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#1
Aye, guys..i need help again. I already know that i am suppose to play a scale on a key according to the rythm guitar, but i still can't produce nice sounds. I find myself sticking only to that one scale and simply going back and forth. Is there any technique that can help me imrpove,and know when to switch to a higher or lower key? thx guys~
#2
Learning a bunch of scales should help. Also, learning some other peoples solo's kind of gives you the idea of how to peice some things together, so that will help alot as well. I don't know what music you listen to, but just pick some of the songs you like from a couple of bands and maybe learn some of those.
#3
Look at lots of different scales and practice soloing with them all then after a while you should start to learn what sounds good.
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#4
Get last months Total guitar Magazine. It come with a book that has a bunch of the most useful, and awesome sounding scales that cut out all the BS. It's Called 'The BullS*it Free Scale Book'
Gear: Warmoth Soloist / Hondo Acou. / Ibanez AS73

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#5
Quote by NoobOnZone
Aye, guys..i need help again. I already know that i am suppose to play a scale on a key according to the rythm guitar, but i still can't produce nice sounds. I find myself sticking only to that one scale and simply going back and forth. Is there any technique that can help me imrpove,and know when to switch to a higher or lower key? thx guys~

Stop playing scales, simple as. Learning more scales won't help either, that'll only confuse matters more.

Use scales by all means, but don't play them. Work out the key you're in, find your root notes and use a combination of a scale that fits and the chord tones you're playing over to make something that sounds nice. Understanding the underlying chords is also vital, notes perform different functions over different chords within a progression.

Improvising is hard, think about the process for a second....you're trying to create something on the fly with limited knowledge and, crucially, experience. Not only that, you have to express what you've created using a piece of equipment that you have limited ability on.

In short, you've got no chance just trying to do it like that, you've got to break things down and teach yourself how to do it. The first thing is simply figuring out what it is you want to say in your solo, you're not going to be able to do that on the spot so plan things out a little beforehand. Think of some ideas and phrases that you want to incorporate and work them out in your head first, then sing them. to yourself to really internalise the sounds. Once you've done that you can look at figuring them out on the guitar, and finally look at incorporating them into your playing.

Keep doing that, day in, day out...playing with ideas and exploring what you can do with the scale, as opposed to the scale itself. You don't even need the guitar, you've probably listened to enough music to know what guitar solos sound like and waht they're typically composed of. The more you familarize yourself with how the notes work together the stronger the association between the sounds and the physical actions becomes.
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#6
so scales are really just an outline? i don';t have to follow the notes they give me?
#7
Quote by steven seagull
Stop playing scales, simple as. Learning more scales won't help either, that'll only confuse matters more.


Are you MENTAL?!

It's completely the other way round. Now i don't usually go off klike this, but i've had 2 cappuccinos and a Short black, i'm blazing (guess where's thats from).

Stop playing solos, scales improve timing, technique, speed and accuracy. I stayed on two scales for a week each till i was through a scale book. (not the one i mentioned above).

That what you should be concentrating on. There are so many things you can do with scales. Instead of learning solos, you could be MAKING them with scales, just re-arrange the way they're put together.

Scales Are Awesome.
Gear: Warmoth Soloist / Hondo Acou. / Ibanez AS73

Hardwire TL-2 / Boss GE-7 / Electro Harmonix Small Stone Nano / Boss DD-3 / MXR Smart Gate / Ibanez TS9 / Unknown Tremolo

Bugera V55 / Home Made Cab w/ Celestion Speakers G12M & G12T
#8
Quote by SG310user
Are you MENTAL?!

It's completely the other way round. Now i don't usually go off klike this, but i've had 2 cappuccinos and a Short black, i'm blazing (guess where's thats from).

Stop playing solos, scales improve timing, technique, speed and accuracy. I stayed on two scales for a week each till i was through a scale book. (not the one i mentioned above).

That what you should be concentrating on. There are so many things you can do with scales. Instead of learning solos, you could be MAKING them with scales, just re-arrange the way they're put together.

Scales Are Awesome.

Wow, you totaly missed the great point he made.


And in regards to the TS. When i was starting to get into soloing and tried to learn scales what i would do is put the scale infront of me so i could see it, and just put on a song i like and i would just play along. i kept doing this until i learned the whole scale up and down the neck, while also learning how to improvise. You quickly start to learn what works and what doesnt.
Last edited by Fatty Sizzler at Jul 15, 2008,
#9
Quote by SG310user
Are you MENTAL?!

It's completely the other way round. Now i don't usually go off klike this, but i've had 2 cappuccinos and a Short black, i'm blazing (guess where's thats from).

Stop playing solos, scales improve timing, technique, speed and accuracy. I stayed on two scales for a week each till i was through a scale book. (not the one i mentioned above).

That what you should be concentrating on. There are so many things you can do with scales. Instead of learning solos, you could be MAKING them with scales, just re-arrange the way they're put together.

Scales Are Awesome.

Playing scales serves no real purpose other than teaching you how to play scales...playing scales doesn't equate to learning them. Playing actual solos is far more constructive.

so scales are really just an outline? i don';t have to follow the notes they give me?

A scale is just a sequence of notes that is known to sound good together - however that doesn't mean that the notes that aren't in a given scale won't sound equally good if used correctly. For example, a chromatic shift from a minor second to the root can sound really good when resolving to the root using the natural minor scale.
Actually called Mark!

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Last edited by steven seagull at Jul 15, 2008,
#10
Quote by Fatty Sizzler
Wow, you totaly missed the great point he made.


Yeah, i prolly did. i didn't read it all.
Gear: Warmoth Soloist / Hondo Acou. / Ibanez AS73

Hardwire TL-2 / Boss GE-7 / Electro Harmonix Small Stone Nano / Boss DD-3 / MXR Smart Gate / Ibanez TS9 / Unknown Tremolo

Bugera V55 / Home Made Cab w/ Celestion Speakers G12M & G12T
#11
Quote by NoobOnZone
Aye, guys..i need help again. I already know that i am suppose to play a scale on a key according to the rythm guitar, but i still can't produce nice sounds. I find myself sticking only to that one scale and simply going back and forth. Is there any technique that can help me imrpove,and know when to switch to a higher or lower key? thx guys~

Make sure you realize that a scale is not just a box. it is all over the neck. once you have it in your head where these notes are you will be able to do so many thngs. there are many things you can do with the notes to make them sound more interesting. you mentioned you find yourself only going back and forth, try sliding to other parts of the neck, then do a bend, maybey play more than one note at a time. also you can play out of the scale, try playing a note outside of the scale but slide into a note that is part of it, or do chromatic runs but end on a note in the scale. and always play along to something, be it a jam track or one of your favorite songs; this will help you pick the right notes. even though all the notes in the scale will technicaly be corect, the chords you are playing over shouldnt be ignored, you will start to notice what notes sound right with what chords.just keep at it and it will start to feel natural.
Last edited by Fatty Sizzler at Jul 15, 2008,
#12
Quote by steven seagull
Playing scales serves no real purpose other than teaching you how to play scales...playing scales doesn't equate to learning them. Playing actual solos is far more constructive.


A scale is just a sequence of notes that is known to sound good together - however that doesn't mean that the notes that aren't in a given scale won't sound equally good if used correctly. For example, a chromatic shift from a minor second to the root can sound really good when resolving to the root using the natural minor scale.


so..i completely ignore scales and improvise through experience? But even so, i still solo around the key, right?
#13
ah i get it...you think that i am simple going from 6th string to 5th,then 4th to 3rd all the way to first according to a scale? is that what you mean?

i use random notes on the scale...adding in bends and hammer ons,but it is still very bleh
#14
Quote by NoobOnZone
so..i completely ignore scales and improvise through experience? But even so, i still solo around the key, right?

He was saying it is more constuctive to learn solos form other people instead of just playing back and forth through scales. Im assuming he is saying this because you will be learning how scales are used to make music. Dont ignore scales though. learning a scale up and down the neck will do nothing but help you. And yes, stay in key.

Quote by NoobOnZone
ah i get it...you think that i am simple going from 6th string to 5th,then 4th to 3rd all the way to first according to a scale? is that what you mean?

i use random notes on the scale...adding in bends and hammer ons,but it is still very bleh

Ah ok. well, you are on the right track. the more you play the better you will get. Do you know the scale up and down the neck?
Last edited by Fatty Sizzler at Jul 15, 2008,
#15
Quote by NoobOnZone

i use random notes on the scale...adding in bends and hammer ons,but it is still very bleh



Random notes sound random. Most likely not anything anyone will find interesting.
Interesting playing has INTENT. A thousand monkeys banging away on a thousand
keyboards for a thousand years are unlikely to say anything interesting with
random letters.

Memorizing a scale, doesn't give you any skill using it. Now that you've memorized
it, you can begin to acquire skill. That comes from more knowledge, practice, study,
experience, and even more memorization.
#16
Try learning the scale in terms of intervals, and start to play those intervals in different areas of the fretboard, not just learning shapes that go up and down.
#18
Listen to your favorite stuff and try and pick out techniques that are used. One that I learned early on was doing scales in threes. Play three notes, go back one note, and play the next three.

You get that going forwards and backwards and it sounds wicked.
Gibson.
#19
I wouldn't advise avoiding scales at all, that's a terrible idea.

Playing them by yourself may be unmusical but they are infact the roadmap to the fretboard. Everything you can play is a scale of some sort so once you gain the muscle memory and the ability to play smoothly around the fretboard the scale shape will only be a guideline to what your ear wants to hear.

I equate it to language you have to learn the words before you can speak freely. The scales being the words in this case. Not to mention it saves you a hell a lot of time in the long run. If you sat down and learned solos from tabs you might get em down perfect but you'd never really know what you were playing which would hurt your improvising. If you sit down with someone in a free jam or play to a backing track the tab finger numbers won't help you in a situation like that.
Last edited by Silky Smooth at Jul 16, 2008,
#20
al right..but when i search for a scale like..lets say the minor pentatonic scale, i get so many different ones like this

which one do i choose?
#26
Quote by NoobOnZone
lol..sure thats still a scale? how do i know which are in the key of lets say...E?

Simple, you learn the notes on the fretboard.

You can't really learn anything about scales until you do that anyway so you may as well start at the beginning.
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#29
erm,anywhere i can find the picture of the blues minor pentatonic scale along the whole fret board with the root notes?
#30
Well, I would reccomend the ultimate scale book by Troy Stetina, it can be found quite cheap on Amazon and should clear everything up
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#31
Quote by NoobOnZone
even single note..?

Yes, all the notes. Honestly, there's little point trying to go any further with scales until you've learned the notes because you're not going to be able to actually learn much of anything.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#32
Quote by NoobOnZone
erm,anywhere i can find the picture of the blues minor pentatonic scale along the whole fret board with the root notes?

Take the one from the vid, i believe it shows up to the 12th fret. From 13th-24th, its a repeat except an octave higher

Edit: May want to check this out,good lesson on minor scales.
http://www.cyberfret.com/scales/minor-pentatonic/index.php
Last edited by FenderStRaT RS at Jul 16, 2008,
#33
Quote by steven seagull
Yes, all the notes. Honestly, there's little point trying to go any further with scales until you've learned the notes because you're not going to be able to actually learn much of anything.


hey,but won't it only help me in finding the key? i still won't be able to solo well if i only know the notes and no sweet spots..and,notes in the sense of A,B,C,D,E,F,G...how about the notes imbetween?
#35
Quote by NoobOnZone
hey,but won't it only help me in finding the key? i still won't be able to solo well if i only know the notes and no sweet spots..and,notes in the sense of A,B,C,D,E,F,G...how about the notes imbetween?

i linked the pentetonic scale earlier, the whole neck worth of it, go look at that . Put a song you like on, and just improvise while letting the scale guide you. mess around untill you find the right key by shifting the scale up or down until you find it. keep doing this you will eventualy memorize the scale while simultaniously learning what sounds good and what notes to play at what times.
#37
Quote by NoobOnZone
the key starts at a note..i can find it immediately, can't i?

yes, practicaly. play notes on the e sting till you find one that fits, and see if it works, if it doesnt you just have to shift one more time and you will be on the key... if that makes sense.
#40
Quote by NoobOnZone
well,i can just find the notes of the e string and start from there..

well,thx guys,but maybe this video would help? i really want to be able to solo like this guy..not the ending or middle party of his solo,but right at the starting...http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tawEuTNRmVA

you mean when he is just picking from the chords or after that?
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