#1
ok so i tried recording a rhythm and lead guitar part. but in the end it just sounded...like crap.

i'm using a Toneport GX with a Metal Shop Add-on. when i recorded it, both guitars sounded really muddy and everything just blends into each other and theres no clarity and definition of each guitar.

i was thinking there was too much gain? i'm confused.
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Quote by Bentheemo
Thats probably some of the best advice I've ever received on here.
#3
Try panning them to opposite sides.
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#6
try changing the sound of the guitar when you record, make the lead more prominent in every way possible. try dropping the dbs on the rhythm too, but youve probably tried that.
#8
Unfortunately you're somewhat limited to how realistic a recording is gonna sound when it's not running through a speaker, but there's a few things you can try.

1) Play around with the EQ in the software you're recording. Dropping the mids and boosting the Bass and Treble tends to give a bit more of a metal rhythm tone without the disgusting sounding nu-metal mids.

2) Turn the gain way down on the rhythm. Even if it sounds fine when playing through the speaker, you have to remember that there's no room noise with direct inject (straight into the computer) recordings, so everything will sound more exaggerated.

3) Add some reverb. Don't overdo it, but the reverb can help with the stereo separation.
#9
Quote by vidgc
Unfortunately you're somewhat limited to how realistic a recording is gonna sound when it's not running through a speaker, but there's a few things you can try.

1) Play around with the EQ in the software you're recording. Dropping the mids and boosting the Bass and Treble tends to give a bit more of a metal rhythm tone without the disgusting sounding nu-metal mids.

2) Turn the gain way down on the rhythm. Even if it sounds fine when playing through the speaker, you have to remember that there's no room noise with direct inject (straight into the computer) recordings, so everything will sound more exaggerated.

3) Add some reverb. Don't overdo it, but the reverb can help with the stereo separation.


i'll try that when i can, because i cannot right now. keep the suggestions coming. i'll try working on it tomorrow, this problem is holding me back because it sounds like crap. so...
Ibanez RG7321
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Quote by Bentheemo
Thats probably some of the best advice I've ever received on here.
#10
I was expecting worse. I'd try cutting some of the low's actually. Just a bit. I've also found that usually, at least in my case, adding just a very.....very light touch of chorus helps both channels to stand out a bit. Not even so much that it would be noticeable really. I don't use that often... usually mostly for chugging riffs. But it may be worth a try.
#11
i usually add a touch of reverb to my guitars and a bit of chorus to my rhythm. but i'm using new models so i haven't quite figured them out yet.
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Quote by Bentheemo
Thats probably some of the best advice I've ever received on here.
#12
Try reducing the mids on the rhythm guitar a bit, and increasing the mids on the lead guitar a bit. That seems to work for me.
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#14
ok so i used two different models. the Big Bottom for my Rhythm and... Metal Shop's Rectifier, i forget what it's called. the Rectifier has less gain for my lead tone. it cleared up the muddiness, and it gave me more clarity. but it still sounds like crap to me. i'm having troubles posting it. but i'll post it as soon as i figure it out.
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Quote by Bentheemo
Thats probably some of the best advice I've ever received on here.
#15
I still say its Gearbox (if you are still using that program)
Tweak the EQ and amp settings some more and make one stand out a little moe than the other.

Dont double the track by copying and pasting, simply re-record. you get some delays and such which make your stereo field sound more full.

I personally think you should move onto other software or try new hardware such as a real amp and mic. If you feel limited, its probably due to Gearbox...
#16
Quote by moody07747
I still say its Gearbox (if you are still using that program)
Tweak the EQ and amp settings some more and make one stand out a little moe than the other.

Dont double the track by copying and pasting, simply re-record. you get some delays and such which make your stereo field sound more full.

I personally think you should move onto other software or try new hardware such as a real amp and mic. If you feel limited, its probably due to Gearbox...


no. i'm not limited to gearbox. i love the Big Bottom for my Rhythm track, it goes well with my seven string. but i don't feel comfortable using it for my Lead track too. i think there will be too much bass and it'll get muddy. i was thinking of cutting the bass of my lead and boosting the mids and treble, but not drowning it with gain either. will that work?
Ibanez RG7321
Dean Evo Special 7
Agile AL-2000
ESP LTD VB-300
Peavey Vypyr 30
General of the 7 String/ERG Legion

Quote by Bentheemo
Thats probably some of the best advice I've ever received on here.
#17
Add mids to the lead. Mids are what make a guitar cut through.

There's a basic understanding in the recording world that you should know: Every track needs it's own frequency range. Having multiple things clogging the same bands is what makes your recording muddy. Your EQ should be adjusted in a way that whatever your trying to mix into it can fit in a "pocket" of frequency.

2nd, turn your gain down on the rhythm to 60-70% of what you think you want it at, and double track.
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#18
Quote by TehNez
Add mids to the lead. Mids are what make a guitar cut through.

There's a basic understanding in the recording world that you should know: Every track needs it's own frequency range. Having multiple things clogging the same bands is what makes your recording muddy. Your EQ should be adjusted in a way that whatever your trying to mix into it can fit in a "pocket" of frequency.

2nd, turn your gain down on the rhythm to 60-70% of what you think you want it at, and double track.


that's what i was thinking.
i was thinking of taking out some of the gain and having two rhythm tracks on each side. but also have my lead on the right? lowering the volume of the rhythm track on the right of course.
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Quote by Bentheemo
Thats probably some of the best advice I've ever received on here.
#19
I would personally center the lead and pan harmonies, but that's up to you.
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#20
Quote by TehNez
I would personally center the lead and pan harmonies, but that's up to you.


i could try that.
Ibanez RG7321
Dean Evo Special 7
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ESP LTD VB-300
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General of the 7 String/ERG Legion

Quote by Bentheemo
Thats probably some of the best advice I've ever received on here.