#1
Hi...

For example, if i had a song in 'C' with the progression C-F-G, what other chords could i use in the same song/instrumental as well? Is there a rule?

Also, in the I-IV-V progression, can i use any chord variation i like depending on the sound i wanted to go for, mixing and matching major, minor, 7th chords etc. So instead of C-F-G for example, i could use C7-Fadd9-G7 or even C-Fmaj7-G6 or whatever.

Thanks for any advice.
#3
The chords in C are C Dm Em F G Am and Bdim, so any of those chords would work. The formula for the chords in a key is I ii iii IV V vi viidim, where lower case means minor.

Another way of working it out is to play a C (or whatever key you want it to be in) major triad, then move all the notes up one note of the scale each time, including any sharps or flats in the key.
#5
Quote by geetarmanic
Also, in the I-IV-V progression, can i use any chord variation i like depending on the sound i wanted to go for, mixing and matching major, minor, 7th chords etc. So instead of C-F-G for example, i could use C7-Fadd9-G7 or even C-Fmaj7-G6 or whatever.
Yep. Generally though, its a good idea to stay in key. Just so you know, C7 is not in the key of C
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#6
Quote by Ænimus Prime


Just so you know, C7 is not in the key of C


Ah, that's interesting, i didn't know that. According to one the the earlier posts, the chords in C are 'C Dm Em F G Am and Bdim'... but how do i work out if and which 7th or sus or minor7th etc. chords can also be used? Thanks.
#8
^By knowing which notes are in the scale. C7 contains the notes C E G Bb. There is no Bb in the key. There is a B natural. C E G B is Cmaj7.

Edit: That was to geetarmanic.
Last edited by werty22 at Jul 15, 2008,
#10
You can use that C7 if you want to modulate keys in during your song.

Like so:
C>F>G>C7>F>A#>F>C

Use the dom 7th of that key in order to modulate to the 4th of that major scale.


in A harmonic minor, the 4th is D. So to go from the key of A harm minor to Dm you would use an A7.

Perhaps bandagoodwhatever can explain it better.
#11
Quote by ouchies
Well in C the chords would be..

CM7, Dm7, Em7, FM7, G7, Am7 and B diminished

The dominant chord is the fifth degree of the major scale.. So C7 would be in the key of F Major.


Listing the diatonic 7ths eh?

B is half diminished I believe
#12
Quote by TroM
Perhaps bangoodcharlotecan explain it better.
I'll try.

First, that A# should be Bb.


Now for the 7th chords. A dom7 chord (such as G7) wants to go to a chord a 4th higher. You find this chord by taking the root note, G, and going up a 4th to C. Therefore, G7 to C is a good resolution.

You can use this to change keys with some ease. If you're playing in the key of C and want to change to F, you could play C7 to F in order to transition. An example of this is C F C G7 C C7 F F, the bold being your new key, F, and the italic being the transition chord.

Changing between minor keys works the same way, just with minor chords. V7 - i is a good resolution, so E7 - Am sounds good, A7 - Dm, B7 - Em, etc. If you want to switch between two minor keys, apply the same idea. Am C Am A7 Dm Bb C Dm uses this.


FYI, everyone, my name is "Bangoodcharlote." Please note the spelling and please write it properly when summoning my assistance. Thanks.
#13
I'll try.

First, that A# should be Bb.


Now for the 7th chords. A dom7 chord (such as G7) wants to go to a chord a 4th higher. You find this chord by taking the root note, G, and going up a 4th to C. Therefore, G7 to C is a good resolution.

You can use this to change keys with some ease. If you're playing in the key of C and want to change to F, you could play C7 to F in order to transition. An example of this is C F C G7 C C7 F F, the bold being your new key, F, and the italic being the transition chord.

Changing between minor keys works the same way, just with minor chords. V7 - i is a good resolution, so E7 - Am sounds good, A7 - Dm, B7 - Em, etc. If you want to switch between two minor keys, apply the same idea. Am C Am A7 Dm Bb C Dm uses this.


FYI, everyone, my name is "Bangoodcharlote." Please note the spelling and please write it properly when summoning my assistance. Thanks.

Good post


I seriously lol'd at the end, women always want more..
#14
Quote by geetarmanic
Also, in the I-IV-V progression, can i use any chord variation i like depending on the sound i wanted to go for, mixing and matching major, minor, 7th chords etc. So instead of C-F-G for example, i could use C7-Fadd9-G7 or even C-Fmaj7-G6 or whatever.


Well, here's a lesson that you might find useful: http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/columns/the_guide_to/absolute_beginners_guide_to_chord_progressions.html

A few things to keep in mind: the dominant 7th would usually be written as G7, even though the article sometimes labels it as "Gmaj7" accidentally implying that the dominant is a major 7th. Also, the diminished 7th built off of the 7th degree (which, in C major, is B) could be a half-diminished 7th, though the article implies that it is a fully-diminished 7th. Also, the article doesn't deal with substitutions in a minor key, which would be a little bit different.
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#15
I'll try.

First, that A# should be Bb.


Now for the 7th chords. A dom7 chord (such as G7) wants to go to a chord a 4th higher. You find this chord by taking the root note, G, and going up a 4th to C. Therefore, G7 to C is a good resolution.

You can use this to change keys with some ease. If you're playing in the key of C and want to change to F, you could play C7 to F in order to transition. An example of this is C F C G7 C C7 F F, the bold being your new key, F, and the italic being the transition chord.

Changing between minor keys works the same way, just with minor chords. V7 - i is a good resolution, so E7 - Am sounds good, A7 - Dm, B7 - Em, etc. If you want to switch between two minor keys, apply the same idea. Am C Am A7 Dm Bb C Dm uses this.


FYI, everyone, my name is "Bangoodcharlote." Please note the spelling and please write it properly when summoning my assistance. Thanks.

That's what I was trying to say...but I'm not good at putting it all in words.
#16
Going a bit beyond 7th chords, you can use more extensions. As long as the notes are in the key. Like in C major, I -IV -V is C - F - G.

So C(add9) - Fmaj7 - G6/9 would work.

C(add9): C E G D
Fmaj7: F A C E
G6/9: G B D E A

All in C major!