#1
My guitar, a Paul Reed Smith SE One, arrived yesterday. I tuned up and practiced for about eight hours, determined that I was going to at least get four chords--the open F, C, D7, and D--to sound clearly before I went to bed. I was starting to get a little droopy-eyed, so I put the guitar away and went off intending to take a short nap which ended up being almost a full night's sleep. When I woke up, I picked up the guitar again, and--bang! I could play all four chords clearly! I can't quite transition between them as fast as I'd like yet, but I have to remind myself I've been playing for all of one day.

Here I'd been struggling to analyze my every movement, make sure my posture was perfect, hold my fingers at the perfect angle, nothing was working--then I take a rest, pick up the instrument, and suddenly my body knows exactly what to do instinctively. I think what probably happened is that I built up a lot of unnecessary tension through the eight hours of cconstantly trying and not succeeding. When I gave it another shot in a totally relaxed state, everything came together. It's also possible that the sleep gave my brain a chance to fully process the coordination.

I'm going to make a conscious effort to maintain that state of relaxation all the time.

I was starting to get a little worried that my fingertips were just too thick for the instrument, that chords might just be physically impossible. I KNEW that couldn't be the case because although I have the biggest hands overall of anyone I personally know, my fingers aren't exceptionally thick. I've seen some very fat-fingered people play beautifully. But I was started to worry just a bit.

Anyway. Has anyone else had the guitar fairy visit you in your sleep?
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#2
If you try and play to hard, it is alot harder

Coming to play it without 8 hours of playing, you probably had a bit of a clearer head

I can always play better in te morning
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#4
Actually its not that uncommon/strange, this is how the brain works during night - it will go and reprocess what you experienced during the day and especially moments that you paid a lot of attention to. Especially if your problem is not a physical (cant stretch or whatever) but more 'understanding' curve, spend a 15min on a riff that you cant figure out and remember just before going to bed and continue on next day - miracles can happen. Same thing is true for 'muscle memory' too (stretching, syncing both hands etc).
Anyways you got the point, now only take advantage of it
#5
eventually it just comes to you...I remember trying alternate picking and failing at it, but I kept trying and all of a sudden I was doing it automatically
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#6
Wait.... You got a PRS and you can play 4 chords?
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#7
Hmm, I tried real hard to sweep pick 5 strings and just couldn't. I went on holiday to spain for a month and didn't touch a guitar. I came back at 3am, went straight upstairs...and I could do it...it was awesome
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#8
All learning works like this, after intense practice both brain and body needs rest. Happy to hear you nailed the chords :-)
#9
That happens to me all the time. Ill often try to learn something new maybe an hour or so before I goto sleep because I know after I sleep Ill be that much better at playing it the next time.
#10
Quote by Therion42
My guitar, a Paul Reed Smith SE One, arrived yesterday. I tuned up and practiced for about eight hours, determined that I was going to at least get four chords--the open F, C, D7, and D--to sound clearly before I went to bed. I was starting to get a little droopy-eyed, so I put the guitar away and went off intending to take a short nap which ended up being almost a full night's sleep. When I woke up, I picked up the guitar again, and--bang! I could play all four chords clearly! I can't quite transition between them as fast as I'd like yet, but I have to remind myself I've been playing for all of one day.

Here I'd been struggling to analyze my every movement, make sure my posture was perfect, hold my fingers at the perfect angle, nothing was working--then I take a rest, pick up the instrument, and suddenly my body knows exactly what to do instinctively. I think what probably happened is that I built up a lot of unnecessary tension through the eight hours of cconstantly trying and not succeeding. When I gave it another shot in a totally relaxed state, everything came together. It's also possible that the sleep gave my brain a chance to fully process the coordination.

I'm going to make a conscious effort to maintain that state of relaxation all the time.

I was starting to get a little worried that my fingertips were just too thick for the instrument, that chords might just be physically impossible. I KNEW that couldn't be the case because although I have the biggest hands overall of anyone I personally know, my fingers aren't exceptionally thick. I've seen some very fat-fingered people play beautifully. But I was started to worry just a bit.

Anyway. Has anyone else had the guitar fairy visit you in your sleep?

I did that same thing with the halo theme, practiced all night could'nt get it right then bam in the morning I could play it perfect.
#12
You were thinking too hard. If I sit there and grind on the same thing over and over, I start to make a lot of mistakes. If I set it down for a while, when I come back to it, I'm usually able to play much better than when I left it, because I'm not over-thinking it when I come back to it. Most of my time spent learning chords is actually done while watching TV. I just hold the chord during the show, and only play during commercials. This way not only am I building up my muscle memory, but I'm not over-playing.
#14
Sometimes it just clicks.

I remember when I was just starting, one day it just happened that I could change between chords smoothly.
It's Only Rock and Roll, But I like It
#15
it hapenes to me all the time. i learn a certain riff or a solo and i just memorize it the first day, and dont even bother to play it clearly or without mistake, at least not to much. And the next day i can usualy play it almost perfect.
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#16
that kinda thing didn't happen to me with chords, but one day, my chord SWITCHING magically clicked... same thing with bar chords
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#17
Quote by Alter-Bridge
Wait.... You got a PRS and you can play 4 chords?


Haha I was thinking that also.

But anyways, your brain doesnt learn stuff right away. Like someone said, it's not uncommon but they wont happen to you too often.
#18
Quote by Therion42


I'm going to make a conscious effort to maintain that state of relaxation all the time.




If your makeing a concsious effort to do anything, then there's no way you can be completly relaxed....I here beer works quite nicely to relax you, then again there is the whole 'liver cancer' thing. You should probably just smoke weed.
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#19
Screw the PRS and the fact he can only play 4 chords... how is he playing an open F in standard?
#20
Dude, how much did you pay for your first guitar? :P You can't give it up now.. under pain of death!

Open F probably means this:

Not really open I guess..
#21
Thats why you learn chords/patterns, mate. Your body remembers them, almost as.. musculear memory. Switch back and forth between the chords, and in no longer than a week, you can play these chords fast after eachother, all clear, without even paying attention to the fretboard.

It's weird. I am no psychiatrist and do not know the right term for it, but i just believe that your brain has worked in that move, or, chord, you know, muscle-wise, so that your.. bah.. i give up xD .. But yea, happens whenever i learn something new... Which is.. sadly.. long ago now.

I need to learn some theory.. never got started.. too tired.. too drunk.. too.. all kinds of stuff, all of the time xD
#22
Take note from this experience.
If you apply the same learning/practice technique to everything you do, you'll advance more and more quickly.
#24
^ Lol

Quote by Alter-Bridge
Wait.... You got a PRS and you can play 4 chords?

this fact makes me sad
Been away, am back
#25
Quote by pr4ctic4l
That happens to me all the time. Ill often try to learn something new maybe an hour or so before I goto sleep because I know after I sleep Ill be that much better at playing it the next time.


Same here

It's scary how well it works sometimes.
#27
Reminds me of my first attempts at barre chords. First day I tried them it was all "how the HELL am I gonna hold all the strings down to the frets with my index finger" and I could never sound them clearly. I basically tell the barre chord to eff off and a few days later I try it again and it just worked. :S
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#30
so? hes probably richer than you


would you drive a ford if you could afford a ferrari?
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#31
Quote by gishuk
so? hes probably richer than you


would you drive a ford if you could afford a ferrari?


I'm soooo sigging that. xD

On Topic: During my first few months I tried learning the intro riff to Master of Puppets, and not only could I not pick fast enough, I was stressing over it and kept hitting the wrong frets (pretty retarded now that I look back on it)

So I put my crappy guitar on the stand and took a break. Came back 4 days later and now I can rip that riff apart...

The rest of it i'm still having trouble with though. XD
#32
Quote by gishuk
so? hes probably richer than you


would you drive a ford if you could afford a ferrari?


Why buy a Ferrari if you can't drive?
#33
your neurons need time to make connections, when you sleep your body goes to work making these connections because there isnt much else to do, then you wake up and your brain is set to do things properly (only if you practice properly before sleep)

and thats why its the best time to practice (besides all the time)

i want a PRS dammit
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#34
Quote by Ze_Metal
Why buy a Ferrari if you can't drive?


Tou-****in'-ché

I understand what you're going through TS, but more with barres and stretches. Especially with stretches, really. I remember feeling like my hand was about to tear itself apart when playing, say, a sus2 chord. Then one day, BAM, I could do it. I was amased.

Of course, I have to say, a certain Petrucci exercise helped get there.
#35
Quote by Axalon
Reminds me of my first attempts at barre chords. First day I tried them it was all "how the HELL am I gonna hold all the strings down to the frets with my index finger" and I could never sound them clearly. I basically tell the barre chord to eff off


This is as far as I've gotten :p

Well I can get by I guess, but still waiting for that epiphany that makes them easy to do!
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#36
when I first learned the song kryptonite that my band is playing now, this was like a year ago, I couldn't get the chord progression, I tried for a very long time and just couldn't get it. About 1 month and 1/2 ago when my band started doing it I was frustated because I still couldn't get it and I am a really good guitar player IMO I just couldn't seem to get it. Finally the day after a nights sleep a could play it perfectly.
#37
I love it when this happens. Happened only a few days ago when my fingers wouldn't work with me. They had a mind of their own, the next day I could play the piece perfectly.