#1
I've been looking at guitar reviews for quite a while now.. Actually since I desperately wanted to play guitar. I'm looking for a guitar (preferably Ibanez) which does great distortion, but which also plays good clean sounds. The sound I'm actually looking for is that of Opeth's. I know Mikael uses a PRS Custom 24, but my budget is fairly limited (400$ for my first guitar +- some $$$). From what I could spot, the RG321MH, RGR321EX and RG370DX models from Ibanez have fairly good reviews, but I'm asking for professional help. I can't figure out which one to buy!!! I really want to learn how to play, so take into consideration that it has to suit a complete novice. I would like the guitar to stay in tune for a long time, I don't know if I'm gonna use a whammy-bar from the start..also the guitar has to be easy to play. I have an acoustic guitar from '73...but it's in a VERY DEPLORABLE STATE..also 18 frets and strangely curved btrings, wooden bridge....I can't learn on this. Also, can you please indicate a good 10-15-maybe 20W amp which I could use with the guitar? This is serious bussiness guys,please help me out.I can't stand looking at another review website. There are always ones who have major problems with their guitars,which makes my choice even harder.
Close to begging for good advice,please.

Ovidiu
#3
Dude, go check out a Schecter. The "Gryphon" runs about $300.00 at Guitar Center, it's a great all around guitar - distortion, clean, effects - whatever. I would pair this up with a Line 6 Spider III amp, that will run you $75 - $100 bucks. It has on board effects and GREAT distortion. There you go - nice set up for $400.00
#4
For your first guitar, I'd go for one with a hardtail (=non-tremolo) bridge.

Some of the Ibanez guitars you listed have a double locking trem, which can be quite tricky to work with if your a beginner. A hardtail bridge will make things like tuning a lot easier.

Check out the RG321; it should be within budget and I find the necks on these RGs to very comfortable. It's all personal taste though, so try as much as you can.

If there is a guitar store near you, try out as much within your budget as possible, even brands or models you wouldn't normally consider. Just keep in mind that if your looking for a nice distortion, a bridge humbucker is a good thing to have.

By the way, if you can't really play yet, see if you can find someone who can to help you out a little when trying them out. Make sure you play around with it too, though, as it's going to be your guitar, not theirs.


As for the amp, the Roland Cubes (preferably the MicroCube or a Cube 30) are a good bet. Personally I prefer them to other amps in the same price range, like the Marshall MG and the Line 6 Spiders.
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Last edited by Bonsaischaap at Jul 16, 2008,
#5
Hmm.. the Jackson JS30RR. A review website gives it all-thumbs-up. Another one sends it to the pits of hell (in a bad way). It's get more frustrating by the minute... Also,is there a difference between all those JS30 models except from looks? All have exactly the same price.
#6
I can only speak from my experience, I've no knoweldge of the above guitars but the Yamaha Pacifica 112v rocks, very very and I mean very easy to play. Great sound and great build quality. If it were stolen/lost I'd get another.
Yamaha Pacifica 112
Tanglewood TW15NS
Line6 Spider III 15w (playing into the MP3/CD input = bypass all the Spider processing)
Boss DD-3
DigiTech RP500

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#7
Quote by Bonsaischaap
For your first guitar, I'd go for one with a hardtail (=non-tremolo) bridge.

Some of the Ibanez guitars you listed have a double locking trem, which can be quite tricky to work with if your a beginner. A hardtail bridge will make things like tuning a lot easier.

Check out the RG321; it should be within budget and I find the necks on these RGs to very comfortable. It's all personal taste though, so try as much as you can.

If there is a guitar store near you, try out as much within your budget as possible, even brands or models you wouldn't normally consider. Just keep in mind that if your looking for a nice distortion, a bridge humbucker is a good thing to have.

By the way, if you can't really play yet, see if you can find someone who can to help you out a little when trying them out. Make sure you play around with it too, though, as it's going to be your guitar, not theirs.


As for the amp, the Roland Cubes (preferably the MicroCube or a Cube 30) are a good bet. Personally I prefer them to other amps in the same price range, like the Marshall MG and the Line 6 Spiders.


agreed. avoid anything with a floyd-style trem at your pricerange, as the trem is liable to crap out on you.

excellent point about the bridge humbucker- it's a necessity for heavier sounds if you ask me.

i agree with avoiding locking trems; however, something like a yamaha pacifica 112 would be alright, since you can convert its trem to a hardtail without too much bother (if you don't use the trem).

microcube or cube 30 are great too.

i'd also avoid anything too pointy at that budget; $400 isn't very much, and you want as much of that money as possible to be going to the quality of wood in the guitar, the hardware, the pickups and electronics, not towards fancy shapes.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

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#8
Quote by Dave_Mc
agreed. avoid anything with a floyd-style trem at your pricerange, as the trem is liable to crap out on you.

excellent point about the bridge humbucker- it's a necessity for heavier sounds if you ask me.

i agree with avoiding locking trems; however, something like a yamaha pacifica 112 would be alright, since you can convert its trem to a hardtail without too much bother (if you don't use the trem).

microcube or cube 30 are great too.

i'd also avoid anything too pointy at that budget; $400 isn't very much, and you want as much of that money as possible to be going to the quality of wood in the guitar, the hardware, the pickups and electronics, not towards fancy shapes.





And the Pacifica is indeed an excellent instrument.
You've read it, you can't un-read it!
#9
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#10
if you want quality for cheap. but a schecter. quality=shecter no matter wat