamine Gs330S
Fender Standard Stratocaster
Ibanez RG3EXQM1
Epiphone SG G-310

Amps:
Crate Palomino V16

Pedals
Ibanez TS9DX
Line 6 Tonecore Uber Metal
#4
Shouldn't you have asked your guitar teacher while you were jamming?

Anyways, same key is a first. You can try harmonizing with him, see what he's playing and play like a third upwards. Try alternating patterns, like he bends a note and you play a short run upwards, bend a note and he continues the run...etc. Be creative.
Alta Vera - My real life alternative rock band.
Ashen Spire - My personal metal band.

Super Mario, F-Zero & Dragonball Z covers!

PSN: whatev27

Let me ask you, does a machine like yourself ever experience fear?

#5
A third upwards? And yeah we've done double lead before and we were talking about that, harmonizing and octaves..
Gear:

Guitars:
Takamine Gs330S
Fender Standard Stratocaster
Ibanez RG3EXQM1
Epiphone SG G-310

Amps:
Crate Palomino V16

Pedals
Ibanez TS9DX
Line 6 Tonecore Uber Metal
#6
Yea, harmonizing in thirds.

A third is an interval. Basically, you go two notes up on the scale you're playing from any note on the scale, and you've found the third. It's a very common way of harmonizing, and it sounds really good.

For example, if you're playing in C major, the third of a C would be the E. Third of the D would be the F. Third of the E would be the G. Etc.
Alta Vera - My real life alternative rock band.
Ashen Spire - My personal metal band.

Super Mario, F-Zero & Dragonball Z covers!

PSN: whatev27

Let me ask you, does a machine like yourself ever experience fear?

#7
http://ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/soloing/soloing_basics_ii_part_3_-_harmonizing.html

That's a great harmonizing lesson, though it assumes some knowledge of intervals and basic scales.

However, if you want to play two completely different parts, that's considerable harder. I would suggest analyzing songs that use this technique, especially classical music. Your teacher can help you with this.
#8
Quote by sue
However, if you want to play two completely different parts, that's considerable harder. I would suggest analyzing songs that use this technique, especially classical music. Your teacher can help you with this

TS, Sue is talking about counterpoint here so in addition to analysing songs you could learn about some of the 'rules' for counterpoint
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#10
^Used to be into, now I'm into teh br00tlez as much.
Gear:

Guitars:
Takamine Gs330S
Fender Standard Stratocaster
Ibanez RG3EXQM1
Epiphone SG G-310

Amps:
Crate Palomino V16

Pedals
Ibanez TS9DX
Line 6 Tonecore Uber Metal
#11
Who is your guitar teacher,is he/she a proffesional?
Because surely your teacher should know what sort of things to do, and he/she would be able to make it sound better by basing what they are playing around what you are playing.
#13
Yes listen to the allman brothers band
also check out some early black sabbath, tony iommi would often record a guitar solo and put a similar one but changes it up over it
check out war pigs (everyones heard it) and listen to the solo, it goes up to 3 leads over each other at the same time
then of course you can harmonize as its been previously said, mainly stick with 3rds and octaves, but 4ths sound pretty badass along with 6ths, and if you can make it work try some 2nds, allan holdsworth pulled those off
#14
Quote by khalil1220
tony iommi would often record a guitar solo and put a similar one but changes it up over it
check out war pigs (everyones heard it) and listen to the solo, it goes up to 3 leads over each other at the same time
This is the song I was thinking of.

The other song that came to mind was Bach's "Little Fugue."