#1
Just a quick question: If I wanted to solo over a G Major chord sequence (key), what scales could I use? I am guessing the G major/major Pentatonic scale and possibly one other one?


Also, I realize about "playing outside the boxes" and playing what sounds good, however I am asking this question to help put things in perspective and to lay a solid foundation. I'd appreciate any help. Thanks!
#3
Depends what kind of music you're playing.

General major stuff - G major
More bluesy/rocky - G major pentatonic, G Mixolydian
Spacey, interesting - G Lydian
Slightly harder rock - G minor pentatonic

And then of course it's all about what you do with them.
#4
If it was a strictly G major chord sequence then the best scales to use would be either G Major or G major pentatonic but depending on the exact nature of the chords you might be able to get away with G lydian or G mixolydian.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#6
Quote by CousticStrangla
Awesome, so ultimately regardless of the exact 'type' of scale I use, the solo should be in the key of G?


Yes, basically, unless you want to go all jazzy on it.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#7
You can use anything you like really, depending on what scale you like and how you want it to sound. I play mostly in Aeolian or Dorian, but love Mixolydian and phrygian. But all the others are great too. Of course these are just the major scales. Try recording in a key, G or A for instance and try playing different modes of the major scale over the top and listen to what you like. As you get to know the major scale and its modes better and how they fit together you can work out how to change modes or place different pentatonic shapes over the top. I may have gone a little overboard here, but once you understand it, it's exciting.
#8
Quote by Warthchild13
You can use anything you like really, depending on what scale you like and how you want it to sound. I play mostly in Aeolian or Dorian, but love Mixolydian and phrygian. But all the others are great too. Of course these are just the major scales. Try recording in a key, G or A for instance and try playing different modes of the major scale over the top and listen to what you like. As you get to know the major scale and its modes better and how they fit together you can work out how to change modes or place different pentatonic shapes over the top. I may have gone a little overboard here, but once you understand it, it's exciting.
As D said, kindly ignore this post.
#9
Quote by bangoodcharlote
As D said, kindly ignore this post.


Yeah, sorry...too much Don't listen to me
#10
Quote by Warthchild13
Don't listen to me
I couldn't have said it better myself.

Please don't listen to the user Warthchild13 (note the spelling). He lacks a fundamental understanding of modes. Moreover, despite the flaws in his knowledge, he arrogantly dismisses the findings of an experienced user, me, in such a way that is offensive and ridiculous.

However, I am a teacher, so if you have any questions about why your post in inaccurate, please feel free to read the theory lesson in my sig and then ask in MT.


Good day and all the best in your pursuit of accurate knowledge of music.

Regards,
Sue
#11
Quote by bangoodcharlote
I couldn't have said it better myself.

Please don't listen to the user Warthchild13 (note the spelling). He lacks a fundamental understanding of modes. Moreover, despite the flaws in his knowledge, he arrogantly dismisses the findings of an experienced user, me, in such a way that is offensive and ridiculous.

However, I am a teacher, so if you have any questions about why your post in inaccurate, please feel free to read the theory lesson in my sig and then ask in MT.


Good day and all the best in your pursuit of accurate knowledge of music.

Regards,
Sue


Yeah, I realise my knowledge has a long way to go, and I can see some of the flaws in my post. I did not arrogantly dismiss anyone though. My post was just my own excitement about what I am learning, and I have agreed that the thread opener should ignore my unhelpful ramblings. Sorry.
PS. I hate the typo in my name but haven't got around to figuring out how to change it or to create a new a/c.
PPS. What's MT?
#12
^ MT is Musicians Talk - the forum for talk about theory etc.

Sue - please don't get bitchy at other users on here. This is the UG Community, not the UG School of Musical Excellence - could you be a bit more understanding to the people on here, most of whom are under 18.
Last edited by blue_strat at Jul 15, 2008,
#13
What if I wanted to solo using A minor pent. and G major? For example a song I know contains the Aminor chord and G major in the intro; the verse alternates between G, Am, C and D. When I solo using the Am pent and G major over the intro/bridge, it sounds good. Would this be solosing with arpeggios?
#14
You could also use an e blues or g blues scale or even a g blues scale with the major third(b) thrown in as well as the minor third.
#15
Quote by :-D
That would depend entirely on what exact chords are being played.

Someone will inevitably say "E minor". Ignore that post.



Not trying to be a smartass, just wondering why E-Minor should be ignored?
#16
You can use mostly anything. If your ear says it sounds good, go for it. If you are a beginner to soloing, stick with the choices you made so far. The Am pentatonic is a nice choice. You can also use the Bm and Em pentatonic scales. The Bm pent would sound good on your D and G.

It all depends how far you want to go in soloing. Is it a full blown song with lyrics or is it merely an instrumental? There are so many sounds available to you that the more advice you get, the easier it will be to get confused.

As for asking if its arpeggios, the answer would be no. The arpeggio is basically a broken chord, so you would play your 1st, 3rd and 5th interval to outline the triad. But, you wouldn't want to outline the triad of the chord you are playing as that would be redundant. take the relevant triad shape and play it from the 5th or 7th interval of the relevant chord and you change the sound nicely.

In songwriting, flavour where you need to, otherwise just leave it alone if your riff or progression is strong enough without it.

Hope this helps
Last edited by evolucian at Jul 24, 2008,
#17
That song would be in the key of G (because of the D chord). The easiest way to tell the key at this point is its whatever chord the song wants to end on.

I don't know what scales you know but for most styles your choices over a G major progression would be:

Safest: G Major Pentatonic (AKA country/western scale)

Slightly less safe: Major Blues(Maj Pent with b3 added), Hexatonic major (Maj Pent with the 4 added, think Allman Brothers)

Less safe/maybe more interesting(You'll need to bend): Minor pentatonic, Dorian mode (like minor pentatonic with the 2 & 6 from the major scale added)and/or the Blues scale (like min pent with a b5).

You can switch back and forth to build tension and dramatic structure in your solo. There are a million things you could play over anything, but these choices will either sound 'correct' or clash a bit in cool and recognizable way.
#18
Quote by XianXiuHong
Not trying to be a smartass, just wondering why E-Minor should be ignored?
A scale is defined by its context, not position, pattern, box, or shape. If you play "the E minor scale" over a G major progression, your root is G, so you should name the scale by its G name, G major.

If you play the notes G A B C D E F# over a G major progression, in any order, anywhere on the guitar, it is always G major.
#19
Quote by XianXiuHong
Not trying to be a smartass, just wondering why E-Minor should be ignored?

Look at BGC's post right above mine, this is the exact reason.