#3
In music theory, each key has it's relative minor, which basically has the same notes in it, A minor would be relative to C major.
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#5
the relation is that they have the same notes but with other tonic note (the first one) and different intervals between every note.

this is because A minor is the minor relatitive of C major. to know the relative minor of a key or scale, just check the note that is 4 half steps below, and thats the relative (C-B-Bb-A).

if you want to know the relative of, for example, G major, go down 4 half steps (G-Gb-F-E) and E minor is the minor relative of G major, and it has the same notes in other order. this applies in any scale, not only in pentatonic. the exceptions are harmonic and melodic minor, where the extra accidentals must be removed first.
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Last edited by ldnovelo at Jul 16, 2008,
#6
Quote by ldnovelo
the relation is that they have the same notes but with other tonic note (the first one) and different intervals between every note.

this is because A minor is the minor relatitive of C major. to know the relative minor of a key or scale, just check the note that is 4 half steps below, and thats the relative (C-B-Bb-A).

if you want to know the relative of, for example, G major, go down 4 half steps (G-Gb-F-E) and E minor is the minor relative of G major, and it has the same notes in other order. this applies in any scale, not only in pentatonic. the exceptions are harmonic and melodic minor, where the extra accidentals must be removed first.
G to E is down 3 half steps. They are "relative' because their notes are the same, they don't have the same notes because they are relative.


Okay TS. As has been said, A minor and C major are relative. That's the only similarity. If you're soloing over a progression in A minor and you come across a Cmaj chord, you won't solo in C major over it, you stick to A minor because that's what the progression is in. It's the same for the opposite (soloing in C and coming across an Am chord).
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#7
They are "relative' because their notes are the same, they don't have the same notes because they are relative.
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#8
Quote by Ænimus Prime
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+1.

I assume that was just worded oddly, I know you know what you're doing, metal.

TS: The basic answer is they have the same notes but are comprised of different intervals and revolve around different tonal centers.
#9
Yep.

C Major scale has the following step pattern W W H W W W H
Starting on C this is C D E F G A B C
The notes in this scale all relate to C since it is the tonic. The relationship between the 1st note C and the 3rd note E for example is a major third. (Four half steps).

A minor scale has the following step pattern W H W W H W W
Starting on A this gives A B C D E F G A.
The notes all relate to the A since it is the tonic. The relationship between the 1st note A and the third note C for example is a minor third. (Three half steps).

Notice the step pattern in A minor could be viewed as the same step pattern as the C Major just starting from a different place.
To illustrate i repeat the major scale step pattern for the major scale over two octaves first showing where the Major Scale fits and then showing where the Natural Minor Scale fits:
W W H W W W H W W H W W W H Major scale
W W H W W W H W W H W W W H minor scale

You can do this at any of the seven points along the step pattern to get a different sound.
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