#1
Can anyone tell me if the chords used in rick derringer's "rock and roll hoochie koo" are open chords or power chords please? I'm leaning towards open chords because it seems alot of classic rock favors the use of the open chord rather than power chords. If anyone needs the hear the song, here's a youtube link: video

thanks for the help
#3
i think its power chords, listen to those licks, they sound like theyre further down the neck. But your above statement is def. true with the fact that classic rock tends to prefer open chords
#4
well. I know rick is playing power. Someone else might be doing open, but he's throwing some note in under the chord, and you have to play a powerchord to do it easily.
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#5
Ok, cool. Thanks for the info. BGC, D, Archeo Avis, & Prime, you guys have any input or things you'd like to add? Thanks again.
#6
Quote by rockadoodle
BGC, D, Archeo Avis, & Prime
Hmm...which one doesn't belong? I kid, I kid...

(Oh, snap, I hope either D or Arch isn't American!)


Anyway, there are plenty of members besides the four of us who know what they're talking about, so we don't have to post in every thread. However, that song is definately heavy on the powerchords.
#7
^I'm from the exact same location as you, Sue, including the "fvck yeah".

I hear quite a few power chords in there; I forgot how cool of a song that was, thanks.
#8
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Hmm...which one doesn't belong? I kid, I kid...

(Oh, snap, I hope either D or Arch isn't American!)


Anyway, there are plenty of members besides the four of us who know what they're talking about, so we don't have to post in every thread. However, that song is definately heavy on the powerchords.



mmk. Is there generally any way you can tell whether a chord is a power chord or open? I'm sure the obvious answer is because of the way they sound, but with gain/distortion its hard for my "young" undeveloped ear to distinguish.
#9
Quote by rockadoodle
mmk. Is there generally any way you can tell whether a chord is a power chord or open? I'm sure the obvious answer is because of the way they sound, but with gain/distortion its hard for my "young" undeveloped ear to distinguish.



Well, a power chord isn't a real chord. it's a 5th, and sometimes played with the octave. So a G power chord is a G and D and another G if you want to throw in the octave note.

E-----------------
B----------------
G----------------
D---5------------- G
A---5-------------- D
E---3-------------- G

Where as open is

---3----------- G
---3---------------D
---0---------------G
---0------------ D
---2----------- B
---3-------------- G

There's more to an open chord. That's probably not the music theory way of saying it. But it's how i learned to tell the difference.
It doens't really have the full, bright sound of an open chord. I don't know. It took me a while to learn to distinguish, esp with distortion.
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Last edited by Artemis Entreri at Jul 16, 2008,
#11
I don't want to confuse matters too much, but technically you can have open powerchords too...

For something like rock and roll hoochie-koo, which has been covered countless times, it doesn't really matter all that much. *If* I remember correctly there's allsorts in there anyway There's normal 2/3 string root and 5th powerchords that you can play barred or open, it's entirely up to you. However, I think there's some full A5 shape chords in there, like this...

E|-5-
B|-5-
G|-2-
D|-2-
A|-0-
E|---


that's technically a powerchord, it's nothing but roots and 5ths, just in different octaves.
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#13
Would i be right in saying that wherever 'power' has been written in this thread... it should say 'barre' ?

Like Steve Sparrow said, open chords can be power chords, power chords can have open strings.... so it doesn't really make a lot of sense.
#14
I just had a quick listen to remind myself and the main verse riff isn't really either, technically it's just 4th interval doublestops alternating off the root note although you could think if them as inverted powerchords if it helps, something like this...

E|-----------------------
B|-----------------------
G|---2--2-----5---7----5-
D|---2--2-----5---7----5-
A|-0---------0---0----0--
E|-----------------------


And those bright chords right at the start are "big" powerchords played high up the neck, slide each one down after you hit it...


E|--13------15------17-----
B|--13------15------17-----
G|--10------12------14----
D|--10------12------14-----
A|-------------------------
E|-------------------------
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#15
Quote by branny1982
Would i be right in saying that wherever 'power' has been written in this thread... it should say 'barre' ?

Like Steve Sparrow said, open chords can be power chords, power chords can have open strings.... so it doesn't really make a lot of sense.



No.
---------
---------
----------
---5-----
---5------
---3-------
power

e--3------- G
B--3--------D
G--4--------B
D--5--------G
A--5--------D
E--3--------G
Barre

Throwing that B in, and all three octaves of the G makes it a Barre chord. When you add the B, it makes it a real chord because it has the three notes in it required to make it a chord.


And I think when we're saying open chords, we should be saying first position. But I never really paid attention to that part of naming chords.
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#16
^meh...same difference really, its just the bottom 3 notes of a barre chord, people get way too hung up on the minutiae of describing things when they're all pretty much the same. All you're doing is taking a few notes and putting them together whichever way you want to look at it.
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#17
Quote by steven seagull
^meh...same difference really, its just the bottom 3 notes of a barre chord, people get way too hung up on the minutiae of describing things when they're all pretty much the same. All you're doing is taking a few notes and putting them together whichever way you want to look at it.



hahaha, that's a good way to put it.
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#18
Chords and power dyads (or chords), are very different things, they have very different sounds. A chord is three or more notes, with the third (what the power is lacking) gives it an inherent emotional quality, major chords being happy, minor being sad. Power chords are devoid of emotion, which is why bands that employ them exclusively can be heard as either happy or sad (half of COB's songs make me happy). Where they are played on the neck, whether in first position (open) or barred, doesn't matter.