#1
hi everyone, i joined a guitar class today and they gave us our teaching books today.
before going into the class, i knew the basic chords. When i got home, and looked through the book, some of the chords were wronG! eg, they say on an f chord you strum 5 STrings instead of four! and a c chord is played on all 6 strings! is this acceptable? or is it something i should talk to the teacher about?
#2
There are many ways to play every chord. However, learning why certain chords are written the way they are will benefit you, so please do ask your teacher.
#4
I personally like playing the C chord with all six strings. I add a G in there for the low E string. I also never play the open F chord, I always bar the first fret and use the E position. I'll stop talking now.

+1 for BanGoodCharlotte. There are many, many ways to play each chord, and you shouldn't get hung up on it.
Do NOT look behind you.
#6
If the book is to show you some basic chords it should explain the root positions of the chords. Anytime that a chord is played the root should be in the bass. If not it is an inverted chord.

You did not say what positions those chords are in. Are they open chords or barre chords?

The roots of the chords are found on the 6th, 5th, and the 4th strings depending on what the chord shapes it is.
#7
they were open position, but the strums just seemed wrong. it said to play onen c on all six strings without muting the sixth, it was just kind of weird
#9
Quote by mrb0ston
they were open position, but the strums just seemed wrong. it said to play onen c on all six strings without muting the sixth, it was just kind of weird


That would put the E (III of C major) in the bass so it's a 1st inversion or C/E.

That's acceptable but why?

Same thing with that F chord. Since you're not using the 6th string the root is on the 4th and hitting the 5th string makes it an inverted chord again. In this case the C (V of F major) is in the bass so it's a 2nd inversion or F/C.

Again why?

Must be something in the book to explain all that.

EDIT: I've just realized something, is that C major fretted on the 6th string (3rd fret)? In that case it's the G (V of C major) in the root and make it a 2nd inversion.
Last edited by PanHead at Jul 15, 2008,
#10
you can play a C like this on all 6 strings (non bar chord form):

E-0
B-1
G-0
D-2
A-3
E-3
AROUND THE WORLD



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#11
in both of the examples you described, all that is happening (from what i can guess) is that an extra 3rd is being added to the chord. nothing to worry about.
#12
ahh fuhgeddaboutit, ill just play how i want to play, i know this though, after this class is over i'm never looking at that book again, it's a little childish
#13
Each cord can be played many alternate ways at different positions on the fret board. A chord book with every version of every chord would look like a phone book.
#14
Quote by mrb0ston
ahh fuhgeddaboutit, ill just play how i want to play, i know this though, after this class is over i'm never looking at that book again, it's a little childish


I agree with you and there's a way to learn chords, the notes themselves. A simplest chord is a triad which is three notes, root, 3rd, and the 5th. Find all that on your fretboard and you have your chords in many possible combinations. Throw in a 7th and there's less combinations (fingering-wise) to choose from.