#1
Okay, im a classically trained violinist and, after being on the guitar off and on for a year i have found one thing that kinda bothers me. The lack of a certain element, to be specific. I mean, i wouldn't expect them to be on tabs, but on the sheet music? Where are the:

DYNAMICS!!!!!


I have never seen any on sheet music for electric guitar. EVER. I miss seeing:

ppp
pp
p
mp
mf
f
ff
fff

Where ARE they?!!!!?!? Obvious answer: All electric guitar dynamics are FFF. Be CREATIVE.
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#3
Just because it isnt written, doesnt mean it doesnt exist
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#4
No, with electric guitar music it's generally left up to interpretation. By not specifically giving dynamics, it gives performers the freedom to put them in themselves. It's not a lack of dynamics, it's a lack of dictated dynamics.
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#5
haha so im not the only one noticing this. join the club. i read the sheets for violin and piano, but for guitar, i just use tabs. is much more easier. plus the some notes mean the opposite for guitar, so if you keep switching back and forth from piano to guitar to violin, you'll get confused easily.
#6
aren't they in the Guitar Tabs books?
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#7
I guess whoever writes the sheet music is writing the simple notes. Whether you should go piano or forte would be through the musician's decision. Guitar is adding your own style to a song. Unlike piano or violin where you should play the sheet music according to how its written, guitar allows you to play the song with your own style. So if you want to go loud then you can go loud. If you want to go slow, you can go slow. If you want to hit that super-high note just for the hell of it, than do it. If you want to add in that nice vibrato sound, than do that too. It doesn't really matter for guitar.
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#8
I think the real question is, where's all the people that play songs by ear!

And use Guitar Pro and remove the 'View Tab' bit.
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#9
Quote by gwitersnamps
No, with electric guitar music it's generally left up to interpretation. By not specifically giving dynamics, it gives performers the freedom to put them in themselves. It's not a lack of dynamics, it's a lack of dictated dynamics.

+1

classical composers were very precise in what they wrote, the dynamics are an inherent part of their work and therefore documented exactly.

With modern music it's simply no longer seen to be that important, you just play away and interpret it however you feel.
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#10
i kind of miss dynamics, but i tend to just listen to the song and decide for myself, i do add dynamics to powertabs though, if i think it sounds better
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#11
Listening to a song itself to figure out the dynamics can be a good exercise. On top of that, as said above, it gives the artist more freedom.

Besides, most tab's are written by non-professional musicians who lack classical training. The absolute majority of tabs are written as more of a way to nail the notes themselves; for timing and dynamics you'll have to rely on the song.
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Last edited by Bonsaischaap at Jul 15, 2008,
#12
Besides, most tab's are written by non-professional musicians who lack classical training. The absolute majority of tabs are written as more of a way to nail the notes themselves; for timing and dynamics you'll have to rely on the song.


FWIW, my sheet music for Pink Floyd's The Wall has dynamics in it. It doesn't refer to p or f, etc, but it does feature < and > symbols for dynamic volume changes.
#13
Quote by Steve BP
FWIW, my sheet music for Pink Floyd's The Wall has dynamics in it. It doesn't refer to p or f, etc, but it does feature < and > symbols for dynamic volume changes.


Yes, certain tabs have dynamics and such, but I said that most don't (look around UG for a while). Tab books like the one you're talking about are almost always written by professional musicians, unlike the tabs you can find online.
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#14
^ Hi Bonsai -- I wasn't clear when I wrote the post, but I meant to say that I agreed with you and followed up with an example of professional sheet music that included dynamics =^)
#15
Ok well after the mid 80's the greatest bands didn't read or write sheet music, they just played their song, practiced and remembered it. ACDC couldn't read notes, they wrote their songs in chord mode. If you go out and buy a book for your favourite band chances are its either in tab, or chord because after the mid 80's no great band produced a book of sheet music. So the fans (the guitarist like u or me) stopped reading it. So when we wanted to share a song we used tab and that is now the alternative. And to be honest I CANT READ SHEET MUSIC!!!!!! tab is much easier
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#16
I can read sheet music, I just can't translate it to guitar that well (I was trained on a piano, where it's easy).

I do miss dynamics though, just to give a better indication of what the artist felt (It's not like building a bike, you don't have to follow the instructions exactly, if you did, improvisation would be dead).
#17
Quote by steven seagull
+1

classical composers were very precise in what they wrote, the dynamics are an inherent part of their work and therefore documented exactly.

With modern music it's simply no longer seen to be that important, you just play away and interpret it however you feel.


I don't agree I think Dynamics are as important as ever you can't say there is no dynamic range in something like 'Blue Powder' by Vai? It sounds pretty planned to me! You would hear it more live obviously though as records are compressed to buggery.

Re: the original post, if you buy any decent tab book it will include standard notation that does include dynamics. But if you are just playing some straight rock where they are just gunning it the whole way through of course you are going to be seeing as many mezzo-forte and fortissimo symbols.