#1
Hi I'm feeling mood of developping my musical theory scale and could someone put me on the right rails what to do next?

Here's some stuff i knew and I try to get them better and better day by day.
-Arpeggios and how to use them under chords.
-Major and Minor keys (thanks to bandgoodcharlotte )
-Chords, triads, sevenths, minor and major stuff like that.
-Major and major augmented modes better know as harmonic minor mode (I guess),I should learn about minor ascending modes but I really wouldn't use it at all
-Bunch of scales: major, minor, pentatonic major and minor, harmonic minor, diminished whole and half, pentatonic blues minor and major.

I think that is the most, I'll let u know if i forgot to mention something.

Please give useful tips only what to do next
鋼の錬金術師
#2
Do you actually know how all of that stuff works, or do you just know patterns?

Please review the link in my sig to make sure you know all of that material.

And how much do you know about timing, rhythm, and meters?
#3
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Do you actually know how all of that stuff works, or do you just know patterns?

Please review the link in my sig to make sure you know all of that material.

And how much do you know about timing, rhythm, and meters?


I know how that stuff works, how they are constructed, what to do with them, the intervals etc.

I've watched both of the links in your sig today to be sure before asking.

I know something about timing, rhytm and meters. I play in a band so under the drums it's developping really well. Though I could try using more meternome, I've been quite lazy with it
鋼の錬金術師
#5
Quote by hiimwilson2010
how about modes of scales? like phrigian, lydian, ionian, mixolydian and such?


-Major and major augmented modes better know as harmonic minor mode (I guess),I should learn about minor ascending modes but I really wouldn't use it at all

Like I said.
鋼の錬金術師
#8
Quote by bangoodcharlote
What are minor ascending modes?


same as melodic minor modes, I just call them as ascending modes though is rare.

Here are the names of the seven melodic minor modes: 1) Melodic Minor, 2) Dorian b2, 3) Lydian Augmented, 4) Lydian Dominant, 5) Mixolydian b6, 6) Half-Diminished, 7) Altered.

1. The Melodic Minor: 1 2 b3 4 5 6 7 1
In jazz, the m7 chord is most common among minor chords. However, the min Maj 7 chord is also quite commonplace. A min Maj 7 chord has a flat 3rd in it to make it min, but it also has the regular 7th in it, reminiscent of a Maj 7th chord. Recall that the melodic minor mode has a flat third, as well as a regular seventh in it. This makes it a perfect choice for soloing over min Maj 7th chords, in place of a Dorian mode for m7 chords.

2. Dorian b2: 1 b2 b3 4 5 6 b7 1 (a.k.a. Javanese)
The fact that this mode doesn't have a unique name reflects the frequency of it's use. It isn't used very often, but it fits well over sus9b9 chords. Just make sure the b3 is avoided when soloing.

3. Lydian Augmented: 1 2 3 #4 #5 6 7 1 (a.k.a. Super-Lydian)
The Lydian Augmented mode is a lydian scale with a sharpened fifth. It it commonly used over Major + chords.
A Major + chord is a Maj 7th chord with a #5 and #11.

4. Lydian Dominant: 1 2 3 #4 5 6 b7 1 (a.k.a Mixolydian #11, Overtone)
A very common alteration to a Dom 7th chord is adding a #11. And this mode fits perfectly over a 7th #11 chord. If you're looking to add some colour to a regular Dom 7th chord, soloing over it with a Lydian Dominant will work too.

5. Mixolydian b6: 1 2 3 4 5 b6 b7 (a.k.a. Hindu)
This is another very seldomly used scale. It can be used, however, over a Dom b13 chord.

6. Half-Diminished: 1 2 b3 4 b5 b6 b7 (a.k.a Aeolian b5, Locrian (nat)2)
This is a scale that corresponds to the min7b5 chord, a common chord in jazz, and hence, a very useful mode in jazz music.

7. Altered: 1 b2 b3 b4 b5 b6 b7 (a.k.a. Locrian b4, Super-Locrian)
The Altered mode is the result of adding all possible alterations to the Mixolydian Scale. It can be used over an alt 7th chord.
鋼の錬金術師
#9
I can pretty much guarantee you that you've only played very few of those in context just because they're so rare; try to find some good backing tracks for some of those scales, because the modes of the melodic minor scale are great in jazz.

Also, though it may not be what you're looking for, do some hardcore ear training. If you can't listen well, you won't play well in any kind of ensemble setting.
#10
Quote by Punkismygod
same as melodic minor modes, I just call them as ascending modes though is rare.
I know what they are. Please call them by their proper name, "modes of the melodic minor."
#11
Quote by :-D
I can pretty much guarantee you that you've only played very few of those in context just because they're so rare; try to find some good backing tracks for some of those scales, because the modes of the melodic minor scale are great in jazz.

Also, though it may not be what you're looking for, do some hardcore ear training. If you can't listen well, you won't play well in any kind of ensemble setting.


Like I said, I train those things every day to get better and better, but I'm just asking is there anything else left in the tank?

I think I'll try to add the modes of the melodic minor (I actually said it right)

I like to translate lot of songs with my ear or parts of them, I just get lazy somewhere half-way through the song and move on to another, but tanks for the tip I'll keep doing that more
鋼の錬金術師
#12
Harmonic theory and composition are things that are often overlooked. Things like progressions vs. regressions, cadences, chord substitutions, reharmonization, counterpoint etc. They all help with understanding music better and consequently lead to better improvisation and composition.
Si