#4
Well, it's practically impossible to know for sure what tuning someone's using based only on a recording. You can, however, find a tuning that it can be played in effectively. Generally speaking, you can take the lowest note found in the song, and if it's lower than an open E, tune your E down and the rest by the same amount. So if the lowest note is a C, you can tune down to C standard. You can usually use most tunings with C as the lowest note and be able to play the song.
#6
Firstly, please don't make multiple posts just for the sake of keeping the thread alive. Someone will respond, don't worry.

You need to train your ear well first in order to hear what's going on, and then the tuning will be easier to figure out. For some ideas on that, look at a post I made a little while back called "Finding A Balance In Musical Study". It has a few tips on ear training that'll be helpful for you; for starters, play a lot of intervals so you can hear what they sound like and also work on some sight singing. In addition, transcribe music as often as you can.

If I remember, I'll link the post here in a bit.
Quote by Metallica_Man55
or you could just look up the tab to find out the tuning.

Don't take the shortcut all the time; aural training will prove to be invaluable to your musicianship.
#7
I usually listen for the lowest note that is played. I've been playing for awhile now so my ear is pretty developed that I can hear whether or not a song is in a dropped tuning or just lower in general and thats something that'll eventually come to you too. Practice makes perfect
#8
Quote by burrrandon
someone said find the lowest note, but not sure if thats true.

How else would you do it? It's simple logic, no?

If the lowest note is a D, then you could tune to drop D, or D standard... use whatever tuning you think makes the song easiest to play. It's no magic.

And I have a feeling you don't know music theory. Go learn it.

Quote by :-D
Firstly, please don't make multiple posts just for the sake of keeping the thread alive. Someone will respond, don't worry.

You need to train your ear well first in order to hear what's going on, and then the tuning will be easier to figure out. For some ideas on that, look at a post I made a little while back called "Finding A Balance In Musical Study". It has a few tips on ear training that'll be helpful for you; for starters, play a lot of intervals so you can hear what they sound like and also work on some sight singing. In addition, transcribe music as often as you can.

If I remember, I'll link the post here in a bit.
I haven't read the post this guy is talking about, but it sounds like he's got the right idea. Listen to this man.
#9
^The only problem is that the song may not utilize the entire range of the tuning. You could still be in Drop C, for example, even though the lowest chord you've played is a D5.
Quote by iimjpii
I haven't read the post this guy is talking about, but it sounds like he's got the right idea. Listen to this man.

Best advice in this thread.
#10
Work out (or look up a tab) a riff in the song, then youtube a video to see where the person plays it, then work out the notes that this position would be in standard and tune your guitar down/up till the frets they are playing correspond with the notes you are hearing.

You may have to do a few riffs to get all the strings, however, the tuning of the guitar won't affect it that much, as long as you can play it. Different tunings might make the song a bit easier, or make the tone (very slightly) different, but the most important thing is that the song you're playing sounds accurate, not that you are playing it exactly where the song writer plays it.
#11
i think over time you will just hear the difference in tunings. i know i can tell if something is in drop D or an open tuning or a lower standard tuning like C standard. because if you play in those tunings, then you know the kind of sound they have and the kind of things people usually play with them. finding the lowest note is a good way to figure out whether or not another tuning is used. but sometimes that doesnt always work.
#12
Quote by :-D
^The only problem is that the song may not utilize the entire range of the tuning. You could still be in Drop C, for example, even though the lowest chord you've played is a D5.

Best advice in this thread.



That is true, but why tune that low? Seems a bit daft.
#13
A lot of the time, just figuring out what a guitarist normally does is enough. Quite a lot of them use the same tuning for everything.

Lowest note isn't necessarily useful for looking at people that don't play at the bottom of the range. The lowest note in "Hit Me With Your Best Shot" is probably G, it is still in standard.

Depending on the artist, replicating their tuning isn't always necessary. Drop tuning in particular, a lot of people use it even though Slack tuning would be exactly the same for what they are doing, then on the other hand there are things that would be impossible to play in Slack tuning that absolutely need Drop tuning.
#14
Quote by Matheau
A lot of the time, just figuring out what a guitarist normally does is enough. Quite a lot of them use the same tuning for everything.

Lowest note isn't necessarily useful for looking at people that don't play at the bottom of the range. The lowest note in "Hit Me With Your Best Shot" is probably G, it is still in standard.

Depending on the artist, replicating their tuning isn't always necessary. Drop tuning in particular, a lot of people use it even though Slack tuning would be exactly the same for what they are doing, then on the other hand there are things that would be impossible to play in Slack tuning that absolutely need Drop tuning.


what's slack tuning?
#16
Quote by :-D
^It's Eb standard tuning, everything a half step down. Just another name for it.


oh ok. at first i thought it meant that you would slack on tuning it and always play in standard.

i am guilty of that with half step down songs a lot.
#17
Quote by Metallica_Man55
oh ok. at first i thought it meant that you would slack on tuning it and always play in standard.



Nice interpretation. I always use the term "slack tuning" because it makes me sound more knowledgeable than I am.