#4
Beethoven used 128th notes in the first movement of his Pathétique Sonata

Copied from wikipedia
#5
theres no reason to..... which means dragonforce should not exist (oops, let that slip)...... but seriously..... if u wanted to subdivide a 64th note.... i dont see the harm, but ud have to have an insanely odd time signature and ridiculously slow tempo to utilize such a note

so basically...... no
#8
On guitar? No. On other instruments? Yes.

People fail to realize that just because it's a very rapid note doesn't mean it isn't possible. I read somewhere about a song that used a 10XXth note. Furthermore, it could be a rest.

Also keep in mind each instruments physical requirements. Guitar is a very demanding instrument (Physically). Piano, on the other hand, isn't. Think about those insanely fast piano solos. It can get to the point where they're just rolling their hands on the keys. Me and my friend were talking about this earlier today. Piano solos will always be faster than any great guitar solo. It's just how the instrument is.
#9
Haha 128th note rest.
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#10
Quote by VIRUSDETECTED
On guitar? No. On other instruments? Yes.

People fail to realize that just because it's a very rapid note doesn't mean it isn't possible. I read somewhere about a song that used a 10XXth note. Furthermore, it could be a rest.

Also keep in mind each instruments physical requirements. Guitar is a very demanding instrument (Physically). Piano, on the other hand, isn't. Think about those insanely fast piano solos. It can get to the point where they're just rolling their hands on the keys. Me and my friend were talking about this earlier today. Piano solos will always be faster than any great guitar solo. It's just how the instrument is.


Unless I am wrong, Lubomyr Melnyk is the fastest pianist of all time with a total of 19.5 notes per second. Francesco Fareri has done 33 notes per second. With techniques like sweep picking and tapping, the overdriven guitar seems to be the fastest intrument right now IMO.
#11
128th note doesn't mean it is actually fast. 32nd and 64th notes are more common in low tempo songs, 128th notes are probably the same. The solo from "Every Rose Has Its Thorns" has smaller intervals than the solo from "Through the Fire and the Flames," it still doesn't make it faster.

Quote by SuperWeirdoUG
Unless I am wrong, Lubomyr Melnyk is the fastest pianist of all time with a total of 19.5 notes per second. Francesco Fareri has done 33 notes per second. With techniques like sweep picking and tapping, the overdriven guitar seems to be the fastest intrument right now IMO.


I think the fastest consistent guitar player was probably Shawn Lane and he clocked in at 18 notes per second (usually when notes per second are counted the player has to be able to consistently maintain them). Guitar lets you get faster with sort of arm spasming techniques, but the people that use those aren't really controlling them. They aren't really notes if you aren't hitting them in time, it's just making lots of little random noises quickly.
Last edited by Matheau at Jul 17, 2008,
#13
Quote by lpmarshall
if you strum a chord, isn't that technically picking all six notes?

Speed is the measure of distance over time. Playing notes over time is melody. Playing notes at once is harmony. If there is no time, there is no speed. Therefore, chords don't count.
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#14
Quote by Matheau
128th note doesn't mean it is actually fast. 32nd and 64th notes are more common in low tempo songs, 128th notes are probably the same. The solo from "Every Rose Has Its Thorns" has smaller intervals than the solo from "Through the Fire and the Flames," it still doesn't make it faster.


I think the fastest consistent guitar player was probably Shawn Lane and he clocked in at 18 notes per second (usually when notes per second are counted the player has to be able to consistently maintain them). Guitar lets you get faster with sort of arm spasming techniques, but the people that use those aren't really controlling them. They aren't really notes if you aren't hitting them in time, it's just making lots of little random noises quickly.


Guitar virtuosos DO control what they do otherwise it wouldn't sound clean AT ALL. It's not just random notes spilling, it's carefully chosen and practiced runs. And shredders can keep up the 20 notes per second rate by mixing legato and alternate picking (this includes Shawn Lane).
#15
Yeeeees, I don't know what you're talking about with the spasming thing. If shredders had no control then they'd just make random notes and wouldn't be able to play in time to a metronome. Suspension - Francesco Fareri. Look it up on YouTube. Ridiculously fast shred, and IMO bland, boring and tasteless music. However in that song he holds the record for the fastest guitarist alive.

As for 128th notes, I did hear somewhere that Francesco Fareri has used them, but I wouldn't know if it's true or not and if so what song.
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#16
128th notes ... what for?

for christ sake, show me someone playing 128th notes on 120 beats per minute. i dont think the human ear could hear something close to "music"
#17
yes, its called a semihemidemisemiquaver. Just the other week I was studying a double concerto written by bach for two violins where there were massive runs of 128th notes, and 256th notes.

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#18
Quote by Your_Dad
yes, its called a semihemidemisemiquaver. Just the other week I was studying a double concerto written by bach for two violins where there were massive runs of 128th notes, and 256th notes.



zomg, and what tempo? 10bpm or what
#19
baroque music uses very small subdivisions and slow tempos, the reason for doing this is because if you use bigger subdivisions they end up on a beat sometimes and therefore get extra accentuation because that is how musicians think, if you have smaller subdivisions, you get accentuation on the first and third beat just like always, but then all the other little notes are even, it's a completely different sound dynamically
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#20
Quote by metal4all
Speed is the measure of distance over time. Playing notes over time is melody. Playing notes at once is harmony. If there is no time, there is no speed. Therefore, chords don't count.


Maybe he meant an arpeggio?
Or a strummed chord, the low note (if doing downpick) is strummed before the high one, so time is present...


What is the problem with 128th notes? I play them all the time at 250 bpm, so fast people can't even see my arm moving through the guitar, but since I have an acoustic it isn't heard...
#21
Quote by gonzaw
Maybe he meant an arpeggio?
Or a strummed chord, the low note (if doing downpick) is strummed before the high one, so time is present...

He said "strum a chord." You don't play each note individually. You play them all at once and let them ring over each other. They are played harmonically. We're not going to have a bunch of n00bs say they can strum chords at 40nps now are we?
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#22
Quote by Gacel
zomg, and what tempo? 10bpm or what



Well the double concerto was marked as Largo, which is Very Slow, like 40bpm.
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#23
Quote by metal4all
He said "strum a chord." You don't play each note individually. You play them all at once and let them ring over each other. They are played harmonically. We're not going to have a bunch of n00bs say they can strum chords at 40nps now are we?

technically, you do play each note individually. but you let them ring so that they are sounding at the same time to make a harmony. but you do strum from either bottom to top, or top to bottom. unless you slap chords or use your fingers to pluck the strings.

but no it doesnt count when dealing with speed. because in theory chords are usually to be played all at once. thats how they are written unless its an arpeggio. but it usually doesnt work out that way when strumming.
#24
If anyone wants to hear 128th and 256th notes at 120bpm, I just made a few seconds of music on sibelius. It's on my profile called "Flight Of The Crack Bee"

Yep, I'm bored.
#25
Quote by Blind In 1 Ear
technically, you do play each note individually. but you let them ring so that they are sounding at the same time to make a harmony. but you do strum from either bottom to top, or top to bottom. unless you slap chords or use your fingers to pluck the strings.

but no it doesnt count when dealing with speed. because in theory chords are usually to be played all at once. thats how they are written unless its an arpeggio. but it usually doesnt work out that way when strumming.

What the hell is the point in being a smartass about it if you know that it has nothing to do with speed. Do you argue for the sake of it?
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#26
Quote by Gacel
128th notes ... what for?

for christ sake, show me someone playing 128th notes on 120 beats per minute. i dont think the human ear could hear something close to "music"

You've never heard speedcore, the typical tempo is between 250bpm and 1000bpm...
You probably wouldn't like it though, it comes from hardcore techno.
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i can only keep it up for about 30 seconds before my fingers cramp up =[

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#27
Quote by VIRUSDETECTED
Also keep in mind each instruments physical requirements. Guitar is a very demanding instrument (Physically). Piano, on the other hand, isn't. Think about those insanely fast piano solos. It can get to the point where they're just rolling their hands on the keys. Me and my friend were talking about this earlier today. Piano solos will always be faster than any great guitar solo. It's just how the instrument is.
I'm sorry, but I simply cannot let this pass. Anyone who thinks the piano is less physically demanding than the guitar has never studied the instrument to any great depth. I have been playing the piano for nearly 50 years, and the guitar for almost that long, and I can tell you without hesitation that neither instrument presents an advantage from a physical point of view - they're both simply hard in different ways.
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#28
I've seen 64th and 128th notes used in Baroque music, in Beethoven slow movements, and in modern music. They were all in slow tempos, so they weren't actually particularly fast. 128th notes are quite rare though, but 32nd and 64th notes show up a fair amount.