#1
Is there a metronome out there (one you can buy or one you can download for free) that can count quintuplets and sextuplets?
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#2
It's all about counting the notes yourself, mate. Quintuplets are just 5 notes per beat and sextuplets are 6 notes per beat. You're going to have to count them out manually, no metronome can do that for you.
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The name's Garrett.

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#4
Quote by guitarist792
Is there a metronome out there (one you can buy or one you can download for free) that can count quintuplets and sextuplets?

if you have a computer and the right software you can probably use that to program some quintuplets and sextuplets.

You do want to be able to count them out yourself though but something like this might help you get started.
Si
#5
Quote by guitarist792
Is there a metronome out there (one you can buy or one you can download for free) that can count quintuplets and sextuplets?


all you need from the metronome is the steady beat. Its you that has to learn to count quintuplets and sextuplets. Once you know how, practice counting them to a standard metronome.
shred is gaudy music
#7
reduce sextuplets to their base, triplets... then u can combine 2 triplets to make a sextuplet. There also is a metronome that will count both quintuplets and sextuplets but it will only count it in quarter notes at tops of 208 bpm. if thats enough for you thats good, but Its good to learn it on your own.

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#8
Quote by bootyguard
reduce sextuplets to their base, triplets
While the timing is exactly the same, sextuplets aren't always felt as two groups of 16th note triplets. The rhythm is often felt as "doubled up" triplets, 1 & 2 & 3 & rather than 1 & a 2 & a.

I suggest downloading Powertab. It is free and does exactly what you need.
#9
To count these heavily subdivided divisions, do it in groups.

For sextuplets, the first group will be 7 notes. Play the group starting on the
downbeat and note 7 to coincide exactly with the next downbeat then stop.
Keep doing that until you get the feel for "hitting the downbeats" with the first
group. Then, add the next group in and try hitting the downbeats for both
groups. Keep on addiing groups like that until you can string the whole thing out.