#1
Ok sorry if this isn't in the right place.
Well i've learnt major scales, pentatonic scales,and chords.
Some songs,Enter sandman(not solo),sweet child of mine, some nirvana etc......
I just don't know what to do next .
#2
learn how to playin rhythm, develop pick speed, learn more songs from diff genres (to expand ur musical knowledge and also diff genres need diff guitar technique). learn the minor, melodic and harmonic minor scales. then memorize ur neck. be able to name a random note on the neck really fast. and once u know ur guitar inside n out, learn to read music and music theory.
#3
Ok i understand everything but rhythm,Isn't it just like a couple chord changes thru the whole song?
#4
rhythm isnt always chords. sometimes its jsut roots, recurring notes. pretty much anything that repeats in a song.
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Once, I watched Star Wars episode 4. I timed myself so that I came right when the death star blew up.

Afterwards, Han Solo said "Great shot kid, that was one in a million!"
#5
Quote by xXzacharooXx
Ok i understand everything but rhythm,Isn't it just like a couple chord changes thru the whole song?


In most metal/rock rhythm plays the same thing as lead but lead will have a solo. Only for less technical bands though.
#6
What are you trying to achieve with your playing? What you should do next is continue to enjoy playing......you can learn more theory, more songs and create your own, or just build up your speed on the stuff you already know.

Rhythm wise check out Symphony X and Iced Earth. A few good starters would be..

Symphony X - In the Dragons Den
Symphony X - Smoke and Mirrors
Iced Earth - Dantes Inferno
Iron Maiden - Flash of the Blade

Most of all have fun, continue with what motivates and interests you.
#7
Quote by xXzacharooXx
Ok i understand everything but rhythm,Isn't it just like a couple chord changes thru the whole song?

Isn't lead just a couple notes played over the rhythm?

There's a lot more to rhythm then just a couple chord changes. It's timing, for one. The rhythm carries the song, it's not a matter of just hitting the notes; it's hitting them consistantly to a steady beat. Steady rhythm playing also lends itself to solid leads, because you'll have to form a better understanding of key changes.

Next, I'd say learn to apply what you know. Do you just know the scales, or can you do somthing with them? Do you know the notes, or just boxes? Can you kinda play the songs, or can you play them almost exactly like the recording? I've met so many players who "know" songs, but they sound nothing like the actual recording. In that same vein, I've met just as many who "know" scales, but can't do anything with them. Scales aren't just lead or rhythm, they're the basis of what gives 'flavor' to your music.
-Guitar Gear-
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#9
Quote by Garou1911
Isn't lead just a couple notes played over the rhythm?

There's a lot more to rhythm then just a couple chord changes. It's timing, for one. The rhythm carries the song, it's not a matter of just hitting the notes; it's hitting them consistantly to a steady beat. Steady rhythm playing also lends itself to solid leads, because you'll have to form a better understanding of key changes.

Next, I'd say learn to apply what you know. Do you just know the scales, or can you do somthing with them? Do you know the notes, or just boxes? Can you kinda play the songs, or can you play them almost exactly like the recording? I've met so many players who "know" songs, but they sound nothing like the actual recording. In that same vein, I've met just as many who "know" scales, but can't do anything with them. Scales aren't just lead or rhythm, they're the basis of what gives 'flavor' to your music.


+1