#1
I need some help figuring out how to determine what chords are in minor scale keys. I looked on a lesson on this site which gave me a pattern on how to determine what chords are in minor keys which looked like this:

1 - major
2 - minor
3 - minor
4 - major
5 - major
6 - minor
7 - diminished

With the numbers representing the scale degrees, such as 3 meaning E in the C major scale. I was wondering if anyone knew a pattern that would work the same way, but with the minor scale. I'm trying to find all the chords that would work with B minor. >.>
#4
sure. also, notice that its the same thing, just starting on the sixth of the major scale.
#5
Ah, that's helpful to know. So I'm assuming that the pattern for 7th chords in minor would be:

min7
min7b5
maj7
min7
min7
maj7
dom7

?
#6
^ Yeah that's right. Just to expand on what everyone else has said;

i 7        min7
ii 7b5     min7b5
III M7     maj7
iv 7       min7
v 7        min7
VI M7      maj7
VII 7      dom7


These are the chords diatonic to the natural minor scale. Often minor keys use V7 and vii°7 from the harmonic minor scale to make resolutions to the i chord stronger

Edit - I'm just wondering, are you supposed to put flat signs before III, VI and VII when writing in a minor key?
#7
Quote by Eirien
nger

Edit - I'm just wondering, are you supposed to put flat signs before III, VI and VII when writing in a minor key?


Not that I know of. I've never seen it written that way in any text books. I think its assumed that by that point you already understand the scale steps of the minor scale and how they relate to the Major scale.
shred is gaudy music
#8
Edit - I'm just wondering, are you supposed to put flat signs before III, VI and VII when writing in a minor key?
I sometimes do that, particularly when comparing the viio and bVII chords as they are on different notes.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#9
Quote by guerito
minor
diminished
major
minor
minor
major
major


Hate to piggy back this guy's thread, but it brought up a question of mine after reading this.

So basically if your in the key of C you could play the chords

A minor
B Dim
C Major
D Minor
E Minor
F Major
G Major

Chords not the notes...I know your supposed to stick to the I IV V pattern or something like that, with the relative minor too, but technically can you play all of them and still remain in the same key of C?
#10
Quote by rossjohnson87
...I know your supposed to stick to the I IV V pattern or something like that, with the relative minor too, but technically can you play all of them and still remain in the same key of C?
Yes to the rest, but "what?" to this.
#11
I know your supposed to stick to the I IV V pattern or something like that, with the relative minor too, but technically can you play all of them and still remain in the same key of C?
Yes all those chords are in the key of C, and nothing says you should stick to I IV V
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#12
Chords not the notes...I know your supposed to stick to the I IV V pattern or something like that, with the relative minor too, but technically can you play all of them and still remain in the same key of C?


All of those chords work within the key signature of C, yes. The reason the I IV V progression is so common is because the resolution of the V chord to the tonic is extremely powerful, and strongly establishes tonality. The danger (if you're trying to establish a tonal center, anyway) of throwing random chords into the mix is that you may disturb the tonic, causing the progression to resolve elsewhere (most likely to A). So while all of the chords work in the key signature, you may not be playing the C major scale, depending on which chords you use.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#13
I'd say:
I minor
ii half-diminished or minor
bIII major or augmented
iv minor (sometimes major?)
V/v Major, sometimes minor
bVI Major
vii0 full diminished

Just remember guys that in minor keys you need to use some out of key chords (mostly the V7 chord and the vii0 chord) to resolve to the i chord. Otherwise your proression may resolve to the III chord, effectively making that progression major, not minor, which isnt necessarily a bad thing (major progressions can sound just as sad, normally sadder IMO, than minor progressions)
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        L.
#14
Theory's tough stuff, not gonna lie, but eh, it has helped my dramatically in the little that I know. Thanks for the help guys, I'm sure I'll have more questions soon enough.