#1
Alright, so i was on wikipedia reading about Keith Richards and i came across this line:

"Richards often uses guitars with open tunings which allow for syncopated and ringing I-IV chording..."

Im aware of what open tunings are and that Richards uses them but i dont understand what is being said in this statement.

Anyone?
#2
Well syncopation is when you accent notes that aren't usually accented like notes that don't fall on the beat. It's very common in most music but is strongly associated with reggae and similar styles.

In a major key the diatonic chords in order are major, minor, minor, major, major, minor, diminished. In C major, this is C maj, D min, E min, F maj, G maj, A min, B dim. Written with numerals this is I ii iii IV V vi vii°. So I-IV in C major is C major to F major. I'm not sure what this has to do with Richards' use of open tunings.
#4
Quote by RichieJovie
Perhaps they are trying to intimate that Keef tends to have A-D C-F type riffs. Although quite often he does just add the sus4 for his trademark kinds of riffs, although that is a massive generalisation.

This is pretty much what i reasoned as the intended meaning, but like u said: massive generalisation.

...btw, "Keef", love it
#5
Quote by RichieJovie
Perhaps they are trying to intimate that Keef tends to have A-D C-F type riffs. Although quite often he does just add the sus4 for his trademark kinds of riffs, although that is a massive generalisation.


You mean... insinuate?

Not being a dick, just... confused is all.
#6
Quote by Wonthefu
You mean... insinuate?

Not being a dick, just... confused is all.

Intimate 2
Verb
[-mating, -mated] Formal
1. to make (something) known in an indirect way: he has intimated his intention to retire
2. to announce [Late Latin intimare to proclaim]
intimation n

The joys of being English
#7
^Since your english and seem to be well educated could you answer this question? Why does almost every englishman spell learned this way "learnt". Is that correct over there? Sorry to be off topic but it just happens so often that I thought that it might be the correct way over there.
#9
Quote by /-\liceNChains
^Since your english and seem to be well educated could you answer this question? Why does almost every englishman spell learned this way "learnt". Is that correct over there? Sorry to be off topic but it just happens so often that I thought that it might be the correct way over there.


Learnt is the past tense, you have already acquired that knowledge.
#10
Quote by dispreferred
Alright, so i was on wikipedia reading about Keith Richards and i came across this line:

"Richards often uses guitars with open tunings which allow for syncopated and ringing I-IV chording..."

Im aware of what open tunings are and that Richards uses them but i dont understand what is being said in this statement.

Anyone?


Basically you can play the I all open (or a straight bar) and "blend in" the IV by
just a simple addition of a note or two. The fingering is so simple for this in
open G that you can really easily do interesting rhytmic stuff with the picking.

The voicings in open G are SO characteristicly Stones.
#11
Quote by Ænimus Prime

Thanks for that. In america few people say learnt and I was always wondering this. In america when someone says that instead of learned it usually is surrounded by lots of bad english so I assumed it was incorrect. "Ghetto" kids or what I think you call "chavs" over there say this but they also say "in they" instead of "in their" and "I aint got no" instead of "I don't have any".