#2
This should probably be in Musician Talk. A lot of the people there know what they're talking about.
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Last edited by zappp : Today at 4:20 PM. Reason: Suck on my balls, UG
#4
E min pentatonic on the 12 fret of the high e string and climb up or down the minor pentatonic scale
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#5
Regardless of the position of the pentatonic scale that you would play, you'd just play an Em pentatonic scale wherever you want if that's what you're going for. Since a minor pentatonic is built up 1 b3 4 5 b7, you could find the notes E G A B D anywhere on the neck and play them. A common pattern is this:

e-------------------------------------------12-15--
B----------------------------------12-15-----------
G-------------------------12-14--------------------
D-----------------12-14----------------------------
A---------12-14------------------------------------
E-12-15--------------------------------------------


A Bm pentatonic will also work well, since that consists of the notes B D E F# A, all of which occur in the E natural minor scale; the F# isn't as consonant as the notes of the E minor pentatonic scale but will still sound good. Move the position I gave above down 5 frets to get to B minor pentatonic.
#6
Quote by O00Coolzero00O
E min pentatonic on the 12 fret of the high e string and climb up or down the minor pentatonic scale


It can work anywhere on the neck.
#7
ok thank you.
actually i have a huge favor to ask of someone, could someone post the pentatonic positions for ABCDEF and G?
It would be greatly appreciated, or just to show my a site/thread that tells me this.
#8
Quote by metulkult
ok thank you.
actually i have a huge favor to ask of someone, could someone post the pentatonic positions for ABCDEF and G?
It would be greatly appreciated, or just to show my a site/thread that tells me this.


http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/

That site helped me loads with scales and positions.
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Last edited by zappp : Today at 4:20 PM. Reason: Suck on my balls, UG
#9
Quote by metulkult
ok thank you.
actually i have a huge favor to ask of someone, could someone post the pentatonic positions for ABCDEF and G?
It would be greatly appreciated, or just to show my a site/thread that tells me this.

All you have to do is move the root of the position I gave you. Learn how to construct the pentatonic scales (1 2 3 5 6 for major, 1 b3 4 5 b7 for minor) and you'll save yourself a world of trouble and improve your overall understanding of the guitar and music in general.
#10
Quote by :-D
All you have to do is move the root of the position I gave you. Learn how to construct the pentatonic scales (P1 M2 M3 P5 M6 for major, P1 m3 P4 P5 m7 for minor) and you'll save yourself a world of trouble and improve your overall understanding of the guitar and music in general.


Fixed.

Not trying to be an arse, but it's usually considered incorrect to define the qualities of intervals with flats. Not that big of a deal... but it can get really confusing if you label it like that. Especially for someone who's just learning.

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#11
Quote by Checker
Fixed.

Not trying to be an arse, but it's usually considered incorrect to define the qualities of intervals with flats. Not that big of a deal... but it can get really confusing if you label it like that. Especially for someone who's just learning.

No, actually it's not incorrect at all. It's conventional to write out the scale formulas as they relate to the intervals that comprise the major scale, which is what I gave. I was not defining intervals, I was defining scale degrees.
Last edited by :-D at Jul 16, 2008,
#12
Quote by :-D
No, actually it's not incorrect at all. It's conventional to write out the scale formulas as they relate to the intervals that comprise the major scale, which is what I gave. I was not defining intervals, I was defining scale degrees.


Ah. I see. You never said that it was in conjunction with the Major Scale in your post.
Guess that's what threw me off. I just didn't want the guy to learn the qualities of the degrees wrong. (IE: the Major Scale consists of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and the Natural Minor consists of 1, 2, b3, 4, 5, b6, b7, 8 when they are correctly written to consist of P1, M2, M3, P4, P5, M6, M7, P8 for the Major Scale and P1, M2, m3, P4, P5, m6, m7, P8 for the Natural Minor.)

We try to stray from calling an undefined note(such as a scale degree or interval) "flat" because that leaves too much room for interpretation and error.
Like in your example, the E Major Pent. consists of E, F#, G#, B, and C#.
The 1, 2, 3 ,5, and 6.
Now, if the Minor Pent is 1, b3, 4, 5, b7, people could easily mistake it for E, Gb, A, B, Db when it is in fact E, G, A, B, D.

Basically... "flat" doesn't always equal "lowered" which is why we generally just use the qualities to describe scale degrees or intervals.(IE: m6, as opposed to flat 6)

Did I make any sense? I'm not really a words smith.

And I hope I'm not offending you Sir Smiles. I just wanted to relay what I'd learned from my theory teachers and see how it holds up. This is just what I've been taught from a teaching point of view.
You seem to be more educated on this than me, so please feel free to correct anything I have wrong. Theory's always fun to talk about.(Even in an unrelated/ hijacked thread that's in the wrong section.)

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Last edited by Checker at Jul 16, 2008,
#13
im sorry, but the whole 1,2,3,4 P1 M4 thing makes no sense to me at all. im only 14.
#14
Quote by metulkult
im sorry, but the whole 1,2,3,4 P1 M4 thing makes no sense to me at all. im only 14.


Hey, I was in an AP Theory class when I was 14. Two years ago. It was the best class ever.

Anyway, the numbers refer to the degrees (or notes)of the scale. The M(Major), m(Minor), and P(Perfect) describe the qualities of those notes. (There are also Augmented and Diminished qualities.)

Take an E for example. The Major 6th(M6) of an E is C#. The Minor 6th of an E is a C.

Let me give you a little chart.
m2 = 1 half step
M2 = 2 half steps
m3 = 3 half steps
M3 = 4 half steps
P4 = 5 half steps
Aug4/Dim5 = 6 half steps
P5 = 7 half steps
m6 = 8 half steps
M6 = 9 half steps
m7 = 10 half steps
M7 = 11 half steps
P8 = 12 half steps(Octave above starting pitch)

So considering a Minor Pentatonic scale = P1, m3, P4, P5, m7
We can easily find out the notes in it. P1 is the starting pitch. We'll say it's A.
So A(P1) plus a m3, a P4, a P5, and a m7 gives us our scale.

Then, our chart says a m3 is 3 half steps above any given pitch. Therefore a m3 above A is(1 step = A#, 2 steps = B) C. Doing the same thing shows us that the P4 of our starting pitch is D, The P5 is E, and the m7 is G.

So A Minor Pentatonic consists of A(P1), C(m3), D(P4), E(P5), and G(m7).

Does that help you understand how scale degrees/ intervals work?

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Last edited by Checker at Jul 16, 2008,
#15
*moved*
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#16
Quote by Checker
Hey, I was in an AP Theory class when I was 14. Two years ago. It was the best class ever.

Anyway, the numbers refer to the degrees (or notes)of the scale. The M(Major), m(Minor), and P(Perfect) describe the qualities of those notes. (There are also Augmented and Diminished qualities.)

Take an E for example. The Major 6th(M6) of an E is C#. The Minor 6th of an E is a C.

Let me give you a little chart.
m2 = 1 half step
M2 = 2 half steps
m3 = 3 half steps
M3 = 4 half steps
P4 = 5 half steps
Aug4/Dim5 = 6 half steps
P5 = 7 half steps
m6 = 8 half steps
M6 = 9 half steps
m7 = 10 half steps
M7 = 11 half steps
P8 = 12 half steps(Octave above starting pitch)

So considering a Minor Pentatonic scale = P1, m3, P4, P5, m7
We can easily find out the notes in it. P1 is the starting pitch. We'll say it's A.
So A(P1) plus a m3, a P4, a P5, and a m7 gives us our scale.

Then, our chart says a m3 is 3 half steps above any given pitch. Therefore a m3 above A is(1 step = A#, 2 steps = B) C. Doing the same thing shows us that the P4 of are starting pitch is D, The P5 is E, and the m7 is G.

So A Minor Pentatonic consists of A(P1), C(m3), D(P4), E(P5), and G(m7).

Does that help you understand how scale degrees/ intervals work?


i dont mean to hi-jack a thread here, but this post just made me connect 3 things that ive tried to understand about theory into actual usable sense, thanks for that post

*goes back to lurking*
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#17
Quote by Thegian
i dont mean to hi-jack a thread here, but this post just made me connect 3 things that ive tried to understand about theory into actual usable sense, thanks for that post

*goes back to lurking*


Hey! I did something useful!

And this thread was hijacked like 8 posts ago, so I wouldn't worry about it.

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#19
you can use any position Em Pentatonic scale as well as some of the other suggested scales above.


scales are NOT positions. they are notes. and intervals.
#21
There are 5 pentatonic shapes. Learn them.

This is minor pentatonic shape 1


Quote by :-D
e-------------------------------------------12-15--
B----------------------------------12-15-----------
G-------------------------12-14--------------------
D-----------------12-14----------------------------
A---------12-14------------------------------------
E-12-15--------------------------------------------


Shapes 2,3,4 and 5 have the same notes. Just in a different order.
Last edited by mdc at Jul 16, 2008,
#22
Quote by mdc
There are 5 pentatonic shapes. Learn them.

This is minor pentatonic shape 1


Shapes 2,3,4 and 5 have the same notes. Just in a different order.



affirmative. shapes are useful when you begin so that you have a visual point of reference, but as you progress it is good to know why those shapes exist (i.e. the intervals contained within the scale). once you have those down, practice startin them on different strings but the same note (you will notice that all the shapes are kind of contained within each other at different points on the fretboard)