#2
you would want around 200 watts for gigging and dont get a marshall bass amp they arent very nice also stay away from behringers
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#4
Style of music? Price range?
Quote by gourd42
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#6
With the prices we experience down here you aren't going to get all that much of an amp for 600. Look second hand, but try save up abit more.
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#7
Yeah I was looking in the music shop today, I forgot how expensive amps were (thank god I have my gear sorted out :P). Saw a 175W Line 6 combo for $1195 :/ bloody insane.
#8
I used to have a complex formula written out for "minimum wattage" scenarios.
First, find out whether your guitarist(s) amps are tubed or solid state.
If they are tubed, take their wattage and multiply it by 4.
If they are solid, double it. (Guitar watts seem to always go a ways longer than bass watts... it's cause of the power needed to push the lows.)
If there are two guitarists, add these two numbers together.
Multiply this number by two, and thats the amount of watts you want to have playing for you at a given moment.

For a formula.
x = amount of watts needed for you
a = amount of watts on guitarist 1's amp
b = amount of watts on guitarist 2's amp
Let's say guitarist a uses tube and guitarist b uses solid state
a * 4 + b * 2 = c
c * 4 = x


...
this used to be my formula. It used to never lead me wrong. However, once you get to a certain size, you don't need it.
What I mean is, I play with 2 100 watt tubed guitarists.
Using my formula, I'd need 400 watts per guitarist times 2 guitarists = 800 watts times 4 = 3200 watts.
I don't need that.

If the number gets to be over 400, you basically need 400-500 watts.

If you're just trying to "get by", use that formula.


My advice nowadays, though, is to just shoot for a midrange amp. Aiming to "get by" never works out in the long run.
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#9
it really depends on how loud is your guitarrist
for being heard over drums with 50 watts it can be done without pushing the amp
but guitarrist are can be damn loud, specially when they crank they 100watts tube amp to get a nice overdrive, seriusly if gutarrist stopped cranking their amps so much, bassist would not need much wattage, but on the other hand a loud show is more enjoyable so is ok
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#10
I don't see why anyone would need 100 watt tube anyway, if they're that insecure about the size of their sexual organs I would feel no remorse in telling them to turn the hell down.
#11
If you play to 11 then i would get at least over 300 watts. I have a 150 and i turn it up all the way at practice can't hear me at all...
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#12
This depends, too, on whether or not you have a PA available. If so, then you only need enough amp to hear yourself onstage. Or you can do DI and just utilize monitors.

Not saying this is the ideal setup, but you don't need a 400W + (2) 4x?? cabs necessarily.

If you can't hear the bass over the guitars at practice, get them to turn down. Or find a new band
#13
Quote by AmpleSteak
If you play to 11 then i would get at least over 300 watts. I have a 150 and i turn it up all the way at practice can't hear me at all...

do you actually have strings on your bass? tell your guitarists to turn the hell down and tell your drummer to listen to the rest of the band.

Quote by Froggy McHop
I don't see why anyone would need 100 watt tube anyway, if they're that insecure about the size of their sexual organs I would feel no remorse in telling them to turn the hell down.

LOL Siged
#15
Quote by jb_reborn
do you actually have strings on your bass? tell your guitarists to turn the hell down and tell your drummer to listen to the rest of the band.


It's not that crazy. I have a very average drummer, volume-wise and a 100 watt amp. I usually have to have it at around 9. With his guitarist brother I was struggling to be heard on full.
#17
If you're going to run through a PA system you could get away with 150 watts.
If not, in a metal band, 300 watts. 100 tubed.
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#18
1 watt. in reality it really matters the types of venues that your playing at. if your playing in places with a PA you could even use no amp, otherwise, look at these other intelligent posts to get your answer.
#19
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
It's not that crazy. I have a very average drummer, volume-wise and a 100 watt amp. I usually have to have it at around 9. With his guitarist brother I was struggling to be heard on full.

tell his guitarist brother to turn his guitar down, if ur struggling to be heard get the others to turn down to your volume, otherwise it shows that you guys arent working together.
#20
Quote by jb_reborn
tell his guitarist brother to turn his guitar down, if ur struggling to be heard get the others to turn down to your volume, otherwise it shows that you guys arent working together.

How do you propose he turns down a drummer?
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#21
^Not only that, the guitarist was only turned up loud enough to have the drummer hear him. The fact is 100 watts is just a struggle to use. It's much more comfortable with 200-300. With that you can mostly handle what you need to, if only at a minimum.
#22
Quote by indie-bassist
How do you propose he turns down a drummer?


Haven't you found out yet? All drummers have volume knobs on their necks!!!!

Seriously, if you can't be heard with a decent sized amp, your guitarist is playing too loud and you may go and hit him with the nearest dense object (maybe your drummer???)
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#23
Quote by indie-bassist
How do you propose he turns down a drummer?


By hitting the Drums softer, getting thinner sticks, shove him behind one of those sound barrier things?

There are many ways to turn down drummers, but they more to do with technique and equipment than any volume controls.
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#25
Quote by ChemicalFire
By hitting the Drums softer, getting thinner sticks, shove him behind one of those sound barrier things?

There are many ways to turn down drummers, but they more to do with technique and equipment than any volume controls.

Thing is, how hard they hit the drums is mostly dependent on their technique, stick size is their personal preference and sound barriers are just expensive .
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#26
Quote by indie-bassist
Thing is, how hard they hit the drums is mostly dependent on their technique, stick size is their personal preference and sound barriers are just expensive .


Quote by ChemicalFire
By hitting the Drums softer, getting thinner sticks, shove him behind one of those sound barrier things?

There are many ways to turn down drummers, but they more to do with technique and equipment than any volume controls.



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#27
Quote by ChemicalFire
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I really need to read the whole of the post next time before I reply. I swear that bit wasn't there when I first read it .
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#28
could get him electric drumkits that does actually have volume knobs on them. :P
or practice pads, they work well, you can get special practice sticks that reduces the volume as well. if he cant control his volume when he play, that shows hes not really druming more like banging needlessly.
#29
After playing with an aggressive drummer and a really good jazz drummer, my feeling is that without a PA, 100 - 150 W is not going to cut it. Frankly, my next amp won't be anything less than 200 - 250 W.

Yes, your drummer could play with brushes or use practice pads, but that's not always practical for all situations. I'd rather adjust up to reasonable wattage than have my drummer curtail his playing style drastically. John Bonham was loud, but I'd hardly call his style banging needlessly; my drummer is much the same.
#31
Okay, now you're actually putting him down, which isn't cool. He's actually very talented and can control his sound quite well. He is extremely restrained and tasteful when drumming. He also knows that there are times when you must play loud. You have to remember that drums single handedly control the volume flow of the band. He realizes, unlike you apparently, that there are times when you have to get loud to complement the song properly. Dynamics are one of the best ways to make something interesting and loudness is a dynamic. Some songs need to be loud to really be effective. Apparently not though. Apparently he needs to always play quietly and if he tries to implement a dynamic he should buy thinner sticks (which are about feel, not volume) or brushes (which are about sound as much, if not more, than volume). No wait, he doesn't need to sacrifice feel he can just buy a whole new ****ing drumkit. Brilliant, just brilliant.
#32
to Bales. Great answer. And by the way, as I've mentioned before, Bales, your drummer is really good. People should check out the recordings on your profile to see what I mean.

As I said as well--playing soft is not always practical, as is using brushes or practice pads. We tried the practice pad route btw, my husband has a full drum set in practice pad format (including rubber cymbals, which I find bizarre). It sounded awful.

The thing is that if you are going to play with a drummer with an acoustic drum set, you need decent wattage. That way everyone is happy--the drummer can hear you (which is vital) and there's enough head room to make everyone sonically equal in all situations.
#33
calm down dude. the point is that if you cant be heard in practice with a 100watt amp soemthing is not right.
#35
Quote by jb_reborn
calm down dude. the point is that if you cant be heard in practice with a 100watt amp soemthing is not right.

Hardly.

The perceived volume of the amp is also dependent on variables such as speaker size and surroundings.
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