#1
Hey. So I'm entering my junior year in high school and I'm thinking about what I want to prepare for my audition. As cliche as it is I'm into vaughn, hendrix, and the blues. I was thinking of maybe doing a transcription of hendrix with a kick ass solo because I feel that it's full of expression (dynamics, tempo, etc.)...but I don't want to come in and play a piece they've heard 100 times over. any suggestions?
#2
do the intro to when i come around by green day
lol i have no idea
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#6
thanks...? And if it helps. I'm confident in my music reading and my ear for the other parts of the audition. The thing is that I've heard it's stupid to come in there and audition with jazz if jazz isn't your thing. I talked to a guy that went there and he said to play in the style that you like. But, as far as jazz goes I'm okay...but I'm self taught at finger picking so I dunno how that'll play out.
Last edited by tin_tin at Jul 15, 2008,
#8
Quote by tin_tin
thanks...? And if it helps. I'm confident in my music reading and my ear for the other parts of the audition.

Yes, that will help tons; a good ear and good sight reading ability (specifically the latter) will set you far ahead of so many guitarists it's amazing.

For jazz, a nice chord-melody piece never fails if you do it right. Again, what's your experience with jazz?
#9
Quote by tin_tin
Hey. So I'm entering my junior year in high school and I'm thinking about what I want to prepare for my audition. As cliche as it is I'm into vaughn, hendrix, and the blues. I was thinking of maybe doing a transcription of hendrix with a kick ass solo because I feel that it's full of expression (dynamics, tempo, etc.)...but I don't want to come in and play a piece they've heard 100 times over. any suggestions?
As unorthodox as it sounds, I do not believe contempory styles of music shall help you in your auditions.

When such auditioners say "two styles of conflicting musics," they usually mean a challenging jazz song (probably in the chord/melody style) and a challenging classical song (a gentlewomen I previously knew stated she played a bach song in her audition).

Depending on which musical conservatory you plan to attend, you may need to look into advance improvisation (which is a scot above pentatonic wankery), sight reading, aural dictation or even advanced composition.

Might I ask, which section of berklee are you attending? I have heard that they have both a classical and jazz section.
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#10
I am hardly predisposed to provide informed advice on how to get into Berklee (being 16), but am entertaining similar ambitions! If/when I audition I will be aiming to distinguish myself with perhaps a more unorthodox genre of music (i.e. not blues rock). I would suggest something technically challenging within the field of instrumental music, for instance jazz. You could try transcribing something by John Coltrane or John Mclaughlin to really set yourself apart.
#11
IMO, it is so dumb that Classical and Jazz are the standards.


Yes, they are hard forms of music but there are also other forms that are just as technical.
#12
Quote by Mahavishnu Fan
I am hardly predisposed to provide informed advice on how to get into Berklee (being 16), but am entertaining similar ambitions! If/when I audition I will be aiming to distinguish myself with perhaps a more unorthodox genre of music (i.e. not blues rock). I would suggest something technically challenging within the field of instrumental music, for instance jazz. You could try transcribing something by John Coltrane or John Mclaughlin to really set yourself apart.
You sir, are a well civilised gentlemen. May our manners and our brotherhood cleanse MT. Well played.

Yes, they are hard forms of music but there are also other forms that are just as technical.
Good sir, you may be right. But the combination of technicallity and composition is uncanny in comparison to other genres. Sure metal may be written well, but it is not as challenging as the jazz or classical diciplines.

Regardless, the jazz and classical translate rather well to all other styles of musics. And each is an extensive dicipline to master, as opposed to contemporary genres.
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#13
I know little about music education, but I remember hearing that Berklee is the only (or one of a few) Universities in the US that accept someone not majoring in Jazz or Classical. Does anyone else know anything about this?
#14
Quote by Mahavishnu Fan
I am hardly predisposed to provide informed advice on how to get into Berklee (being 16), but am entertaining similar ambitions! If/when I audition I will be aiming to distinguish myself with perhaps a more unorthodox genre of music (i.e. not blues rock). I would suggest something technically challenging within the field of instrumental music, for instance jazz. You could try transcribing something by John Coltrane or John Mclaughlin to really set yourself apart.



Wow...do you talk like that or just type it? Thats just ridiculous.
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#15
berklee was my plan, until i looked at how much it costs!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

both of my parents combined do not make enough money in a year to send me to berklee, even if they spent on NOTHING else

so McGill it is
BE HAPPY

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#16
transcribing coltrane sounds okay... thanks. And as for the money I'll be knee deep in loans if I make it in. If I'm actually going to do jazz what are some wicked hard peices to learn? I don't really listen to jazz so I don't know what would be an impressive piece.
Last edited by tin_tin at Jul 16, 2008,
#17
Quote by demonofthenight
You sir, are a well civilised gentlemen. May our manners and our brotherhood cleanse MT. Well played.
Good sir, you may be right. But the combination of technicallity and composition is uncanny in comparison to other genres. Sure metal may be written well, but it is not as challenging as the jazz or classical diciplines.

Regardless, the jazz and classical translate rather well to all other styles of musics. And each is an extensive dicipline to master, as opposed to contemporary genres.



I have to disagree and BTW, a genre of music would take hundreds of years to master because every single musician learns something new wheather they notice it or not every day.IMHO, a genre isn't really one form but hundreds/thousands because a genre evolves into something new and creates other new offsprings of itself.

example: Blues to Rock to Punk to Metal to but there is more genres that contributed to this but I don't want to get extremely detailed

You might think that someone mastered a genre but they haven't... most genres of music took hundreds/thousands of years to develop into what it is today and it is probably going to grow even more.


No one can compress hundreds/thousands of years of development into a few years.In no way am I attacking you just voicing my opinion.
Last edited by Graveworm at Jul 16, 2008,
#18
Quote by Graveworm
I have to disagree and BTW, a genre of music would take hundreds of years to master because every single musician learns something new wheather they notice it or not every day.IMHO, a genre isn't really one form but hundreds/thousands because a genre evolves into something new and creates other new offsprings of itself.

example: Blues to Rock to Punk to Metal to but there is more genres that contributed to this but I don't want to get extremely detailed

You might think that someone mastered a genre but they haven't... most genres of music took hundreds/thousands of years to develop into what it is today and it is probably going to grow even more.


No one can compress hundreds/thousands of years of development into a few years.In no way am I attacking you just voicing my opinion.


What he means is that jazz and classical conventions are incredibly complex, which can't be said about all genres. Jazz in particular requires both extreme technical proficiency and a deep understanding of music theory.

Wow...do you talk like that or just type it? Thats just ridiculous.


Apparently having a vocabulary extending beyond l33t sp3ak is "ridiculous".
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#19
Good point. And by the way the berklee website says, "Do not choose a piece or a style of music you think the audition team wants to hear. Rather, select a piece that puts your 'best foot forward' and highlights what you feel represents your best playing. Ultimately, the audition is a discovery process and we want to find out what you do well." .....any thoughts. I can play jazz and I appreciate that style and wouldn't mind learning it, but I'd rather go more towards some vaughn.
#20
Quote by Archeo Avis
What he means is that jazz and classical conventions are incredibly complex, which can't be said about all genres. Jazz in particular requires both extreme technical proficiency and a deep understanding of music theory.



Apparently having a vocabulary extending beyond l33t sp3ak is "ridiculous".



oh.
#21
^theres some bluesy jazz songs that you will like and will impress the judges. I'd suggest some, but I'm brain fried at the moment.

Quote by Archeo Avis
What he means is that jazz and classical conventions are incredibly complex, which can't be said about all genres. Jazz in particular requires both extreme technical proficiency and a deep understanding of music theory.
Actually, it's sort of hard to argue if one is more complex than the other (I've been sitting here for 20 minutes deleting and retyping my post).

Jazz has these massively complex progressions and improvising has come so far in jazz. But classical also has pretty complex progressions and classical has counterpoint. But than again counterpoint can be used in a rock/metal setting (think of the riffs as one voice, vocals as another and basslines as another again) and some pop songs are actually jazz based and use jazz like progressions (dont ask me to name them, I really cant be ****ed).

Classical has been evolving constantly and consistently for the past 600 years, but jazz is actually influenced by classical music, to a degree. Then again, if we're going to argue about which has been around longer, indian classical music is what, 2000 years old?
As opposed to contemporary pop music which has been degressing technically and in its conventions, as, truth be told, the public dont seek out complex music (although I wouldnt be suprised if more people liked a good jazz song than a good pop song).

Any ideas? Disagreements?

And seeing as the T/S's question has been pretty much answered, anyone mind if we steer this thread to a classical Vs Jazz Vs Contemporary discussion?
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#22
^As for the classical vs jazz vs other music being taught... It's pretty straightforward imo.

Classical, perhaps the most straightforward of them all. Classical, for aspiring classical musicians, just needs to be taught. It's so different from most contemporary music (pop, etc) that students just wouldn't get to counterpoint and other mostly classical music specific stuff otherwise. And before someone starts with this, I'm using "classical music" as a collection of all the eras, not just classical era.

Jazz is being taught because it's a means to an end, not an end in itself. Jazz incorporates pretty much everything in use in pretty much every other genre (aside from mainly classical, and the necessary exceptions). Basically, if you've studied jazz, you can do it all, which can't be said for a school teaching most other genres.
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#23
Do NOT try to play a jazz piece or classical piece if you do not plan on majoring in something jazz related such as jazz performance or jazz composition. Berklee is a major school for Jazz and you will be up against kids from all over the world who have played jazz all their lives, and the judges will be able to tell if you do not have a sufficient understanding of jazz which would be extremely hard to acquire in less than 2 years. You can get into the school if you play blues rock piece, just play whatever you play best and whatever style you would want to play the most if you are accepted there. Berklee does accept a lot of students compared to many schools who only accept a handful of students so don't worry about it too much. Your biggest concern should be paying the ridiculously high tuition. Also, you should look at some other schools that have music programs because you can't put all your cards on getting into Berklee.
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#24
Quote by tin_tin
Hey. So I'm entering my junior year in high school and I'm thinking about what I want to prepare for my audition. As cliche as it is I'm into vaughn, hendrix, and the blues. I was thinking of maybe doing a transcription of hendrix with a kick ass solo because I feel that it's full of expression (dynamics, tempo, etc.)...but I don't want to come in and play a piece they've heard 100 times over. any suggestions?

pla y some behemoth
#25
I know the TS' question has already been answered but in addition to the prepared piece don't forget you have to sight read, read a chord chart, know some scales/chords, they test your ear (plays something on piano, you play back), and you have a personal interview.
#26
I just agree that you can't compare the two (jazz and classical). They each have their own strengths and weaknesses.