#1
ok so i play guitar, drums, piano, and i can play bass (i just dont have a bass).
and im looking into starting the cello.
anyone here play it?
and what are the differences between learning guitar and cello?
i know it is tuned in fifths and not fourths like guitar but what else is different?
thanks
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#2
Katie, what was that big thing you were playing earlier?

A Cello

Well, this is a bass guitar, turn it on its side, and CELLO, you've got a bass!
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#3
the bow technique is very difficult to learn.
and since the cello is fretless you have to be EXACTLY in the right position for the note to sound right.

I learned this very quickly when I started to learn upright bass.
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#5
Quote by LetTheBassPlay
the bow technique is very difficult to learn.
and since the cello is fretless you have to be EXACTLY in the right position for the note to sound right.

yeah the whole fretless thing i know is going to be REEEAlly hard to learn.
what "fret" (or note) does the neck connect to the body?
is it like an octave? or more like 15 "frets"
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#6
Violin..sorry

but cello is awesome
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#7
Quote by CullenT
Katie, what was that big thing you were playing earlier?

A Cello

Well, this is a bass guitar, turn it on its side, and CELLO, you've got a bass!


The only useful fact I got from School of Rock is that MTV sucks.

Anyway ... I don't play cello but I do play upright bass which is close. The way it's played has some small similarities to electric bass but only small, the tuning's the same but that doesn't apply to cello. So ... there's little similarities between guitar and cello but if your non-dominant hand's fingers are made of iron from playing guitar then it will help.
Last edited by pwrmax at Jul 15, 2008,
#8
Used to play it. I quit because i learned guitar and it was 10X better.
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#9
Quote by musicTHEORYnerd
yeah the whole fretless thing i know is going to be REEEAlly hard to learn.
what "fret" (or note) does the neck connect to the body?
is it like an octave? or more like 15 "frets"


There's no specific note. The note could vary from string to string. On one string, it could be the 11th "fret", on one it could be the 9th "fret"

it wont be too difficult to learn because the neck isnt as big, but its tough. You'll gain muscle memory fast. My suggestion is to get your bow technique down so that you can watch your fingers to gain the muscle memory.
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#10
I play viola, which is closer to cello than the upright bass actually, as it's tuned an octave (two?) higher. But yes, this is definitely something you want to learn with an actual teacher, because investing in a cello is srs business. Mostly cause cellos cost a crap load.
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#11
Quote by Cutmyself
I play viola, which is closer to cello than the upright bass actually, as it's tuned an octave (two?) higher.


The tuning of a cello is the same as viola (-1 octave) but the bowing technique is closer to bass as well as the way you place your other hand. I remember asking my orchestra director if it would be easy for me to learn cello and he said that I only need to learn the fingering as the playing technique is close to upright bass.
#12
Quote by Cutmyself
I play viola, which is closer to cello than the upright bass actually, as it's tuned an octave (two?) higher. But yes, this is definitely something you want to learn with an actual teacher, because investing in a cello is srs business. Mostly cause cellos cost a crap load.


This is true, its a bit closer. I think its two octaves, because i'm pretty sure that in octaves it goes
1. violin
2. viola
3. cello
4. bass

I'm not 100% sure on that though, so don't take it as fact.

and yes, get a teacher. I've been learning upright without one because my schedule's so crazy, but i'm going to be getting a teacher soon.
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#13
I've been playing for 4 years.

It's honestly easy for me, I've been playing with an orchestra and nothing has really been challenging for me. Once you get the bow hold down and master through 4th position and 4th position you can play most things that aren't too insane.

Cellos are pretty expensive, bows cost quite a bit too. I'd suggest NOT getting one off Ebay, I didn't really have the best experience with one off there.

If you have any more questions just PM me and I'd be more than happy to answer.
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#14
My guitar teacher is playing in a Klezmar band that is touring up in Canada I think. Klezmar is like Jazz and Middle Eastern combined, it makes for an interesting listen.
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#15
It's going to be very tough to learn the intonation, and staying in tune whilst maintaining good tone through your bow and vibrato. I definitely recommend a teacher.

Don't try to think of it as a translation from the 'frets' of a guitar. It's much different than that, because the fretted fingerboard system of a guitar is an improvised version of the temperament used in cellos and other non-fretted instruments. Actually, you can really play in any temperament... But still, it's better to think of it as starting a whole new system rather than translating your guitar ability, OTHER than basic theory. The only thing that will be different is that it actually does matter if a note is Eb or D#, or some situation similar. They will NOT be the same note.
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#16
how much is one if i want to rent it?
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#17
Quote by musicTHEORYnerd
how much is one if i want to rent it?

I dunno, depends from where and how nice the cello. I never practice, but if I wanted to rent one it's $30 a year from my orchestra program. If you guys have one I'd suggest talking to a conductor about renting a cello, you'd probably get more help from them.
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#18
/inb4woodieallenjokes

i find that renting instruments is really a waste of money (from typical shops, ^$30 sounds like a great deal). you can always sell back the instrument, and as long as you take care of it, there shouldn't be too much of a loss of value.


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#19
Quote by MTVget0FFtheAIR
/inb4woodieallenjokes

i find that renting instruments is really a waste of money (from typical shops, ^$30 sounds like a great deal). you can always sell back the instrument, and as long as you take care of it, there shouldn't be too much of a loss of value.


Uh... Unless it's a fairly expensive instrument made by a notable luthier, a used cello may have decreased in value by 1/4 or more... By my experience, of course.

But still, if you are dedicated, buying would seem the easier route.
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#21
Quote by MTVget0FFtheAIR
and as long as you take care of it, there shouldn't be too much of a loss of value.


A wooden body instrument always gains value as it ages ... unless you're Pete Townshend.
#22
I've been playing for 8 years, and it is NOT something you can just pick up and learn. You have to gain muscle, and muscle memory. You have to learn bowing techniques, you have to learn where each note is. You have to learn positions etc. etc.

No one can EVER say they have mastered the cello, because it is IMPOSSIBLE. Sure, you can be the best in the world, but you can not master it, there is always ways to become better.

It should take you at least half a year to at least learn the stuff, and be able to play some easy stuff.


BTW To the guy who said that he has been playing for 4 years and thinks its easy.....

You may find it easy, but in reality you are most likely getting ****ty tone, you are playing out of tune, and you do not have the right technique. Nothing personal, its just not gonna be easy.

Also, I hope you know that there are more than 4 positions.....ever heard of thumb position....
#23
Some quick cello info: tuned in 5ths, so low to high is G D A E. The bowing is very tricky and getting the notes can be frustrating if you are a perfectionist like me. Also doing vibrato is the most annoying thing ever and I believe you are supposed to do it lots and lots.