#1
To me, it seems that everything you can learn, is already in the major scale, up and down the neck. The relative minor scale is there, and from what I understand, the modes are there too (or are they?) I don't like the sound of the pentatonic scale at all, but that is in there too. If all the notes of the key are in the major scale, can't i just figure out licks and phrases from that?

Or are the other shapes and such just there to show you what you can DO with the notes already in the scale.

Am I at a complete misunderstanding here? I need some help!

Edit:
Something I left out... It is not like you are playing the scales up and down in improv or song writing, so why does it matter if I know I am using the A minor scale, or the C major. The same notes are there. Right?
Last edited by NemX162 at Jul 16, 2008,
#2
C Minor and A major scales have the same notes, but they have differnt root notes
"Blues is easy to play, but hard to feel."- Jimi Hendrix
#3
if you think everything is in the major scale, listen to yngwie malmsteen - some serious harmonic minor goin' on there.
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#4
Quote by iburnmyfrendz66
if you think everything is in the major scale, listen to yngwie malmsteen - some serious harmonic minor goin' on there.


I don't want to play like Malmsteen, haha. However, I see what you're saying.
#5
Quote by bBreaker
C Minor and A major scales have the same notes, but they have differnt root notes



Yes, but I am not playing the scale from root to octave in a song I make. I will be hitting whatever notes are needed. So why does it matter where the root is?
#6
Or are the other shapes and such just there to show you what you can DO with the notes already in the scale.
Bingo

Everything in the major scale is already contained in the chromatic scale so why learn anything other than the chromatic scale?

A scale is a set of usable notes
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#7
Quote by bBreaker
C Minor and A major scales have the same notes, but they have differnt root notes

C (natural) minor = C D Eb F G Ab Bb C
A major = A B C# D# E F# G# A

Not quite the same notes .

You probably meant C major and A minor, which do contain the same notes.
#8
How do you not like the sound of the pentatonic? There's a million different ways to play it that can sound totally different. I could see if you don't like a certain type of style but not how you don't like the whole scale ever. Do you mean you don't like bluesy sounding licks that are most commonly assosiated with it. You might not recognise it when you hear it everytime beacuse it can be used so many ways. If you don't like pentatonic scale most of Clapton, Allman brothers band, Pink Floyd and countless other classics must not sound good to you which i can't understand.

LOL prime is right just use the chromatic scale that covers it all.
#9
Quote by NemX162
Edit:
Something I left out... It is not like you are playing the scales up and down in improv or song writing, so why does it matter if I know I am using the A minor scale, or the C major. The same notes are there. Right?

*insert facepalm here*


Edit: ^I don't like the pentatonic scale. It's just the major scale minus 2 notes. If I feel like playing something like it, I'll use the major scale with better phrasing.
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#10
Quote by NemX162
Yes, but I am not playing the scale from root to octave in a song I make. I will be hitting whatever notes are needed. So why does it matter where the root is?


Not only the root, but every note in the scale. They all have different scale degrees.
And, you can think of each scale degree as having a different function. That's
why A minor and C major aren't the same despite having the same notes.

That is, if you care about such things. When you play the notes "as needed" you
might be able to judge in advance a bit better as to how it will sound.
#11
Quote by metal4all
^I don't like the pentatonic scale. It's just the major scale minus 2 notes. If I feel like playing something like it, I'll use the major scale with better phrasing.

^ My feelings exactly ^


TS,
You seem to know the similarities between relative scales which is useful.

But knowing the differences between the relative scales is important as is knowing the similarities and differences between parallel scales .

Imagine you come up with a killer riff or great melody using the notes of C Major. You might think - wow this freakin rocks and I just used the C major scale to come up with it.

Then you get your band together and and say hey let's play a jam in the C major scale.
Suddenly your riff sounds crap. Then your drummer will have to say "Hang on Dude, you're like totally playing a riff in A minor man why is everyone like playing in C Major?"
Si