#1
well im going to youth group tonight and know a couple of modes (ionian, dorian, phrygan) and the minor and major pentatonic scales.

Which of those would i use when soloing over a G,C,D chord progression?
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#4
G C D is a I IV V progression in the key of G major. Use the G major scale.
#5
Quote by Eirien
G C D is a I IV V progression in the key of G major. Use the G major scale.


+1

no offense to TheShred, but thinking of modes like that would not be appropriate in this case. Its just a basic G major progression...... Use the G major scale.

If you don't know the G Major scale, you could use E minor pentatonic to get by. It is related and will sound as G Major pentatonic because of this relationship. At this point you don't need to know why..... just that it works.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jul 16, 2008,
#6
Those chords spell out G major too clearly for anything else to work. Any of the relative modes(A dorian, B phrygian, etc) will yield the same notes, and played over a G major progression, will just sound like plain old G major. If you want some tonal variety, play some Bb's(minor third, blue note in a major key). Bend to or from it for a bluesy type of sound. G major and G major pentatonic are both great.
#7
Quote by grampastumpy
Those chords spell out G major too clearly for anything else to work. Any of the relative modes(A dorian, B phrygian, etc) will yield the same notes, and played over a G major progression, will just sound like plain old G major. If you want some tonal variety, play some Bb's(minor third, blue note in a major key). Bend to or from it for a bluesy type of sound. G major and G major pentatonic are both great.


Just a quick point and I don't mean to offend at all but............

in my experience, someone that doesn't know what scale to use over a standard I IV V progression, probably wont understand the concept of using the "blue" note. Also its not entirely appropriate here as its most commonly used over dominant 7th chords creating a #9 sound.
my suggestion for a person in the TS's position is to keep it as simple as possible so you can focus on making music.
shred is gaudy music
#8
Quote by GuitarMunky
Just a quick point and I don't mean to offend at all but............

in my experience, someone that doesn't know what scale to use over a standard I IV V progression, probably wont understand the concept of using the "blue" note. Also its not entirely appropriate here as its most commonly used over dominant 7th chords creating a #9 sound.
my suggestion for a person in the TS's position is to keep it as simple as possible so you can focus on making music.
Not offended at all.

It is fairly appropriate. If I had told him to play a bunch of F's or use the Gm Pentatonic that would be a different story. While you have a point, I think just introducing him to that fairly common tonality isn't too far ahead. The blue note is pretty huge in a lot of rock and IMO belongs right up there with the plain old Pentatonic scales.

But yeah, TS, for now, don't try modes either. It seems as though you're not quite sure about how they're used, so for now just stick to some sort of G major scale. If you're interested, do some reading so you can tell for yourself what key something is in and from there determine what you can use.
#9
Quote by GuitarMunky
+1

no offense to TheShred, but thinking of modes like that would not be appropriate in this case. Its just a basic G major progression...... Use the G major scale.

If you don't know the G Major scale, you could use E minor pentatonic to get by. It is related and will sound as G Major pentatonic because of this relationship. At this point you don't need to know why..... just that it works.


In any case, any of the scales I listed will effectively BE G major over the progression. I was just giving the roots for the modes/pentatonics that he listed. In the case they are more of box shapes, as B phrygian isn't going to sound phrygian over the progression. But in terms of improvising, it can be helpful to think of the phrygian shape if you are comfortable with it, which is why I answered his question how I did.
#11
Quote by TheShred201
GCD:
Of what you listed, you could use:
G Ionian
A Dorian
B Phrygian
G major pentatonic
E Minor Pentatonic
TS, you can consider this true until such time that you really get into theory.